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Full text of "The New York Clipper (September 1919)"


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THE NATIONAL THEATRICAL WEEKLY 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 



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Copyrighted, 1919. and publiihed weekly by the Clipper Corporation. ICO* Broadway. New York. Entered at the Post-oSce at New York, June 94. \ 879. aa t 



i mall matter trader Act of March 3. 1879. 



Founded by 
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NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 3, 1919 



VOLUME LXVn— No. 30 
Price. Ten Cents, $4.00 a Yaae 



B'DWAY PICTURE 

PUCES RAISE 

ADMISSION 

OTHER CITIES LIKELY TO FOLLOW 



What will probably, lead to an increase 
in admission prices in the better moving 
picture houses; throughout -the United 
States was started this week when four 
of the larger Xew York picture places an- 
nounced that, after September . first, it 
■would be necessary for them to make an 
increase in their admission price. This 
step is made necessary, they assert, be- 
cause of the economic conditions prevalent ' 
in the motion picture world. 

Beginning Labor Day, Loew"s New York 
Theatre announced the following scale of 
prices: Week days, 10, 20, 30; nights, 
10, 25, 35. Saturdays, Sundays and holi- 
days, 15, 25, 30. These prices include war 
ta.v, and are an increase of five cents on 
their former prices. 

The Strand, . following a grant of 
twenty-five per cent increase in salary to 
employees, raised its admission price to 40 . 
and 60 cents. Formerly, the prices were 
35 and 55 cents. 

The management of the Bivoli and 
Kialto theatres has also announced that, 
following the first of the month there 
will be an increase in the admission price 
of both theatres. The new price scale for 
these two houses for afternoon perform- 
ances ranges from 25 cents to one dollar 
and for evening performances from 40 
cents to one dollar. Their Sunday and 
holiday prices are the same as those 
charged for the evening performances. 

According to the managements of the 
different houses, producers have had to 
face a greater cost in the making of pic- 
tures for the coming season, and as a 
result there has been a corresponding in- 
crease in the rentals and in the cost of 
the proper presentation of these pictures. 

This increase in prices of the Broadway 
picture houses is looked upon by exhibi- 
tors throughout the country as the begin- 
ning of a movement to raise the admission 
prices of the better class picture places 
in the larger cities, and it is expected that 
within .the next few months managers 
will be following the lead set by the 
Broadway houses. 



SAVES DROWNING MAN 

William Caffrey, employed in the offices 
of the Keith vaudeville circuit, saved a 
man from drowning in Long Island Sound, 
off Whitestone Landing, last Sunday. The 
man gave his name as Delacey Manning, 
of .Larchmont, New York. 

Caffrey, who was swimming at the time, 
w that Manning was being carried out by 
the tide and was going down.. He swam 
toward him and rescued him despite the 
struggles of the drowning man and 
brought him to shore, while persons at the 
Beechhurst Yacht Club and passengers on 
the Sound boats viewed the rescue.' The 
drowning man was unconscious when the 
P»>- reached the shore, but was soon 
revived. 



HELD UNDER DRUG LAW 

On the strength of having a small bottle 
of white powder in his possession, said 
by the police to be a narcotic Charley 
Weller, who has been appearing in the 
A. E. A. show at the Lexington Theatre, 
was arrested last week by a member of 
the narcotic squad at Fifty-first street 
and Sixth avenue. Weller was arraigned 
before Magistrate Ten Eyck and held in 
$500 bail for further hearing. 

According to Welter's friends, he had 
just procured a bottle of medicine from 
a nearby drug store for a member of the 
company and, when arrested, was un- 
aware of its contents. 



CIRCUS SOLD FOR $130 

St. Johnsbtjry, Vt, Aug. 30.— The 
property, of the defunct Coop and Lent 
circus, valued at $3,500, for its tents and 
equipment, was sold at public auction, here 
today for $130 to Paul W. Gilman. of this 
city. The purchase included one large 
tent, together with seats to accommodate 
1,500 persons, eight side show tents, car- 
bide lights, ticket booths and other equip- 
ment. 

The Coop and Lent circus was recently 
attached for $2,000 on a personal injury 
suit of a New Hampshire woman. The 
show had a streak of hard luck in Ver- 
mont and finally collapsed financially and 
physically. 



PALACE ISSUES MAGAZINE 

B. F. Keith's Palace Magazine made its 
appearance on Monday. It Is a neat, well 
printed five oy seven weekly publication 
and combines the Palace theatre weekly 
program with some interesting reading, 
advertising and other matter usually found 
in a theatrical weekly. It is published 
under the auspices of the B. F. Keith cir- 
cuit and is edited by Leon J. Kubenstein 
and Leon Lee. 



ARRESTED FOR HAVING DRUGS 

Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. 30.— Evelyn 
King, an actress, living at Third and 
Flower Sts.. this city, was arrested this 
week charged with being implicated with 
John Franks in having in their possession 
about $500 worth of drugs. Miss King, 
aged 24, is being held with Franks, for 
violation of the State Poison Laws. 



"DREAM GIRL'** REHEARSING 

"The Dream Girl," first of the Popular 
Productions, with Muriel Ostrich as the 
star, and Bert -Dixon, in support, has 
started rehearsals at Mannerchor Hall. 
AH members of the cast have Equity con- 
tracts. 



BARE LEGS LEAD TO JAIL 

San Francisco, Cal., Aug. 31. — Marj- 
orie Taylor and Jane McGee, two members 
of' "Ohin Chin," were arrested here this 
week charged with stopping traffic when 
they paraded through the crowded shop- 
ping districts with bare legs. They were 
released. 



CLARK'S HAWAHANS TO SAIL 

Clark's Hawaiians will sail for England 
on September 20th, where they will appear 
in a production under the management of 
Campbell, Ltd. They have been booked for 
twelve weeks, • • 



STAGE HANDS AND MUSICIANS 
TAKE HE LM IN AC TORS' FIGHT 

Situation Narrows Down to a Struggle of Endurance, Each Side 

Standing Pat — Shubert* May Try to Break 

Deadlock with Non-Union Help 



JOINS "GREENWICH FOLLIES'* 

Jerry Delaney has been added to the 
cast of "The Greenwich Village Follies," 
opening Labor Day matinee. 



With another week of the warfare be- 
tween the Actors*' Equity Association and 
its allies against the Producing Managers' 
Association turned into history, two im- 
portant developments appear uppermost. 

.The first is that the Equity and its mem- 
bers appear to have become only a part of 
a struggle between the labor organizations 
engaged in the theatres and the managers' 
association, for, whereas the Equity for- 
'merly directed the struggle, leadership now 
seems to have shifted to the heads of the 
stagehands and musicians' union. 

People close to the situation state that 
this is a result of Samuel Gompers' return 
to this country, and of his having given 
his full approval to the action of the two 
unions in going to bat for the Equity. Long 
before the head of the A. F. of L. returned 
he was advised by cable and otherwise that 
the two strongly organized unions were 
much incensed because the managers had 
waved the Danbnry Hatters' decision be- 
fore the Equity, and that walkouts were 
already being put into effect. Whether 
Gompers approved of this or not was not 
known until his return to this country, 
when he was met by representatives of the 
managers, the unions and the A. E. A. In 
conference with each of them, however, 
and at a speech in the Lexington Theatre, 
he made it plain that he looked with com- 
plete favor upon the action of the musi- 
cians and stage hands. From that point on 
these two unions have practically assumed 
direction of the strike, walking ont of 
houses whether the Equity seemingly ap- 
proves or not. 

The other new development is that both 
"camps" have gone into winter quarters. 
That is. each has reached the point upon 
which it is determined to make its final 
stand and will stand pat upon its present 
principles, trusting that its power of en- 
durance is- greater than the enemy's. On 
the side of the Equity, the actors* organi- 
zation is still sticking to its original 
ground, which is .that its union shall be 
recognized by the managers. In the new 
Fidelity contract it may be said that the 
managers have half recognized the Equity 
in the arbitration clause, which reads that 
in the event of a dispute, each side shall 
choose an arbitrator, who may be a repre- 
sentative of an organization, if so desired. 
While it is very remote, at the present time, 
that an arbitrator would be a member of 
the Equity (because the new contract has 
not been drawn np with any Equity mem- 
bers) yet there is nothing to prevent It, 
and, in suggesting this clause, the mana- 
gers have given up considerable ground. 

Regarding the stagehand situation, it 
was stated early this week that the Shu- 
berts were leading a movement to organise 
new unions for both the stagehands and 
musicians. It was said that they had been 
advertising in out-of-town papers for com- 
petent men and that they had received 
many replies. Many of these, It is said, 
came from stock companies, the stage- 
hands of- which see an o p po rtu nity to grab 
off a contract at a good salary. Regarding 



the musicians, it is said that the closing of 
Summer parks and small seashore resorts 
has and will throw a large number of men 
out of employment who will be glad to 
work for the managers. 

The strike is assuming more and more 
of a nation-wide proportion, and practically 
everywhere legitimate theatres are still 
dark. In the last week the strike has 
taken Philadelphia. Boston and Washing- 
ton in its wake. Atlantic City and Chicago 
theatres are also dark, and cities that have 
been accustomed to legitimate road shows 
find their big houses closed for the period 
of the strike. 

With the winning of the stationary fire- 
men to their aide, the Equity has substan- 
tially strengthened its position. The sup- 
port of the firemen is not as trivial as it 
may appear at first glance, and if they 
decide to back the Equity to the limit, it 
will strengthen the Equity's chances of 
victory. 

The attitude of the firemen was sup- 
posed to be neutral until John T. Cashin, 
one of their officials, stated at the Lexing- 
ton Theatre mass meeting on Saturday 
last that his men were "with the Equity.'* 

"The stationary firemen in the New 
York theatres are one hundred per cent 
Equity," he declared. • 

If the firemen should decide to walk out, 
it would leave the theatres without anyone 
to care for their heating apparatus, and it 
is said_ that such action would cause the 
insurance companies to revoke their policies 
on the grounds that there was no competent 
men to look after the safety of the houses. 

The Theatrical Wardrobe Attendants' 
Union is also contemplating ways and 
means of becoming more active in the fight 
and has called a "grand mass meeting" at 
Union Hall for Sunday evening, September 
■14th, to "help better, conditions." It is 
thought that this means "Strike!'* 

A rumor that Ziegfeld Follies would start 
rehearsing again on Tuesday could not be 
confirmed at the Ziegfeld offices, for no 
one there seemed to care to give official 
credence to the story. 

On Monday night, the Gallo Opera Com- 
pany, which was scheduled to open at the 
Shubert Theatre, disappointed theatregoers 
when the musicians and stagehands refused 
to work. This action of their allies sur- 
prised even Equity officers, for Frank Gil- 
more had stated at an Equity mass meeting 
that the Gallo Company was the Equity's 
friend and would not be "pulled." He ex-' 
plained to the strikers that Gallo was bound 
by contract to pay the Shuberts for two 
weeks' rental whether his company played 
or not- Therefore, dark or open, the Shu- 
berts could not lose on the venture, and 
Gflmore explained that the Equity "was 
not out to hurt its friends." No one, man- 
agerial or otherwise, seemed inclined to 
make a statement on Monday night regard- 
ing this walkout. 

There was a report, however,' that ths 
stage hands had discovered the SlrubeTta 
were hacking the venture. 

(Continued on page 23.) 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September. 3, 1919 



FEAR OF INCOME TAX KEEPS 

ARTIS TS FROM AUSTRALIA 

Belief That It Is Heavy Scares Americans from Filling Engage- 
ments, Says Hugh Mcintosh, Who Declares Such 

Idea* Erroneous and Unfounded 



That artists are laboring under a false 
fear r e g ar ding the amount of income tax 
they would have to pay if they attempted 
to fill any engagements in Australia, and 
as a result, needlessly cancel or refuse to 
accept contracts calling for their appear- ■ 
ance in Sydney, Melbourne and other 
Antipodean cities, was contained in a 
letter received-. -this - week by the Clip- 
peb from Hugh D. Mcintosh, head of 
the Tivoli Theatres, Ltd. Efforts of his 
representative to engage people to make 
the trip to Australia have revealed that 
American stage folk have an entirely 
erroneous idea of the amount of tax that 
would have to be paid, he states. 

As a -result, Mr. Mcintosh has had pre- 
pared a statement outlining the work- 
ing and amount of the tar as it applies- 
to A y"*"'* or others in Australia, 
which is being distributed. It is as fol- 
lows: 

"It has come under our notice that ar- 
tists who would otherwise pay Australia 
a visit are deterred from doing so by 
reason of the alleged extraordinarily high 
Income Tax payable on their earnings in 
the Commonwealth of Australia.. Where 
this report originated it would be . hard 
to conjecture, but in order to allay the 
fears on this score of artists contem- 



plating a visit to sunny Australia, we 
give herein details of Federal Income Tax 
payable: 

Income earned from personal exertion 
as stipend, salary, or wages, say 
20 weeks at £20 per week. £400 

Deductions allowed: 

t ,it .> Insurance premiums on self and 
-wire not exceeding £60..... 

£12 for each child under the age of 16 

General exemption £156 

Balance on which tax payable £244 

"Assuming that there were no deduc- 
tions other thai) the general exemption 
of £156, Income Tax would be payable on 
£244 out of an actual earning of £400. 
The rate charged, 3.153d. in the pound, 
would make the total amount of Income 
Tax £3-4-1. This is by no means an ex- 
cessive, charge, and is considerably lower 
than the English Income Tax. 

"There is another aspect of the question 
of a visit to - Australia which will as- 
suredly appeal to artists, and that is 
living conditions are lower than in any 
other part of the world. Climatic condi- 
tions are delightfully pleasant. Travel- 
ing from one capital to the other neces- 
sitates only one night's train journey. 
And last, but not least, the voyage across 
the Pacific is so calm during the greater ' 
portion of the year that even the worst 
sailors enjoy comparative comfort." 



"MIDGET FOLLIES" OPEN -. 

MOKBISTOWH, N. J„ Aug. 29. — With nine 
midgets in feature roles, the "Midget Musi- 
cal Follies" opened at the Lyons' Park 
Theatre, here this week. The cast has 
seventeen members, including the nine 
midgets, two leading men and six chorus 
girls. 

Musical comedies are presented, the bill 
being changed three times a week. The 
first show given here was "Hotel a la 
Carte," this being followed by "The Floor 
Walker" and "Cleopatra Outdone." All 
of the plays were of the usual mnsicnl 
comedy style, with little plot, and not 
overmuch music 

The midgets take the principal parts and 
are also featured in specialty acts. Major 
Don Ward does a strong man and acrobatic 
act, including weight lifting, bending steel 
bars and trapeze work. George and Jennie 
Sullivan have a musical act, and the other 
midgets give solos or special dances. The 
midget comedian parts are taken by Louis 
Stroeffler as a Hebrew and. Carnot Dodson 

as an T, »ifthm»n 

One of the attractive features is a danc- 
ing, specialty by the Roland Sisters. In 
new dances and interpretations of the Co- 
lonial steps, they have proved the feature 
of the show. 

The company is backed by Matt Knsell 
and James J. Lyons. The latter is owner 
of the Park Theatre, and this is his first 
venture into the show business. Kusell is 
managing the show and has written the 
plays. 

From Morristown the Follies go to Mt 
Carmel Pa., and later to Philadelphia. 
After that it will work westward, hitting 
the coast in the Fall. 

The cast of the show includes Tom E. 
Warne, Billy Mack and the Roland Sisters ; 
Midgets— Cernot Dodson, Isabelle Stroef- 
fie., Annie Nelson, Elsie King, Jennie Sul- 
livan, George Laible, Louis Stroefler, 
George Sullivan and Major Don Ward. 

The Dancing Girls are Doris Roland, 
Evelyn Murray, Rose Steffan, Lillian Rose- 
lyn, Edward Said, Margery Marshall , 

The midgets were assembled in Morris- 
town about three weeks ago and rehearsed 
daily at the Lyons' Theatre. AO were in 
vaudeville or at summer parks before 
being gathered togeher for this show. 

Mrs. Knsell, wife of the manager, is with 
the show and coaches -the dancers. 



BERT LA MONT IS BACK 

Bert LaMont returned from England 
last week, bringing with him the news 
that he had done everything he had gone 
over there to -do and a little bit more. He. 
had some interesting remarks to make - 
anent living conditions in England and 
the feelings of English artists toward 
Americans. 

"The Fi"gK»h are not prejudiced against 
the Americans," said Lallonte. "They 
like them better than ever, bnt they don't 
like to have it rubbed in that America 
won the war. They do not object to 
American acts, but they want English 
actors who have seen service to he given 
a chance to secure work before American 
acts are booked. 

"Although living is higher than it used to 
be, it is not as high as it is in the States. 
I stopped at a Diggs for one week, be- 
ginning August 4th. I had a bedroom, bath 
and sitting room, five meals a day, mend- 
ing, shoes shined and washing, and my 
bill at the end of the week was $11 .31. 

"I also went to the Regent Palace, one 
of the best hotels in London, where I had 
a room and bath, running water, shoes 
shined and breakfast, all for SL75. And 
the price had just been raised one shilling. 
I had a filet mignon steak at the Regent 
Grill which cost $.52. A hair cut cost $.12, 
a manicure $.18. Shoes and clothing are 
very high, the prices for them being the 
same as over here. The transportation 
service is poor, however, and I was forced 
to use a taxi all the time. ,Taxi rates 
are eight cents a half mile. Booking com- 
mittees axe very decent and accorded me 
the finest treatment possible. I have 
proof of all that I say and will show it 
to anybody that wants to see it." 

LaMont booked a long list of acts for 
tours of England, most of them for full 
tours and getting the salaries asked for. 
Among them are: The Cowboy Minstrels, 
"The New Doctor," Freddy Allen, "Turkish 
Bath Frolics," LaFrance and Kennedy, 
Bobby Henshaw, "Speed Mechanics,*' 
0"Donnell and Blair, "Beach of Waikiki," 
Varr and Tunis, Mary Daw, Rice, Sully 
and Scott, Donald E. Roberta. 

These comprise the bulk of the acta 
represented, there being only five names 
that are as yet ready for publication. La- 
Mont has an English representative, who 
will look after these interests of these 
acts while they are in the country. 



O'BRIEN NOT WITH MINSTRELS 

Elmira, N. Y., Aug. 27.— When -Neil 
O'Brien's Minstrels appeared here last 
night, Neil O'Brien, who has always ap- ' 
peared with the show heretofore, was out 
of the cast. 

Despite bis absence, however, the show 
was liked. Ollie Debrow shimmeyed with 
success and a son g by. EL F. Qujnn, "Can 
Ton - Tame Wild Women" .went over 
with a punch. "Sngarfoot" Gaffney. 'and - 
Bobby Gassans sang and danced to the 
delight of the audience. 

Bert Swor, though, was the big hit of 
the show. His gags and monologue be- 
tween acts, as well as his song, "In Room 
202". were all liked. Miller and Strong 
were ' featured in the olio, which is some-' 
what shorter, than usual. Major Nowak, 
the midget who has been with the show 
for years appeared with Swor in "The 
Potato Feeler," a sketch. At the dose 
came "The World of Expla-nations," in 
four rounds, by Neil O'Brien, a one-act 
minstrel musical satire, and it ended the 
show in excellent fashion. 
. The following statement by O'Brien re- 
garding his non-appearance appears on the 
program of the show: "While I do not 
appear personally in the production so long 
as it bears my name I stand sponsor for it 
and hope to merit your continued confi- 
dence. I have given personal attention to ' 
the staging of the production with the view 
of maintaining the high standard set by me 
in the past The acts were written by me 
and it is my intention to devote my time to 
this end in the future, believing I can best 
serve to amuse you in this way. 

"Nell O'Brien. 



McGARRY BECOMES K. C. SEC'TY 
Vladivostock, Aug. 3. — Garry McGarry, 
' formerly a well known musical comedy star 
and long a Broadway favorite, has trans- 
ferred his activities here as Secretary in 
the Orient for the Knights of Colnmbus, 
and is trying to make the lives of the 
Allied soldiers here a little brighter. 

McGarry has taken over "The Golden 
Horn Theatre," on Swidlanski Street and 
is running it for the benefit and amusement 
of the Allied troops. He has secured the 
services of Aileen and Doris Woods, and 
The Banvard Musical Comedy Company, 
which was playing in China. Thia aggre- 
gation has already presented "The King of 
Patagonia," "Hello, Hawaii," and "Follow 
. Me," with such great success that return 
performances had to be given to satisfy the 
troops and the public. McGarry also put 
on a performance of "The Garden of Alo- 
ha" with tremendous success. He also put 
on performances with soldiers and sailors 
in the cast and the result has been in- 
creased demand for his entertainments by 
the troops. 

McGarry has, in addition, supplied an- 
other long felt want by opening a restursnt 
where the Allied troops can get real good 
food at reasonable prices The charges 
made by the restaurants to soldiers is ex- 
tortionate, for the owners know they will 
pay. McGarry not only provides them with 
good food at reasonable prices, but also 
gives a free vaudeville and moving picture 
show, with up-to-date pictures on his pro- 
gram. The Allied troops in Vladivostock 
now recognize only one organisation, The 
KC. 



LEWIS' WIDOW LEFT $38,999 
The estate of Mrs. Dora S. Lewis, widow 
of James Lewis, the famous comedian, to- 
tals $38,999. This fact was disclosed last 
week when Surrogate Cohalen ordered 
the executrix of the estate to pay $1,981 
in inheritance taxes. 

The gross estate of the comedian's 
widow, inherited from Lewis, amounted to 
$48,830' and included $4,224 in cash in 
banks; $1,417 in jewelry, $1,010 in per- 
sonal, effects and $40,179 in securities. 

The expenses were $794 for the funeral, 
$5,536 for administration, $856 for credi- 
tors, and $635 executrix's commissions, to- 
taling $7,831 against the estate. Anna 
Louise King, of the Hotel St. Andrew, is 
the executrix. 



REMARRIED WITHOUT DIVORCE 

That' she had been led to remarry be- 
fore she had obtained a complete divorce 
from a man to whom she was- already 
married, is the grounds upon which' Grace 
Cameron, in vaudeville,- went into court 
last week through her attorney, Harry 
Saks Hechheimer, and asked to have her 
marriage to -Louis Crittenden Connor, a 
stock broker,. annulled.. " 

The -papers in the' case set forth that 
Miss. Cameron married Connor in Minne- 
apolis on December 31, 1914, he having 
told her, she alleges, that an action for 
divorce which she had started' against 
Horace W. Ken worthy, in California, had 
been decided in her favor. She" later dis- 
covered, she charges, that only an- inter- 
locutory decree had been issued to her at 
that time and that the final decree in fhe 
case < was not issued by the court until 
July 6th 1915. As a result, she contends 
that her marriage was, invalid' and, asks 
that the court ' allow 'her . alimony and 
counsel.' fee -until she can have.lt annulled. 
Miss Cameron recently attached the bank 
account of her husband in the Harriman 
National Bank." ~. 



* '; '.- 



AUTHOR'S CHILDREN GET ESTATE 

Norman and Barbara Lee, both children 
of Albert Lee, author and playwright, will 
share the estate left by their father's 
mother, Mrs. Victorine Lee, who died on 
December 29th last, at the age of eighty- 
seven. 

Albert Lee, author of "Miss Phoenix," a 
play produced at the Harris Theatre, No- 
vember 3, 1913, is cat off by the will, 
executed fifty-six hours before- her death. 

The estate is said to consist of between 
$28,000 and $30,000 in cash, with the 
Farmer's Loan and Trust. Company ; about 
$300,000 worth of stocks and bonds with 
the General Union Trust * Company ; 
jewelry, stock and personal effects to the 
amount, of $18,000. This will be divided 
between Norman, twenty-two years of age, 
and his sister Barbara, five years of age. 
The two live with their father, Albert Lee. 

Brig. Gen. Albert Lindley Lee, who was 
the husband of Mrs. Victorine Lee, died at 
the age of 73 in 1907. 



DEMPSEY CANCELS CHICAGO 
' Chicago, Aug. 31. — Jack Dempsey, 
world's heavyweight champion, has can- 
celled his engagement here on account of 
the theatrical strike. Although Barney 
Liehtenstein, who is interested in the syn- 
dicate paying Demps ey about $10,000 a 
week says the show has cleared more than 
$18,000, reports from other sources are to 
the contrary, saying that the production is 
just about breaking even. 

The fighter is billed to appear in Decatur 
tomorrow (Monday), Milwaukee on Tues- 
day and Wednesday, Fort Wayne on 
Thursday and Cleveland on Friday and 
Saturday. The following week he will 
show in Philadelphia. 



' SUES FOR FALSE ARREST 

James Slagle, formerly a member of the 
acrobatic team of Slagle and Burns, last 
week -instituted a suit through his attor- 
ney, Harry Saks Hechheimer, for $5,000, 
against a policeman named Torpey, for 
false arrest. According to the complaint 
in the case, Slagle went to Fifth avenue 
recently to watch the p"*"^ of one of 
the soldier parades, and being near Cen- 
tral Park, climbed up into a tree to ob- 
tain a better view of the p""*^ troops. 
The policeman ordered him down, and 
when he refused to comply, placed him 
under arrest. Slagle was discharged in 
court and the suit followed. 



JOINS FOX PUBLICITY STAFF 
David J. Lais tig, formerly of the Bridge- 
port Times, has been appo inted special 
publicity man with the William Fox Film 
Corporation. - 



STERN PLAY OPENS 

Cleveland, Sept. 1. — A. S. Stern opened 
Mark Swan's comedy, "She .Walked In Her 
Sleep," at the Colonial Theatre here today 
with the following cast : Arthur Ayles- 
worth, Eva Williams, Joseph Orehan, Wal- 
ter Parker, Thomas _ V. Emory, Jack W. 
Lewis, George Howard, Antoinette Roebte. 
Lea Winslow, Ruth Hammond and Rose 
Wilson. - 



BOOKED FOR MONTREAL 

Cook's Victory Show, a carnival, has 
been booked by Sheik Hadji Tahar for 
the Cartier celebration at Montreal. 



September 3; 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



BIG STEAMSHIP COMPANY TO 

TRY CABARET S ON LINERS 

White Star Line Reported to View Idea Favorably with First 

Attempt to Be Confined to the Cedric 

and' Baltic 



The scope of theatrical activity will be boats, it is said, 



broadened to include entertainment 
ocean liners, ' if plans now under way 
successfully materialize. Within a couple 
of months, tourists who ride the briny 
deep will, in' all probability, have vaude- 
ville de luxe served to them in the form . 
of a cabaret with their mid-day and 
evening meals, as well as regular even- 
ing variety performances. 

This action follows as a result of the 
competition that exists between the vari- 
ous steamship companies. Every possible 
comfort has been pnt into these floating 
palaces, and the installation of cabarets 
aboard ship will be the crowning triumph. ' 

The White Star line, plying hetween 
New Tork City and Liverpool, ."is re-' 
ported to have originated the idea, and 
it is stated that the idea will be first 
tried out -on the Cedric and Baltic If it 
proves successful on those boats it will 
be extended to all White Star passenger 



This marks the opening of a new field 
for the vaudeville and cabaret performer, 
if the plan is perfected.. For, if the 
White Star concern should succeed with 
the project, it is likely that all the other 
lines plying between the United States 
and the Old World will follow suit. The 
programs will demand high class acts 
and acts touring the "Ocean Circuit'' 
would probably Se engaged for long pe- 
riods, as they would play to almost en- 
tirely new audiences on every trip, and 
there would be no good reason for 
changing the bill very often. 

Although plans are still in the rough, 
it is probable that the White Star inter- 
ests will open- a new department very 
shortly to book acts for their floating 
theatres. 

It is thought that the steamship com- 
panies should be willing to pay their acts 
a comparatively high wage. 



BROOKLYN STRAND OPENS 

The formal opening and dedication of ' 
the Strand Theatre, Fulton street and 
Rockwell Place, Brooklyn, was held last 
Friday night ■ Guests of Strand stock- 
holders, together with many persona prom- 
inent in Brooklyn theatrical and civic cir- 
cles, filled the new picture house to 
capacity. 

Brooklyn's new Strand Theatre corre- 
sponds to the Strand in Manhattan and 
is controlled by the same corporation, the 
Michel Hallark Realty Corporation. It is 
one of the largest theatres in the world. 
John Loveridge will act as managing 
director. 

Among the speakers on the opening night 
were J. Victor Wilson, publicity director, 
and 6. Hoffman, - acting borough presi- 
dent. Mr. Hoffman, on behalf of the people 
of the borough, expressed .bis thanks to the 
management for the new theatre, declaring 
that, aside from adding taxable value to the 
borough, it had opened a new era in 
Brooklyn's theatrical history.' 

The design throughout the new theatre is 
Pompeiian block, gold, bronze and green 
are the predominating colors. The marble 
lobby and stairway, were hanked- with 
roses, cut flowers and' potted plants Friday 
night, the gifts of the management's many 
friends. 

The opening bill included Geraldine 
Farrar and Lou Tellegen in the new photo- 
play, "The World and Its Women.** The 
new picture house opened to the public 
Saturday afternoon. 

NEW COMPANY CHARTERED 
Tbbhton, N. J., Aug. 30. — The Roberta 
Amusement Company was chartered in the 
office of the Secretary of. State yesterday, 
with Jacob M. Klein as agent, for the 
purpose of owning and operating motion 
picture and other kinds of theatres and 
also for the producing of all kinds of the- 
atrical performances. The offices of the 
company are at 175 Smith street, Perth 
Amboy. 

The firm is capitalized at $60,000, which 
is divided into 000 shares of $100 par. The 
amount that will be devoted to the starting 
of the business is $3,000. The incorpor- 
ators and the amount of shares held by 
each are, David Sbaper, 10; Sol Kelsey, 
10, and Philip Klivan; 10. 



"WHAT'S. THE ODDS" OPENING SET 

Sam Shannon's new production "What's 
the Odds" will open in Baltimore at the 
Academy of Music Monday, and will come 
to New York after a three weeks' engage- 
ment. 

"What* s the Odds" is a musical comedy 
in three acts by Edgar Alien Woolf, with 
music by Albert von Tilzer and lyrics by 
Neville Fleeson. -The story of the play is 
based on "Checkers." The cast includes: 
William E. Median, George McKay, 
Mable Withee, Marie Hall and William 
Fitzsimmons. 



CAST OF "BRIDE SHOP" INTACT 

The same cast that has been presenting 
"The Bride Shop" in vaudeville will be 
seen in the piece when it opens as a regu- 
lar road musical comedy production. They 
include Eddie -Vogt, John Solly, Jack 
Claire, James Conroy, Muriel Rostrick, 
Frances Allison, Elisabeth Worth and a 
chorus of twelve girls. Steve King will 
be in advance and E. Lattimer will man- 
age the show for George Choos, who owns 
it 



N. V. A. TO HAVE ROOF GARDEN 

By next Summer, it is planned to have 
a roof garden atop the N. Y. A. clubhouse, 
which will cater to luncheon and supper 
crowds. The roof at the N. V. A. offers 
a good view of the White Light district 
and will be fixed up with suitable fixtures 
and lanterns in accordance with the same 
artistic touch that is found in other parts 
of the club. 



ROB OPERA DIRECTOR'S HOME 
The home of Otto Goritx, the baritone 
and director of the proposed Star Opera 
Company, was robbed late last Saturday 
night and jewelry, clothing, medals and 
stage paraphernalia taken. The amount 
lost is estimated at about $10/100. Mm. 
Gorits and. the children are at Greenwood 
Lake, N. J. Among the loot was a gold 
medal given him by Ex-President Taft 



ACTOR SAYS HE WAS DUPED 

Joseph Burdell, who claims that he is 
a theatrical manager, was arrested last 
week, charged with obtaining money un- 
der false pretences and locked up in the 
East 126th Street Station. 

George Wiley, an actor, was the ac- 
cuser. He, explained that he had seen 
an advertisement in a newspaper some 
days ago promising a bright future upon 
the stage to young men or women. They 
were instructed to communicate with 
"Ward 1785 Lexington Avenue," for de- 



LOUIS R1ED SUED FOR DIVORCE 

Jessie Ried, wife of Louis Ried, of the 
act of Ried and Tucker, which last week 
played the Orpheum, Brooklyn, has started 
an action for divorce - throagh Harry 
Saks. Hechheimer. She charges that, be- 
tween October 1 of last year and August 1 
of the present summer, he was unfaith- 
ful with a woman whose name she could 
not obtain. Off stage, Ried's name is 
Louis Herzberg. 

PROVIDENCE HOUSES CLOSE 

Providence, R. I., Sept 1. — Three legiti- 
mate theatres due to open here today were 
unable to do so because of the actors' 
strike. The Shubert-Majestic, the May- 
flower, Klaw & Erlanger's new theatre 
here, and the Providence Opera House are 
oil affected. 



PAYTON GOING INTO CRESCENT 

Corse Pay ton will open the Crescent 
Theatre, Brooklyn, on September 15, with 
his own stock company. . His opening piece 
will be "Nothing but the Troth." T. W. 
Dinkins is Payton's partner in the enter- 
prise. 



Wiley wrote a letter and was invited 
to call on Ward, who offered him $35 a 
week to play a comedy role in a bur- 
lesque show called "The Welcome Home 
Girls." According to Wiley, Ward asked 
him for $12.06 for railroad expenses from 
New York to the city where the show 
was to open, and Wiley says he paid 
the money. Told to go to a certain hall 
for rehearsal, Wiley said the manager of 
the hall did not know Ward. Returning 
to the Lexington avenue address, Wiley 
says he was told Ward had moved. 

A few days ago Wiley saw another 
"ad" worded something like the first, but 
the. name was Burdell, and the address 
No. 66 East 126th street According to 
Wiley, he wrote to that address and re- 
ceived a letter from Burdell which he 
took to the police. 

Last week Wiley was accompanied to 
Burdell's address by Detectives Shields 
and Webb of the East 126th Street Sta- 
tion. Webb represented himself as an 
actor, and was "engaged." to play a 
waiter in a new show, while Wiley was 
again "engaged" as a comedian. They 
were told to go to the same hall for re- 
hearsal. Wiley says he recognized Bur- 
dell as Ward, but Burden did not recog- 
nize him. 

The police say Webb and Wiley were 
to get $35 a week each, were asked for 
$15 each to cover transportation to Cor- 
ning, N. Y., and as soon as the money 
was passed Burdell was arrested. 

According to the police, Burdell ad- 
mitted his "game" was illegal, but said 
he had formerly been ' in the legitimate 
theatrical business. His room was deco- 
rated with photographs of theatrical and 
moving picture stars. 

In court be was discharged. 



SOLDIER SOCIETY GROWS 

Until such time as they have built and 
■are ready to occupy their own clubhouse, 
the. S. Kanken. Drew Post of the Ameri- 
can Legion, will have its headquarters 

' and club room on the third floor of 
Keen's Chop House on Forty-fourth 

• street. A, moetiiuj will be held Friday 
night to accept a constitution and by- 
laws, and is open. to all theatrical, mov- 
ing picture and newspaper folk who 
served in the army, navy or marine corps 
during the war. 

Among the new members are James 
Loughborough, Milton Hochenberg, Harry 
Kalmine, Ernest Glendenning, Joe Reddy, 
Harry Lenetska, Paul Dempsey, J. P. Mc- 
Kowen, and Victor M. Shapiro. The 
meeting on Friday night will be pre- 
ceded oy a dinner at Keen's at seven 
o'clock sharp. 

BAND OUT OF SERVICE 

The famous 13th Regiment Marine Band, 
one of the noted musical organizations of 
the A. E. F., went out of official existence 
this week when. Lieut. Felix Ferdinando, 
leader, received his discharge. 

This band had the distinction of being 
selected to play at the opening ceremonies 
of the Pershing Stadium. It played for 
President Wilson, President Poincare of 
France and King Albert of Belgium. It 
returned from France with the Second 
Division and played for the New York 
and Washington parades of that division. 

Lieut Ferdinando is a resident of Hart- 
ford, Conn., and left New York for his 
home there. 



COURT REPRIMANDS BRULATOURS 

Pending the final solution of the matri- 
monial web that has tangled the marital 
affairs of the Brulntours, Supreme Court 
Justice Luce last week severely rebuked 
both of them, and after the scolding, 
soothed the feelings of Mrs. Dorothy 
Gibson Brulatour by granting her heart 
balm of $10,000 per year alimony and 
$15,000 for her counsel fees. Jules Ernest 
Brulatour, the defendant, is the million- 
aire importer of motion picture films. 

"An utter disregard of marital obliga- 
tions and a resort by both parties to the 
court to be relieved of their matrimonial 
vows, as if there' was nothing more than 
a contract at stake" is the manner in 
which Justice Lace referred to their ac- 
tion. In granting the plaintiff, who 
wanted $40,000 per year alimony, and 
$30,000 as fees for her attorney, only 
$10,000 alimony and $15,000 for her coun- 
sel, the court declared that "In these 
days when thrift and economy are urged 
upon all citizens, the court should not 
by its order sanction expenditures far 
beyond the reasonable capacity of its en- 
joyment." Brulatour will recover from 
the few thrills that the court has given 
him, _ for by this time, he should be a 
genuine veteran of the matrimonial game. 



TOLSTOY PLAY COMING 

London, Eng., "Aug. 30. — The Count 
Tolstoy drama, "The Man Who Was 
Dead," which was presented in America 
under the title of "Redemption,'' is to be 
shown here at the St James under the 
title of "The Depths." . 



HARLEM HOUSES RESUME TRYOUTS 

Tryouts of new acts were resumed on 
Friday at Proctor's 125th Street Theatre 
and will be continued every Friday 
throughout the Fall and Winter seasons 
until next June. Bob O'Donnell, assisted 
by Joe O'Neill, la presenting them. 

At the Harlem Opera House, tryouts are 
given at the Monday afternoon and evening 
performance, under the management of Sol 
LeVoy. Four out of seven tryouts were 
retained for the evening performance at the 
East 125th Street theatre on Friday. 



BEGIN DRURY LANE SERIES 

"The Best of Luck" will be the first of 
the series of six Drury Lane comedies to 
be produced by the Metro and purchased 
by Richard A. Rowland. It was produced 
in London in September, 1916, and was m 
success. Henry Hamilton, Arthur Collins 
and the late Cecil Raleigh are the authors 
of the piece. Albert Shelby Le Vine will 
write the scenario for the picture and Bar 
C, Small wood will direct it Harold 
Wenst will operate the camera. 

—*-*, ■ ~~~ 

REMICK OPENS NEW OFFICES 

Jerome H. Reinick A Co. have opened 
new professional offices in Minneapolis 
•and Buffalo. The Minneapolis office fa in 
the Pantages Building, and is under the 
management of Fred R. Strubel, Max 
Friedman is manager of the Buffalo 
branch. 



HALL AND DEANE REUNITED 

Hall and Deane, forced to split on ac- 
count of the war, have reunited, as Hall 
has returned from France, where he saw 
eleven months' service. They will appear 
shortly in vaudeville with a hew act 
written for them by Allen Spencer Tenney. 

MURRAY BLOOM IN DETROIT 

Murray Bloom of the Harry Von Tilzer 
music house is in Detroit, where for the 
next five weeks he will exploit the new 
Von Tilzer songs among the singers in 
that city. 

GET 48 WEEKS' TIME 

Lloyd and Christie have been given a 
route of forty-five weeks over the' Keith 
time. Harry Weber is handling tbe act 



MUCKENFUSS JOINS KESSLER 
Lee P. M"****"*"— j w ho has been con- 
ducting an agency in the Putnam Build- 
ing, will in the future be associated with 
Aaron Keasler, In The Strand Building. 



DUNBAR'S SINGERS GET 40 WEEKS 

Dunbar's Maryland Singers have been 
routed over the Keith houses for 40 weeks 
by Harry Weber. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 



U 



FLEET WEEK" BOOSTS BUSINESS 
AT SAN FRANCISCO THEATRES 

Casino, Columbia, Orpheum, Pantages, Hippodrome and Other 

Houses Filled with Strangers in Town to See 

the Sea Fighters 



San Francisco, CaL, Aug. 29. — Because 
of the crowds of strangers here owing to 
"Fleet Week," San Francisco's box offices 
are working overtime and the S- R. O. 
sign is the order of the day. 

"Chin Chin," at the Colombia, is reap- 
ing the benefit with capacity audiences, 
and, in the field of the speaking drama, it 
has practically no opposition, its only 
competitor being the Alcazar stocky where 
a revival of "The Brat" is playing to 
packed houses. 

The Orpheum packs 'em in twice daily 
and the current week's bill includes Mar- 
guerite Sylva. Bailey and Cowan, Marion 
Harris, Millicent Mower, Jack Gray nd 
Marie Norman, Emma Haig and Jack 
Waldron, Gibson and Comielli, Oscar Lor- 
aine and La Bernieia and Company. 

Will King and his entertainers are offer- 
ing a new musical revue at the 'Casino en- 
titled "Say Listen." With the change of 



the vaudeville entertainers, the. De Pace 
Brothers . and Company, are the present 
headliners at the Casino. The others on 
the bill are Don Stanley and Minette 
Lea,. Corporal Joe -Nathan, the Victoria 
Trio, Montambo and Nap, and Walter Gil- 
bert. 

The entire bill at Pantages Theatre 
p'eases the vast audiences that flock to this 
house, the only vaudeville show, on Market 
Street. The program includes The Crom- 
wells, Myers Novelty Minstrels, Ned Argo, 
Virginia Sisters, Juliette Dika, Green and 
Pugh and Submarine F-T. 

The Hippodrome offered six all good acts 
comprising the following : Gabberts Duo, 
Athletes, Billy Hicks, jack Roberts, Seven 
Camouflage Girls, Thrte Moran Sisters, 
Earl and Edwards, Galletis Monks and, for 
closing number, the Fox picture, "Be A 
Little Sport." 



ROCK AND WHITE PART 
William Rock and Frances White, one 
of the. most accomplished and best known 
sketch and dancing teams in vaudeville and 
musical comedy have dissolved, their part- 
nership. Miss White has been engaged by 
F. Ziegfeld Jr., and will appear in the new 
edition of "The Midnight Frolic" and the 
"Nine O'clock Revue." Rock will stage 
the numbers of several musical comedies 
and has had several vaudeville offers. At 
the present time, he is staging and re- 
hearsing "They're Off," the Sam Shannon 
musicalized version of "Checkers." 

PICTURE PALACES COMBINE 

San Francisco, CaL, Aug. 3L— The 
management of the Imperial, Partola and 
California Theatres have reached an agree- 
ment whereby all three will become "long 
ron" theatres, with special musical attrac- 
tions, as added features, at increased ad- 
mission prices. The first feature booked 
for an indefinite run win be "The Miracle 
Man," with "Male and Female" to follow. 
The Imperial is presenting this policy for 
the first time on Sept. 7th. 

WANTS HER $1,500 

Saw Francisco. CaL. Aug. 30. — Wilma 
Bennett, a cabaret performer, had Osman 
Reichel, for whom she w^s working in the 
Elite Cafe, arrested this week on a charge 
of obtaining money under false pretenses. 
She says he borrowed $1,500 from her for 
the purpose of developing a mining enter- 
prise which, she claims, did not exist. 

LEAVES CLEVELAND HOUSE 

Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 1. — John Hale, 
for five years manager of The Colonial 
Theatre, this city, has retired from that 
position and is removing to California, 
where he will make his home. Harry W. 
Ball, who for the last twelve years has 
been associated with the Shubert interests, 
has been appointed* in Hale's place. 

QUITS AFTER FORTY YEARS 

Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. LA. F. Hartz, 
for forty years manager of the Opera 
House, has announced his retirement from 
theatrical activities, when the lease on the 
theatre expires a? the conclusion of the 
present season. Ijprtz is seventy-six years 
of age. 



E. K_ LINCOLN'S WIFE SUES 

Charging that her former husband, 
Charles M. Van Heusen, obtained property 
from her by extortion, Mrs, Ada Olive 
Lincoln, wife of E. E. Lincoln, motion pic- 
ture actor, brought suit in the Supreme 
Court last week to recover the property 
which she alleges her former husband frau- 
dulently obtained before she divorced him 
at Kingston, N. Y„ in 1915. 

Aside from charging extortion, Mrs. Lin- 
coln further alleges that Van Heusen ob- 
tained large sums of money from her, 
threatening that he would falsely accuse 
her in divorce proceedings. Justice Hen- 
dricks has granted Mrs. Lincoln a tempor- 
ary injunction restraining Van Heusen 
from conveying the property claimed by his 
former wife and prosecuting his suit in 
Hampton County, Mass. 



GALLI-CURCI NAMES RIVAL 
Chicago, 111., Aug. 30. — Mme. Amelita 
Galli-Curci sprang a surprise yesterday 
when, in addition to. the suit for divorce 
which she has instituted against Luigi C. 
Curci, she also named a corespondent, 
changing her charges from cruelty to in- 
fidelity. The woman named is Melissa 
Brown, on whose deposition the singer 
made the charges asserting that Curci was 
guilty of misconduct with Miss Brown 
from September 15 to 30, 1917. 



CEST TO PRODUCE OPERA 

Reports are in circulation that Morris 
Gest may produce Russian opera this sea- 
son. The fact that he is lessee of the 
Manhattan Opera House and that be has 
always harbored a desire to promote Rus- 
sian opera in America, has led to the belief 
that he will produce and work his way 
into the fold of admirers which the late 
Oscar Hammerstein left behind. 



Ijprtz is 



PROMOTING B ATA VIA THEATRE 
Batatta. N. Y„ Aug. 31.— Harry D. 
Crosby, a local actor and director, has 
started "a subscription list to collect the 
sum of $50,000 for the purpose of erect- 
ing a new theatre here. Crosby, who has 
ascertained the desire of the community 
to support his project, will incorporate a 
company and sell stock in the enterprise 
to the citizens of the town. 



"LOMBARDI" GETTING COAST COIN 

San Francisco. CaL, Aug. 3L — The re- 
ceipts for the past two weeks' performances 
of "Lombardi Ltd,'' at the Curran Theatre, 
were $27,000, a record amount. 



KELLARD OPENS SEPT. 7TH 

San Francisco. CaL, Aug. 31, — John E. 
Kellard, the tragedian, win open at the 
Columbia Theatre on Sept. 7th. 



PHIL BAKER LOSES CLOTHES 

Street and stage clothes, valued at more 
than $300 were stolen from the locker or 
Phil Baker, at the Century Roof last 
■week. Baker believes it to be the work 
of some one who hae a .personal grudge 
against him. Although there were more 
than $20,000 worth of clothes in other un- 
locked lockers, Baker's was forced open 
and everything taken. 



NEW ENGLISH PLAY OPENED' ■': 

Boston, Mass., Aug. 31.— "Clothes and 
the Woman," an English comedy in four, 
acts, by George Paston, had its American 
premiere here at the Copley Theatre .this 
week, and was well received because of its 
excellent acting. 

The story revolves about an authoress 
who is somewhat Bohemian, but who, be- 
cause of her careless attire, has but few 
admirers.' She takes the suggestion of a 
wealthy society woman and changes her 
costume to note the result. Thenceforth, 
the men follow ardently in her wake, and 
she receives many proposals of marriage. 
Knowing the cause of her sudden popular- 
ity, she accepts none of her admirers' 
offers, but invites them all to her studio, 
where she resumes her former dress and 
loses all her lovers except a Doctor Lenox, 
who thinks that a wife should be a real 
woman and not a fashion plate. 

It is a "talky" play, and furnishes good 
material for those who appear in the var- 
ious roles. Those in the cast were Jessa- 
mine Newcombe, E. E. Olive, Viola Roach, 
Cameron Matthews, Mary Hamilton, 
Leonard Craske, H. Conway- Wingfi'eld, 
Nicholas Joy, May Ediss, Nancy Steward 
and Eleanor Ellis. 



PLAN $3,ooo,ooo HOUSE 
Loa Angeles, Cal., Aug. 31. — Sid Gran- 
man has purchased a $1,000,000 lot at the 
corner of Hill and Sixth Streets here, with 
the intention of starting within the next 
sixty days, a theatre structure to cost 
$2,000,000 when completely equipped. - 

The theatre will occupy approximately 
one-third of a block and will have a seating 
capacity of 4,200. When work is 
started on the building, three shifts of 
workmen will be employed with the hope 
of rushing it to completion within eight 
months' time. A novel feature will be a 
compartment balcony, set above the main 
floor. Each compartment will be built in 
the shape of a chariot. 

The new theatre will be known as Gran- 
man's Metropolitan and will run high class 
moving pictures. A sixty piece symphony 
orchestra will furnish the musical program. 
The stage will be built so that the most 
spectacular and mammoth scenic produc- 
tions can be produced, if the occasion 
arises. 



"COME ALONG" OPENS WELL 

Altoona, Pa., Aug. 27. — The season at 
the Mishler Theatre was opened last night 
by "Come Along." a musical comedy, with 
Harry Bulger in the leading role, and 
under the management of Herman H. 
Moss, of New York. The play has been 
seen in New York, and is now on a coast 
to coast tour. 

The piece is built around the adventures 
of several doughboys in France, with the 
comedy element prevailing. The cast of 
the show, which is headed by Bulger and 
Dolly Gray, includes: The Misses Wood, 
Fuller, Evans, Jensen, DeParge, Brooks 
and Perkins, and Ed. Maiden, Syd Myers, 
Dan Dawson, John Neff, . Dan McNeil, 
J. B. Rigg and Galen Bouge. 

Moss, who owns and produced the show, 
will travel with it to the Coast. Smith 
and Harris are doing dancing specialties. 
The receipts for the night were $1,400, 
and the piece was well liked. Bulger has 
never been funnier in his life. 



FRISCO PLAYERS TO DO "HAMLET" 

San Francisco, CaL, Aug. 30. — The 
Players Club Theatre, which opens its 
season the first week in October, will pre- 
sent "Hamlet" as its opening play, with 
William Rainey in the leading role.. Tnis 
is the eighth year of the club's existence, 
and it has been forced to move its quarters 
from Clay Street to a larger theatre on 
Bush Street. The plans for the season 
include the presentation of operatic and 
high class dramatic and comedy produc- 
tions. 



"EYES OF YOUTH" OPENS 

Montreal, Can., Sept 1. — Smythe Wal- 
lace, who was selected to follow Lou Telle- 
gen in the leading role of "Blind Youth," 
opened his season here today. The show 
is to play several weeks on the road, then 
go to New York for a short run, after 
which there win follow a tour to the coast. 



BOSTON LIKES "HITCHY-KOO" 

■ Boston, Aug. 29.- — The ; new edition of 
"H itchy Koo," although it has far to go 
to eclipse former productions in its class, 
has made a decided .hit here and can hold 
on at the Colonial Theatre just as long 
as Hitchcock wants it to. 

Although the piece is not a stunner for 
novelty, Hitchcock has at least succeeded 
in putting old tricks into new wrappings. 
But there is also much in "Hitchy Koo" 
that is excellent. Altogether, it is that 
type of. show that is supposed to appeal 
to the t. b. m., with color and costumes 
of all kinds and a generous display of 
dainty lingerie.. 

Throughout, Hitchcock, himself pre- 
dominates. Before the curtain rises, the 
inimitable" Raymond struts down the aisle 
and starts things going from the audience, 
preparing the way for the opening scene 
which is the most novel offering in the. 
production. When he commands the cur- 
tain to rise, he suddenly finds himself on 
a dark stage, with black and blank sur- 
faces confronting him. He calls for a 
door, a window, a cab, a horse, a stage 
entrance, and each in turn appears as_ if 
by magic in successive lines of light "on 
what appear to be huge slates set before 
him. 

"Hitchy's Garden of Roses" introduced 
an attractive chorus of girls with Lillian 
Cooper in song, and with Simo'ne Cochet 
and Aleta Dove as diminutive lightning 
bugs. 

"Reubenville" was a satirical fling a 
prohibition, while a tabloid depiction of 
Thomas Burke's, .story, "Limehouse 
Rights," proved a striking bit. Hitchcock's 
portrayal of an English tourist in a steam- 
ship office in London was a feature of the 
performance, and novelty was furnished 
by the Indian dances of Oskomon and 
White Deer. Oskomon's "dance "of the 
five senses" displayed the rcdmanV lithe- 
someness and suppleness' in a way that 
made this an individual hit of the show. 

Pep was rather lacking in the scene, 
"A Corner of the Ritz." .The best musical 
number of the show was found in "Old 
New York." 

Contrasted with the noise and the bang 
of most of the music was a simple, senti- 
mental ballad entitled "An Old Fashioned 
Garden," sung in the first instance by 
Lillian Cooper Kendall and then again 
and again by Cassius M. Freeborn, the 
leader of the orchestra, to a big hand. 

Among others who scored success were 
Sylvia Clark, .Charles Howard. Mark 
Sullivan, Joseph Cook, Ruth Mitchell, 
Eleanor Sinclair and Duffy and Sweeney. 



TWO SHOWS TO CLOSE IN OMAHA 

Omasa, Neb., Aug. 28. — Two shows are 
scheduled to close their western tours in 
this city during the coming two weeks. 
Ruth Chatterton, who has. been playing 
with' "The Merrie Month of May," is slated 
..to close on Saturday night, August 30. A 
week later, on Saturday night, Henry Mil- 
ler will terminate the tour of "Moliere." 
Blanche Bates is appearing with him. 

The companies of .both the shows will 
immediately go Eart. - 



KEEPS APPOINTMENT BY AIR 
San. Francisco, CaL, Aug. 31.— Paul 
Engstrom, business manager of a Los An- 
geles film concern, had an appointment 
with Harry Levisbhn, manager of the 
Peterson Launch company. Due to the 
railroad strike, he feared he could not keep 
it until he hired an airplane to take -him 
to 'Frisco. By its use he succeeded in 
keeping the appointment. 



WRITES PLAY ABOUT STRIKE 

Eugenia Campbell, who will be remem- 
bered for her work in "Seven Keys to Bald- 
pate," has written a three act drama deal- 
ing with the actors' strike called "The 
Actor." It will be given a tryout by the 
Lynn Players, Lynn, Mass., this month. 



GALLO OPERA INCORPORATE 

The Gallo English Opera Company, 
managed by Fortune Gallo, was incorpor- 
ated last week. with a capital of $20,000. 
The incorporators were Fortune Gallo, B. 
Mills and S. De Cesare. 



September 3, : 1919 



jyMji MSmS&ES&MSSEP 




LOEW OPENS 

TWO NEW 

HOUSES 

PUSHING PANTAGES FIGHT 



Another step in his fight against Pan- 
tages was taken by Marcus Loew Mon- 
day when he opened two of his newly ac- 
quired houses. These, the Liberty, Cleve- 
land, and Colonial, Detroit, will furnish 
opposition to the two Miles theatres in 
those cities. The Miles theatres are af- 
filiated with' Pantages, and Pantages 
vaudeville is used; so that Loew's open- 
ing houses in Cleveland and Detroit con- 
stitutes an indirect blow at the Greek 
vaudeville magnate. 

At the Colonial, where the matinee 
prices are $.15 and $.23 at matinees and 
$.25, $.35 and $.50 at evening perform- 
ances, the personal appearance of Taylor 
Holmes is advertised, in conjunction with 
the showing of his picture, "Upside Down." 
Murray Leslie and Raymond Oswald, Ed 
Phillips, Carson and . Willard, Duffy and 
Montague, the Feraros, and a playlet en- 
titled "Just for Instance" constitute the 
vaudeville part of the programme. F. A. 
Russo is the new director of the orches- 
tra, and Wendell Phillips plays the pipe 
organ. 

Clark and McCullough, 'who were to 
have appeared with a legitimate produc- 
tion, are the featured performers at the 
Liberty. The actors' strike has necessi- ' 
tated their going into vaudeville. "Sum- 
mer Girls and Fall Guys," a musical tab- 
loid presented by Marty Brooks of the 
Putnam Building, with Cliff Dixon and 
William Barrows featured; Richard Mil- 
loy, Nora Allen,- Harrison and Halloway 
and Jimmie Cole complete the vaudeville 
bill there. Enid Bennett in "Stepping 
Out" is the feature photoplay attraction. 
The prices, at the Liberty are $.10 and 
$.15 at matinee performances and on 
evenings, Sundays and holidays are $.25 
and $.35. 

Frank Goodale, himself known as a 
performer, is the new manager of the 
house, which has been remodeled and re- 
decorated during the off season. 

Loew is conducting a campaign for pat- 
ronage in these cities, and his efforts are 
likely to be met with a counter attack for 
Pantages resents Loew's pushing westward. 



NEW ACTS 

"The Ballad of Redding Jail" is the 
title of a new act which J. Ellis Kirkham 
wrote, and is producing. It is a satire on 
the poem of that name and will be pro- 
grammed as a "Satire a la Vaudeville" by 
Kirkham. The cast follows : Lola Jenkins, 
Florence Brewer, Susan Stowell, June 
Francis and Mary Conklin. 

Francis and De Marr are having a new 
act written 'by William Russell Meyers, 
entitled "Air-O-Plain." 

Sam and Harry Lewis win be seen in 
the near future in a new act which Will- 
iam Russell Meyers is writing for them. 
One of the boys will work in blackface and 
the other in white. , 

Pratt and Sheils, man and woman, will 
be presented in a new act under the direc- 
tion of Tom Jones. .:,:• 

Reulah Kennedy, who was formerly 
with the act "The Girl in the Air,' is 
preparing to appear in a novelty two-a- 
day act with a new partner. 

Johnnie Robinson, the tenor, will open 
shortly on Keith' time in Hoboken with 
a new single. 

"The Ancient Rug With the Spirit of 
Buddha," is the title of a new act which 
Sheik Hadji Tahar is producing. The 
offering, in rehearsal at Unity Hall, was 
written by Tahar and Adolpti Adams. 

Kibel and Pauline will open on the 
Western Vaudeville time shortly with a 
new act. ' 



MAX HART STARTS NEW AGENCY 

Max Hart has started a new agency 
business which is to be operated sepa- 
rately from his vaudeville enterprises, 
and is now looking about for suitable of- 
fices. In it he is to make a specialty of 
musical comedy and light opera artists 
and has already under contract over a 
dozen of the best known comedians in 
this line. 

Hart has in the past" handled the busi- 
ness of a number of the big vaudeville 
comedians who have gone into .musical 
comedy and this field has increased so 
rapidly during the past year or so that 
he is planning to make a separate enter- 
prise of it. Associated with him will be 
John Johnson, who will be in charge of 
the new office to be opened as soon as an 
available location can be found. 



EDDIE KANE TROUBLE SETTLED 

Eddie Kane, of Kane and Herman, and 
his wife Maude, who have disagreed re- 
cently to the point' where the latter 
brought an action for a divorce through 
Harry Saks Hechheimer, have got together 
and settled their differences so completely 
that the court action has been discon- 
tinued. Kane, whose right name is Gold- 
man, is now with the "Hip Hip Hooray 
Girls," a burlesque show. ,-. - * 



SAYS ARNOLD IS COPYING 

George L. Pelletier has asked the X. V. 
A. to settle differences. between him and 
the. team of Jack and Eva Arnold, claim- 
ing that Arnold is doing a' character bit 
that he has been portraying for twelve 
years. Pelletier was first a member of 
the team of Miller and Pelletier and, in 
January 1918, was one of the Arnold trio. 
Since leaving the trio, he says he has 
heard the Arnold Trio using his old rou- 
tine word for word. 



PHIL. HOUSE OPENS WITH VAUDE. 

Philadelphia, Sept. 1. — According to 
announcement made by George W. Metzel 
today, manager of the Old Girard Avenue 
Theatre, Girard Avenue and Seventh 
Street, that house will re-open tomorrow 
afternoon presenting high class vaudeville 
booked through the B. F. Keith popular 
exchange. . . 



PERFORMERS MARRY 

Chicago, Aug. 31. — Marie Donahue, 
who is appearing here on Orpheum time 
with "Not Yet Marie," was quietly mar- 
ried to Charles .Olcott here early this week. 
Olcott has been doing "A Comic Opera in 
Ten Minutes" in vaudeville. 



A. & H. BUILDING NEW HOUSE 
Modesto, Cal„ Aug. 3L — Ackerman and 
Harris will add another theatre to their 
chain of hippodromes, when the $75,000 
theatre here is completed and ready for oc- 
cupancy in December. 



A L. SHAYNE STARTS BUSINESS 

Al Shayne .has opened a millinery shop 
on Broadway at Ninety -second street. 
His wife has the active management of the 
place, called the Rosella Shop. 



THE FLATBUSH REOPENS 

The B. S. Moss Flatbush Theatre, 
Brooklyn, has reopened its season with 
vaudeville and pictures. Edwin F. Reilly 
is again manager. 



ASHLEY HAS NEW PARTNER 

Dietrich in the act that formerly played 
under the team name of Skipper and 
Ashley. 

THELMA CARLTON RECOVERING 
Thelma Carlton is recovering from an 
attack of Bore throat and expects to re- 
open this week. 



BOOKERS HAND 

OUT SEASON 

ROUTES 



ACITVE AS SEASON OPENS 

The last week has been one of unusual 
activity as far as vaudeville bookings are 
concerned, many of which were held up 
awaiting Eddie Darling's return from 
overseas. When he did get back last week 
things began to move. 

Practically all big time houses now 
have acts on their bills that have just 
been given routes, among them being. The 
Runaway Girls, playing this week at the 
Palace; Korr and Weston, Jazzland Navy 
Eight, Davis and Darnell, Walter Brower, 
Emerson and Baldwin, Shaw aud Camp- 
bell, Jack Inglis, Sinclair and Gasper, 
Diamond and Uremia", Bordoni and Gitz 
Rice, DeWolf Girls, The Magic Glasses, 
Wheaton and Carroll, Cameron Sisters, 
Sissell and Blake, Lee Kohlman and com- 
pany, Marino and Malley, Lida McMillan, 
and company, Arthur Havell and com- 
pany, Gus Edwards, Jim the Jazz King, 
Langford and Fredericks, Lew Dockstader, 
Craig Campbell, Dooley and Sales, Leon 
Varvara, Sallie Fisher and • Company, 
Hugh Herbert and Company, Nat Xazarro, 
and band, Allan Rogers, and many others. 

Booking activities on the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit also are lively, and among the acts 
that have most recently been booked are 
the Seven Honey Boys, Mart ell e, Lambert 
and Ball, The Man Hunt, George Price, 
Bryant and Broderick, Ames and Win- 
throp, Fiank Crummit, Dunbar's Tennes- 
see Ten, Bert Fitzgibbons, Gallagher and 
Martin, Gertrude HolTman, and Indoor 
Sports. ' 

The next week promises to become even 
more active so far as booking is con- 
cerned and it will be at least a month be- 
fore the booking situation settles down to 
normal again. 



ARDATH ACTS GET 20 WEEKS 

••The Finani ieru" is the title of a new 
act which Fred Ardath has just put out. 
It was written by Ardath and the cast 
includes Matt Weill, Mike Alv in, Harry 
Johnson, Henri Legendre and Jack Ro- 
land. The turn has been given twenty 
weeks booking by the Keith office. 

"The Melody Shop" is another Ardath 
-act which Tom Fitzpatrick is booking. 
The cast includes Edward Menlove, Cole 
Carroll, Myra Kelley, Louise Beedles and 
Charles Clark. It opened Monday , in 
Hazeltown, Pa. 

SIDNEY PHILLIPS COMPLAINS 
Sidney Phillips has complained to the 
X. V. A. against an actor who calls him- 
self Ed Phillips, claiming that the latter 
is using a considerable portion of his rou- 
tine. Ed was playing McVickers in Chi- 
cago while Sidney was playing the State- 
lake, and it is claimed by the latter that 
both are using much the same material 
although it belongs to him. It is said that 
Ed once told the Kauffman Brothers that 
he was a brother of Sidney and that Sid- 
ney had given him permission to do the 
act. 



ROONEY PRODUCING ACTS 

Pat Rooney has decided to take another 
chance at the producing game, but having 
learned a lesson from his experience last 
year, is going about it in a different man- 
ner. This time he has written a number 
of musical acts,, all of which are now in 
rehearsal. But they are in the bands' of 
various producers. 

The first of these, "The Two Song- 
Books," a girl act with ten people, will 
be produced by Irwin Rosen, who pre« 
sented, "Kiss Me." 

In addition, Rooney is rehearsing a new 
playlet written for him by Edgar Allan 
Woolf, in which he, Marion Bent his wife, 
and four other women, totaling a cast of 
seven principals, will appear. This play- 
let has for its theme, Pat's well-known 
Bong, '/The Daughter of Rosie 0*Grady," 
and will be presented by a cast of four- 
teen, with a special orchestra. The of- 
fering is booked to open on the Keith 
time on September 22. The theatre has 
not yet been decided upon. This offering, 
according to Rooney, costs $15,000 to 
put on. 



SEA BURY & SHAW TO PRODUCE 

William Seabury and Billie Shaw are 
planning to produce a Broadway show in 
which they will star themselves. Miss 
Shaw is writing the book, lyrics and 
mnsic, finding time to do this although her 
vaudeville engagements keep her busy. 

SULLY AND WELLER TEAM-UP 

Joe Sully, formerly of the Al Shayne 
act, and Charles Weller, last with Al 
Herman, have teamed up and will do a 
comedy "wop" and "straight" act. Sally 
will play the "wop" part in the new act. 



WILL AID ACTOR'S FUND 

Daniel Frohman, president of the Ac- 
tors' Fund, announced early this week 
that William H. Taft, Charles E. Hughes, 
Charles H. Sabin, president, of the Guar- 
anty Trust Company; Henry P. Davidson, 
of J. P. Morgan Company, aud George T. 
Wilson, vice-president of the Equitable 
Life Assurance Society, have agreed to 
serve on. the executive committee of the 
Actors' National Memorial Fund. 



SAUBER HAS NEW ACTS 

Harry Sauber has the following new 
acts ready for the season's opening: 
"League of Nations," a minstrel act, 
which opens at the Palace, Staten Island, 
on the 28th, and "The Xew Model," a 
comedy fashion show, which opens Sept. 
1st at the Playhouse, Passaic, X. J. 

HOCHENBERG RETURNS TO JOB 

Milton Hochenberg, who was connected 
with the publicity department of the 
Orpheum Circuit in the Palace Theatre 
Building before joining the colors, has 
been discharged from the military service 
and resumed his former duties. 



WALTERS OPENS OWN OFFICE 

Boston, Sept. 1.— Louis E. Walters, 
formerly booking manager of the John 
Quigley circuit of theatres, has opened his 
own booking office at 180 Treinont street 
under the name of Louis E. Walters 
Amusement Co. 



ORPHEUM SIGNS OVERSEAS REVUE 

The Overseas' Revue, with Elizabeth 
Brice, Will Murrisey and a small company, 
has been booked to tour the Orpheum 
Circuit this season as a headline attrac- 
tion. 



N. V. A.. GETS MORE LIGHTS 

There is now more light on the subject 
at the N. V. A. That, is, the club has im- 
proved its lighting system, adding a num- 
ber of new electric fixtures on the mez- 
zanine floor and dining room. 

HARMON AMD O'CONNOR REUNITE 

Harmon and O'Connor, who split some 
months ago, have reunited again and are 
around New York breaking in a new act. 

MLNNET Jl AND SIDELU SAIL 

Minnetti art Sidelli sailed on Saturday 
for London, where they start a fifteen 
weeks' tour of the English variety houses. 

GET ORPHEUM ROUTE 
The team <Jf Hyama and Mclntyre hare 
been booked for tour over the Orpheum 
Circuit. 



"PH I i RE W *Wr"S 3#L l¥¥% R 



SeptemtVcrX 1919 




PALACE 



MeMahon and~Diamond opened the show 
and sad a big nit saf ely stored away at the 
close of their first number. From that time 
on they increased in populartiy, the rag 
doll dance scored strongly and Diamond's 
fine dancing was applauded to" the encore. 
Few opening acta bare sc ored like the Dia- 
mond offering. 

Lou Reed and Al Tucker, violinists, have 
some new numbers is their repertoire. Sev- 
eral need more rehearsing, for they were 
played indifferently. The balance of the 
Act, however, is good and they took a half- 
dozen encores. The. final number, with a 
singer in a box who rendered "Golden 
Gate," brought them back for numerous 
bows. 

Gallagher and Roller's "Battle of Whata- 
thense" has improved fifty per cent since 
it played this house a few months ago. 
There is a laagh in almost every line and 
Rolley is funnier than ever. The act is 
at present one of vaudeville's best laagh 
producing offerings and in running length 
and handling, it is timed right to the 
minute. 

Brendel and Burt Buffered not a bit by 
following the laughing act that preceded 
them, for, in an almost incredible space of 
time. Brendel had thft big audience laugh- 
ing at his antics folly' as heartily as it had 
at Rolley's. Miss Bnrt sings well and 
makes a clever foil for 1 Brendel, whose work 
as a Swedish rustic is excruciatingly funny. 
The dance bit at the act's finish, with the 
dozen or more comedy encores, is great. 

Charles King, after a few weeks' ab- 
sence, is back with his "Dream Stars" and 
closed the first part to(great applause. The 
cast of his act could hardly be improved 
upon and in the Misses Fleming, Chalfonte. 
Poe and HollyweH, he has four assistants 
who could carry a mnch lighter offering to 
success. King is doing some really excep- 
tional work in the act, he is singing better 
»n»„ ever and Ms dancing conld hardly be 
improved upon. Its mounting- is excellent 
and in every department it is all that conld 
be desired. 

"Topics of the Day" opened after inter- 
mission and this week is composed of about 
the best collection of witty sayings on cur- 
rent events that have been shown. 

"Chicken Chow Mein," Herman Tim- 
berg's big musical fantasy, with Jay Gould 
and Flo Lewis as the featured players, has 
been renamed and, as "The Runaway Girl" 
is a slightly improved offering. Gould and 
Lewis are on almost continuously from the 
rise of the curtain to its fall and whatever 
success the act scores is largely due to their 
efforts- The story of the piece is of little 
consequence and deals with a runaway girl 
from Philadelphia who seeks an engagement 
in a Chinese cabaret. Her sweetheart is 
looking for- her and finally finds her in 
the place, bat in the meantime she has met 
Jay, an entertainer in the place, and falls 
- in lore 'with Urn. A game of checkers 
played with the chorus girls as checkers, 
wins her for Jay. There ia a large chorus 
of clever and finely costumed gins in the 
piece, bat they have but little to do. A 
dancing girl who plays the violin was one 
of the bright spots in the act and the 
dancing syncopated tragedy which ends the 
act is clever, although not particularly orig- 
inal. Gould interpolated a number of bits, 
one about the Equity contract and another 
about playing the Colonial at a cut, both of 
which added nothing to either the value or 
humor of the scene. There are a half-dozen 
songs, none of which stood ont to - any 
particular extent; in tact, the entire score 
recalls one of the lines in a songwriting 
scene in the act wherein the composer says 
"No one ever beard of a- man being hung 
for stealing a song." 

The act is a big flash, but it misses in a 
number of important spots, and if it is to 
hold the place in vaudeville which its writer 
and producer evidently hopes for, some big 
and decided changes will be necessary. 

Ted Lewis and his Jan Band, held over 
for the second week, duplicated their big 
success of last week and scored one of the 
bis hits of the entire bin. W. V. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIJEWS 



(OootLnu^d on paav« •'.and l»k." 



- ~ RIVERSIDE 

The Breen Family, in a novelty joggling 
and ^«""»»»ir act, opened the show. There 
are a number of good bits in the offering, 
bnt the family attempts too mnch and the 
act runs too long. 

Donald Kerr and Effie Weston scored a 
hit of big proportions with their acrobatic 
dancing. There is a song or two in the 
act which waa fairly well rendered but the 
big feature' of their work is their dancing, 
which brought them a half dozen encores. 
The Jazxland Naval Octette, featuring 
Tom Devaney and Happy Stanley, _ ren- 
dered a repertoire of popular compositions 
with the snap and vim which characterizes 
all of the navy bands and orchestras. The 
violinist and tenor soloist who rendered a 
"Castles in the Air" number are worthy of 
special mention and the organization, as a 
whole, U excellent. In the early position, 
they scored strongly. 

The Klein Brothers, back at this house 
after a few weeks' absence, have brightened 
their "act perceptibly by the addition of 
some new and well handled material. Sev- 
eral of the bits done for encores were par- 
ticularly good and brought them back time 
and time again. A novelty song called "Up 
In The Air Boys" and sung for the final 
encore, is one of the best bits of the 
entire act. 

So long as the present generation con- 
tinues to patronize vaudeville, Joe Howard 
need not worry about writing new song 
hits, for his old successes are as welcome 
now as when they were in the heyday of 
their big popularity. Practically the entire 
act consists of the singing of the old How- 
ard songs, and the well-remembered "Hello 
My Baby," "I Wonder Who's Kissing Her 
Now" and "Dreaming," were applauded as 
enthusiastically as when Howard, many 
years younger, was singing them in his old 
musical comedy successes. Miss Clark ren- 
dered a clever novelty number about "Story 
Book" days and displayed some beautiful 
and striking costumes dnring the singing 
of the old song choruses. Audiences never 
seem to tire of the Howard melodies. 

Mile. Nitta-Jo has in her short stay in 
this country mastered the English language 
sufficiently to enable her to render half of 
her repertoire in English. Her selection of 
songs U good and in spite of her dialect her 
enunciation is excellent. She has dis- 
carded the patriotic songs which she ren- 
dered so effectively when at this theatre 
before, and even though the war be over, 
the retention of one for her finish might be 
advisable. 

Davis and Darnell's "Birdseed" is a com- 
edy skit in which the man in attempting 
to make the acquaintance of a young miss, 
poses as a seed salesman from' Brazil. Yes, 
you quessed it. "Charley's Aunt" has been 
remembered by the writer of the Bkit, who 
drags in the "where the nuts come from" 
joke. There are other bits in the piece 
fully as ancient aa this one, yet, in spite 
of all that, the act is a good one. Davis 
has ability, he pats his speeches over and 
he is not particularly well supported either. 
Miss Darnell does not enunciate clearly, 
neither does she use sufficient vocal strength 
and as a result, a considerable portion of 
her lines were missed altogether. With the 
elimination of the old gags and some new 
material substituted the act will be greatly 
improved. 

Prior to the rise of the curtain on the 
Clark and Bergman act, Davis announced 
that Bergman was suffering from a sore 
throat and asked the .audience's indulgence. 
"A Ray of Sunshine" is the name of the 
act and it is all that, from every possible 
standpoint. Finely staged and mounted and 
entertaining from start to finish, it ranks 
with vaudeville's best offerings. 

Catherine Powell, in some new and well 
put on dances, closed the show. W. V. 



COLONIAL 

Cosier and Lusby found the opening 
spot very easy going, for there were very 
few, if any, in the audience, that were 
being seated while they were .on. The 
young man plays the piano capably, and 
pleased with his singing. The lady mem- 
ber of the duo ia an attractive young 
miss who dances- very prettily on her 
toes, and did quite a bit of eccentric 
stepping. Considering the type of act 
and the position it waa in, it gave a 
very good account of itself. 

Harry Kranx and Bob La Salle have 
cut out moat of their song routine and 
are *fa"T , *T'g in the latter part of the 
offering. And to give them due credit, 
they not only raised a near-riot, but 
stopped the show, and then some. The 
boys, sang with their customary pep, and 
the dancing, which was done by one of 
them, waa very good. While the other 
announced in song what the next num- 
ber would be, he imitated Pat Rooney, 
George White, the MoBconi Brothers, and 
then "knocked them off their seats" by 
out Friscoing Frisco. 

The De Wolf Girls, assisted by Richard 
Conn, who directed in the orchestra, of- 
fered a very pretty song and dance skit 
called "Clothes, Clothes, Clothes," which 
is worked around a song about clothes. 
While the girls' voices leave much to be 
desired, they deliver their numbers ex- 
ceedingly well and dance nicely. . They 
also feature a very good wardrobe. 

Moss and.Frye are a colored team of 
that comedy calibre which will always 
fetch laughter, no matter how often they 
have been seen before. They know the 
value of fresh material and with the ex- 
ception of a few old stand-bys, the two 
are always putting over new gags. It 
has been said that, as an extempore col- 
ored comedian, Frye is in a class with 
Bert Williams. 

Nonette, back in vaudeville after play- 
ing in "Somebody's Sweetheart" and be- 
coming somebody's wife, scored one of 
the biggest hits of the bill, for in the 
closing position of the first half, she was 
called back for a . curtain speech, and 
then had to render another number for 
an encore. ■ She was programmed to be 
accompanied by Antonio Bufunno, but 
announced at tile opening of her act that 
he could not appear and that Jerry 
Donegan would assist her, although handi- 
capped by lack of rehearsals. However, 
Donegan assisted capably. Nonette ren- 
dered a few numbers, classical and pop- 
ular, on the violin, and also sang in a 
fine manner. 

Clifton . Crawford opened the vaude- 
ville after the Topics of the Day, and 
was compelled to take an . encore. He 
offered his "souse" bit, the sneeze-song, 
which had a. few men, (not women), in 
hysterics, some dancing and singing. 
Crawford should put his encore number, 
in which he showed how Ruth St. Denis 
would interpret a recitation by dancing, 
into his regular routine, for if s a dandy. 
"The Magic Glasses," a dramatic play- 
let by Frances Nordstrom, pleased. It "is 
the old -story of .two men and one girl, 
- one of the men rich, and the other poor, 
but both in love with the girl. She does 
not know who to pick, so, by looking 
through -a pair of magic spectacles, she 
sees what the future would be if she 
was to marry either one. 

Anna Wheaton and Harry Carroll, who 
are doubling at the Royal, offered their 
song and dance routine and stopped the 
show. 

The Dennis Brothers closed the show 
with their 'revolving ladder offering. It 
contains a thrill at every turn. 

G. J. H. 



LEXINGTON THEATRE 

(Ac'tor.' Equity Show) . 

Equity, for its third week's, show, has a 
program that makes any other vaudeville 
show in town look weak. ," ; 

After an exceptionally well rendered 
overture,, the performance was started by 
"The Equity Chorus," composed of the 
girls from such shows as "Chu Chin Chow," 
"The Winter Garden," and "Oh, What a 
Girl," augmented by many others. 

Ernest Glendening, billed as the second 
number on the program, made a little 
speech in which he said that his part of 
the entertainment would be to act aa an- 
nouncer, which he accordingly did. 

Gladys Bice, a daughter of John C. Rice, 
followed with a high class singing spe- 
cialty, in which she offered a selected cycle 
of high class popular numbers. She had 
to respond to an encore. 

Adele Rowland, with her crinky hair, 
pretty smile and overflow of personality, 
came next and offered a number of popular 
comedy song . successes. She just spread 
good cheer throughout the audience and 
was also forced to take an encore. 

Ada Lewis and John E. Hazzard offered 
a - travesty on the eternal triangle, that 
brought forth roars of laughter. Their an- 
tics were received with favor, and they had 
to take eeveral extra bows. 

Lionel Barrymore, assisted by Doris Ran- 
kin, Albert Philips, James Bradbury, Sr.. 
George W. Howard, Tom Kerrigan and 
Louise Maclntoch , enacted the last act of 
"The Copperhead" They held the audi- 
ence spellbound throughout, and at the 
conclusion, Barrymore had to take about a 
dozen bows, and was forced to make a cur- 
tain speech. 

'Following intermission, "The Equity 
Minstrels," with Tom Lewis, Billy Clark, 
James J. Corbett, Hal Shelly and Ed Gar- 
vie as principals, and Sam Ash, Sydney 
Jaryis, Sam Weston, Bob Adams, John 
Shanks, John Roberts, James Driscoll, Poul 
Porcasi, Henry Vincent, Kenneth Minnas- 
sian. Roy Purviance, Dan Healy and Kuy 
Kendall, as circle men, aided by 100 voices 
in the chorus, held sway, and it sure was 
some minstrel show. They conld rival any 
now in existence. 

Bay Raymond, assisted by Percy Wen- 
rich, offered a number of songs with a bit of 
comedy thrown in. The interruption was 
caused by a' gentleman whose name was 
Eddy something or other. Raymond had 
to respond to an encore. ■ - 

Dorothy. Dickson and Carl Hyson offered 
a dancing specialty of which the outstand- 
ing feature was her 'high kicking and that 
peculiar restlessness of her shoulders, which 
kept moving all the time. They opened 
with a high kinking exhibition by Miss 
Dickson, followed by a waltz number and 
closed with a fox trot. They were well 
received. 

Fred Hildebrand, who, we believe, has 
been seen hereabouts before he became a 
regular actor, entertained with his foolish- 
ness for a while. Hildeb rand's act con- 
sists of a number of borrowed bits and 
some original comedy business, which he 
combines very neatly. into a laugh winning 
act 

Louise Groody, with Hal Skelley, offered 
a "boy and girl" act that was well liked. 
Skelley's voice is rather weak for the size 
of the house, and, consequently, he could 
not be heard very wen. Miss Groody is a 
graceful dancer with a little 'bit of a 
"shimmy." ■ / • - . ~> 

The show was closed by a dramatic ren- 
dition of the actors' side of the strike situ- 
_ at ion , built upon Marc Anthony's burial 
speech over the body of Caesar. Brandon 
Tynan, assisted By all the Equity members 
who could be crowded upon the stage, put 
this over with a bang. It was a real mob 
scene, with the howling populace replaced 
by a body of men and women demanding 
their rights. It thrilled the audience; and, 
when it was all over, they stood up and 
cheered for a full minute. S. K. 



September 3, 1919 



NEW YORK CLIPPER 




ORPHEUM 

The bill at this house possesses •unique 
feature in that the three acta which share 
the headline honors are all danana; turns. 
The Moaconi Brothers, Frisco, and Meyers 
and Noon are the acts which MmW 
terpeicbore*n art, while Ruth Budd also 
essays a few steps. 

At the Monday night performance the 
bill received such a shaking-tip that the 
Drogramme was almost unrecognisable SB 
far as the order of the acts was concerned. 
Frank Crumit, slated to occupy spot num- 
ber two, opened the show, and Meyers 
and Noon, billed to follow him, moved up 
a peg. Pielert and Scdfidd, who were 
supposed to open the show -dosed, and 
Ruth Budd, originally scheduled to dose, 
went on in third position. Julia Kelety 
and Langford and Fredericks, billed six and 
seven, respectively, exchanged places. 

Frank Crumit is a fellow with a pleasing 
personality and a quiet manner that winB 
favor. He sings a repertoire of varied song 
numbers, accompanying himself "P°n ■ 
guitar and then upon a ukelele. A few 
stories are offered and Ms delivery to like 
the rest of his work, creditable. 

Ernestine Meyers and Paisley Noon pre- 
sented a dance act and found the second 
peg on the programme a difficult one. Fol- 
lowing an introductory tune by Noon, there 
was a double dance to waits time, and 
then what was announced as the "Hell-cat 
Dance" by the woman. A song and dance 
by Noon was followed by an Oriental num- 
ber by Miss Meyers. For some reason or 
other, certain gestures caused laughter. 
There were two more dance numbers done 
together and zealous work on the part of 
both members of the duo saved them.. 

Ruth Budd starts with a song, does a 
bit of a dance and then goes into the 
acrobatic portion of ber offering. The 
latter part is the feature of the turn and 
quite a few thrills are offered. Miss Buddjs 
work on the flying rings and a rope is 
excellent. 

Olsen and Johnson, are two young men 
who inject quite a punch into their rendi- 
tion of a repertoire of suitable numbers. 
They team well and irrdude a few novd 
sdections which they always put over 
nicely. Tbey scored a great hit 

Frisco closed the initial section of the 
show with his dance offering, which has 
undergone a few changes. The turn is now 
somewhat different from the one first pre- ■ 
sented at another house last season as far 
as details are concerned, although built 
along the same lines. Lioretta McDermot 
now tries a song and the finishing number 
has been altered. Frisco still calls for well 
known dancers to imitate and still waits 
for someone to call Pat Rooney's name. It 
really doesn't matter whether Rooney'g 
appellation is called out or not, for Frisco 
invariably imitates him, but, at this per- 
formance, someone did ask to nave him 
impersonated and Frisco "obliged." There 
was also an imitation of George White and 
a burlesque on Both St. Dennis; which is 
not funny. 

Howard Langford and Anna Fredericks 
have a skit entitled "Shopping," from the 
pens of Langford and Joseph L. Browning. 
The team is a dever one and the material 
was handled capably, 

Julia Kelety sang a few songs in English 
and French with satisfactory results. She 
has a voice that carries well and she in- 
jects a considerable amount of energy into 
the renditions of "her pieces. She, began 
with a ballad and followed with a talk and 
song in French. Another selection in our 
language was followed by a "Frenchie" 
ballad, sung in English and French. 

The Mosconi Brothers, in the semi-wind 
up, had to work hard to -get over, but of 
course they succeeded, although the ap- 
plause was not as great as that usually 
accorded them. The fact that there had 
been a goodly amount of dancing before 
probably dampened the ardor of 'the 
audience. 

Pielert and Scofield dosed with a jug- 
gling and balancing act. I. S. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS I 

•— XC— bbmmJ hmtm P— ■■ « ssaTs) '"" """ 

■ 1 ■ ' - , » >_- * 



ALHAMBRA 

Alfred Farrell and Company, the latter 
being a young lady who does more than 
assist Farrell, offered a novd drawing skit 
for the opening act. Landscapes, seascapes 
and sketches were artistically pictured in 
various colored rags. Farrell also did one 
cartoon, starting by writing a few num- 
bers in various positions on the chart and 
with a few' strokes of his brush, converting 
them into the cartoon. The lady also dis- 
played ability in the art of "Bag-picking." 

Stanley and Birnes, two neat appearing 
young men in tuxedos, offered an eccentric 
dance act and scored. 

Arthur Havd and Company presented 
Will M. Cressy's "Playmates," a very 
pleasing comedy playlet which is excel- 
lently handled by Havd and a dandy cast 
consisting of another young man, a butler 
and a woman. The young man is a pam- 
pered son of a rich woman and acts the 
type commonly termed a "sissy." His 
doting mother decided to get him a play- 
mate, and secnres one from an orphan 
asylum. The playmate, in the person of 
Havel, arrives, and they become acquainted. 
Incidentally they go through a boxing- 
match which is the surprise of Havel's life, 
for the other turns out to be his superior 
with the gloves. After rendering a~ few 
songs with Havel at the piano, the other 
goes to sleep and Havel, after controlling 
an impulse to punch him, puts his arm 
around him and deeps also. Havel is a 
comedian of no mean merit and the sup- 
port which is given him by the others, 
especially the young man, is all that can 
be desired. 

Henry Lewis, doubling at the Royal, has 
discarded his langh-shop drop and cash- 
register and without them stopped the 
show. He now announces at the begin- 
ning of his act that there will not be any- 
thing suggestive or objectionable in his 
offering and that he is sorry to disappoint 
the audience. .Whether the "Squidulum" 
does this to air his opinion of vaudeville 
audiences, or for comedy purposes, wo do 
not know. But he certainly does get away 
with the gag. He has also added a number 
Of new "titititela" to his act, and most of 
them are very good. In addition to these, 
he has a lot of ' new gags and all new 
songs. 

Gus Edwards, assisted by Vincent 
O'Donnell, Alice Furness and' Beatrice 
Curtiss, closed the first half and in that 
position scored a solid hit, for they were 
compelled to take a few encores. Aa a 
singing act the offering to good, but when 
it comes to putting over comedy, Edwards 
is not aa good as he would have others, in 
addition to himself, believe.' His attempts 
at extempore comedy are of absolutely no 
value to the act and should be emitted. 

The Three Rubes, Bowers, Walters and 
Crocker, offered their novelty tumbling, 
acrobatic dancing skit. The trio go 
through a routine of sensational tumbling 
feats and, at this house, repeated the ap- 
plause hit which they generally score. 

The Barr Twins, assisted by Bnd 
. Bernie at the piano, who looks enough like 
Ben Bernie to be related to him, gave a 
good account of themselves with their 
dancing. The girls have a very pretty 
wardrobe, which they display to good ef- 
fect. Their dancing to also 'good and 
Bernie rendered capable assistance at the 
piano. 

Pat Booney and Marion Bent did not 
mind the closing spot, for had they so de- 
sired they could have made an all night 
party of the show. At the close of their 
act, not one person in the entire audience 
was seen to rise, or even make a move 
towards leaving. They took two encores 
and after imitating Frisco, Pat was called 
back again. He will open in a new act 
soon. G. J. H. 



ROYAL 

Camilla's Birds opened the show with an 
exhibition of intelligence and beauty. The 
act, well put on and beautifully framed, 
was a suitable opening" act for the first 
show of the season, which was presented to 
a capacity audience. 

Alice Hamilton in "A Little Breath of 
Lavender and Old Lace," offered a mono- 
logue dealing with modern ideas, as com- 
pared with the good old-fashioned methods. 
Her talk to rather witty and has a dash of 
' truth to spice it, which makes it not only 
entertaining bnt interesting. She score! 
a large hit and had to respond to an encore. 

Columbia and Victor, presented by Barto 
and Clark, have a real novelty act, which 
to a godsend, for real novelties are scarce. 
The scene shows the interior of a Victrola 
Shop, with two huge machines In the * 
foreground. One of the machines is male 
and the other female, being characterised 
appropriately as "Columbia" and "Victor." 
They open with some talk about their 
journeys since last they saw each other in 
the shop. After a while the doors of the 
machines open and Barto and Clark .step 
out, he dressed as a phonograph, with 
records banging all over him and she in a 
neat, abbreviated costume of brown. Tbey 
offered a selection of songs and dances that 
is bound to please the most critical audi- 
ence and scored a tremendous hit. 

Lieut. Noble Stode and "Eubie" Blake 
offered a singing and piano act that took 
the audience by storm. These men have 
the right idea of putting over songs, and 
they not only syncopate, but harmonize at 
the same time, which to a rarity. Their 
offering consisted of a number of special 
and original songs, well delivered. ' They 
scored a huge success, taking two encores. 
The "over the top" number is a classic and 
was received with applause. 

Anna. Wheaton and Harry Carroll fol- 
lowed with a singing and dancing turn. 
Miss Wheaton has a pleasing voice and 
dances rather well. Carroll to popular as 
a song writer, which two facts- combined 
form the basis for the act. They declined 
an encore because they had another en- 
gagement to fill. 

Following intermission and appearing 
out of their turn, due to their inability to 
arrive on time, George and Paul Hickman. 
in. a comedy blackface turn, gained a good 
many toughs for their labors. Their act 
consists mostly of a travesty on the drama 
as it flourishes in the rural sections of our 
country, or as it is supposed to exist there. 
The bits of business won laughs galore i 
from an audience that was both generous 
and enthusiastic. 

Lee Kohlmar and Company in The Two 
Sweethearts," was bound to appeal to this 
audience and did so. The playlet, a draw- 
ing of Jewish life, tells the story of a man 
who to willing to sacrifice everything for 
his sister's happiness. He does not even 
hesitate at giving up his own sweetheart in 
order that his sister might win a husband. 
Of course, everything comes out ail right 
in the end. Kohlmar, as the hero, does 
good work and to ably supported by his 
company of two women and one man. The 
man does especially good work. The only 
thing against the act is its age. 

Henry "Squidgulum" Lewis dosed the 
show, kidded and fooled areund for a while 
and then walked off with a huge hit. With 
clever material and a manner of delivery 
all his own he had things rather hia own 
sweet way. He is a nut among nut 
comedians. The closing: position proved 
Kttle more difficult for him than any other, 
aLd not a person left while be was on. 

__: s. k. 

NEW DANCE ACT COMING 

Georgie and Evelyn Jewell are pre- 
paring a new act for vaudeville, called 
"Danceland." 



EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 



Labor Day saw the inauguration of the 
new policy at this house and a large crowd 
turned out to witness what was actually a 
big time performance. "Wagon Tracks," 
the latest William S. Hart nictuft, was the 
feature, and there, were six acta aa well aa 

a shorter film. ' 

'Bert Eerie and Hia Six Girls offered a 
musical act that scored a good sized bit in 
the opening spot. Barle to an expert on 
the banjo and the girls perform excellently 
on various instruments. All of the selec- 
tions rendered were ensemble numbers, the 
nearest approach to a solo being some trick 
work on the banjo by the principal, who 
coupled some patter with it 

The company led off with a march tune, 
followed by a well known folk song, after 
which came some descriptive work on the 
banjo by Earle. Several popular tunes were 
then rendered, the troupe dosing with a 
jazzy selection given aa an encore. The 
girls are "Bee" Bancroft, Nancy Thompson, 
Bernice Cooper, Lottie Thompson. Helen 
Arts and Grace Abbott, who play the 
clarinet, tenor saxophone, alto saxophone, 
banjo, violin and piano respectively. 

Regal and Moore give a little vaudeville 
all by themselves, laying particular stress 
upon the acrobatic portion of the act. They 
are a likable pair and have several stunts 
. that are really thrilling. They began with 
a few simple palming stunts, introduced In 
a bit of a song. Then came a sort of 
travesty on the ballad singer, also of little 
importance. A few lines that mentioned a 
wop comedian were followed by the acro- 
batic work, and some » song bits included 
here and there in the offering. The dosing 
stunt got them a tremendous round of 
applause and they stopped the show. 

■Helen Gleason and Company, the latter 
designating a young man who played the 
only other role in the playlet besides that 
of the principal, presented a playlet by 
Arthur Garrett entitled "Stateroom 19." 
At first it looked as though a bedroom 
playlet was to be offered, but it turned out 
to be a really clever sketch that might have 
been marred very easily by suggestive lines 
or business. 

Ames and Winthrop offered a comedy 
skit which met with a fair amount of ap- 
proval There are a few dever bits, but 
the main subject about which the comedy 
is woven appears to exhaust 'itself quickly 
for, after the first few moments, the offer- 
ing lags. As a matter of fact, it is more 
the way in' wBich the material is handled 
than the material itself upon which the act 
depends. The finish, consisting of a dance 
farce, to somewhat weak, due to the fact 
that so many similar bits have been seen. 

Al Shayne is a dever Hebrew comedian 
and has a capable assistant. The material 
in the act is also clever, but Shayne resorts 
to a performance that may best be char- 
acterized by the word "cheap," Through- 
out the act be mingles with bis English, 
bits of talk and words in Jewish, aa well 
as a song in that language. The greater 
part of the audience here did not under- 
stand what he was talking or singing about, 
but the writer did, and the material re- 
ferred to is, to say the least, indelicate. 
Certain bits would certainly not meet with 
approval if translated. Shayne seemed to 
be willing to * work and took numerous 
encores, the last few of which were un- 
called for. Incidentally, Shayne's assistant, 
who is "planted" and dispenses "wop" 
comedy, gives a sufficiently dever perform- 
ance to merit hra name being placed with 
Shayne's on the billing. 

BlUIe Shaw Is a girl who presents a 
good appearance, dances excellently, has 
two capable assistants and a findy staged 
act. Closing the vaudeville portion of the 
show, this act scored solidly. The audi- 
ence seemed to be somewhat tired when this 
set started, largely because of die fact that 
Shayne had kept it waiting when it didn't 
want to wait. Miss Shaw scored sn in- 
dividual triumph and her two assistants 
were of material aid. The turn waa a fall- 
sized bit. LB. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 




AMERICAN 
Out Half) 

Madame Dollar's Peta, consisting of a vari- 
ety of dogs, pleased In the opening position 
with a routine of stunts. A revolving table 
and a sliding board are the main apparatuses 
used In the act, and although tbe routine was 
not ont of tbe ordinary run of dog acts, tbe 
animals went through it without a slip, doing 
their work well. 

Kahn and Soone, man and woman, did a 
little better In tbe second spot than most acts 
at this bouse generally do. Both have fairly 
good singing voices and tbe man's whistling 
was efflective. Tbe patter and comedy nave 
a good deal of room for improvement. Tbe 
latter Is overdone Is delivery and tbe patter 
contains gags that are cither old, or of no 
use ss laugh-getters. Tbe team has ability 
and should get better material. 

Mack and Velmar, also man and woman, 
followed tbe comedy film. Tbe girl. Is at- 
tractive and dresses welL Tbe man takes off 
a "souse" all through tbe offering, bat would 
do well to leave out tbe alcoholic touch In 
singing bis two ballads. He possesses a good 
falsetto and the girl supports him well at the 
piano. She also pleased with one bit on the 
violin. They also use- some talk In which 
they put over a few good gags- 

Jarrow opened to a skeptical audience and 
received very little applause for his card 
stonts, but won tbem over after doing his 
lemon stunt. . The audience applauded his ' 
gags, especially those about tbe house being 
asleep. Jarrow- is not only a clever magician, 
but a performer wbo knows the secret of 
showmanship nnd uses It throughout his offer 

Hfc. 

Tbe Five American Girls followed with a 
musical offering. All tbe gl.is work In colo- 
nial wigs and costnmee. Their playing Is 
very ordinary, although they are headlining 
at this bouse. They use tbe saxophone, cor- 
net, violin, French hern and piano. They 
would do well to work out a better selection 
of numbers than their repertory contains at 
present. 

Mildred Sogers is an attractive little girl 
who announces that she can't sing, but will 
show a few steps in dancing. ' She lived up 
to ber promise. Sbe opened with a good soft- 
shoe waits clog, did an oriental eccentric 
dance and then forgot that sbe couldn't sing 
and offered a "kid" song. However, tbe song 
was a comedy number which didn't require a 
voice, and the andlence forgave her. She 
closed with a dandy buck and wing dance 
which netted ber a big hand. 

Pearl Abbott and Company offered a serio- 
comic sketch tbat went over for much ap- 
plause. The plot of the playlet la on the 
eternal triangle — the oldest of themes. Miss 
Abbott plays ber role wen, and la given 
capable support by the other two. 

O'Nell and Avery closed the show with a 
comedy black-face offering. The two have 
some good gags In their act and also do some 
dancing that gets over. In the closing posi- 
tion, they held the house and took a big 
band. G. J. H. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

(Las* Half) 

The Nippon Duo opened the show with an 
exhibition of musical fand acrobatic skill that 
is not only entertaining, but is novel, aa well. 
They scored heavily. 

Second on the list were Tbe Dunn Sisters 
in their conglomeration of song, dance and 
comedy. They sang, talked and danced their 
way into a nit and an encore. They were the 
first daclng act on a bill that was too full of 
dancing, if anything. 

Lee Kohlmar and Company, in bis well- 
known playlet of Jewish life. Two Sweet- 
hearts," followed. They scored a bit. 

The rin For Boys. In dress suits, came next 
with a dandy double dancing act. The boya 
are clever dancers, though, like most all 
good dancers, poor singers. Their steps are 
difficult and novel, which adds to their value. 
They had to take an encore, in which the 
high kicking of the smaller of the boya was 
a revelation. 

DuVal and Symondt, following with a song, 
talk and dance act! would have found It 
rather rough going, tout for their excellent 
comedy material, which they handle wonder- 
fully and which sent} them over for a great 
big hit. Their act concerns a newly married 
pair of TaudevUllans who have their first 
quarrel la public. 

Rose and Moon, following so many dancing 
acta, succeeded in scoring despite the disad- 
vantage. Their danplng was swift, snappy 
nnd well done. Aiso'they are great favorites 
with their audience, land they scored a huge 
bit. The set Is excellently staged and the 
woman of the turn wears some wonderful 
gowns. 

Lew Dockstader needs no introduction, nor 
explanation. His name alone tells the re- 
sult of bis appearance. Let it be said, though, 
that never In his experience has the reviewer 
seen anyone get so many laughs from origi- 
nal material as Dockstader did. He is a real 
artist. r 

Ed. Janls and Company, in a dancing act, 
would have flopped terribly, had not Dock- 
stader broken the monotony. See New Acts. 

S. K. 




FOX'S CROTONA 

(Last Half) 

The Hayataka Japs opened tbe show with 
an acrobatic act that consisted very largely 
of rlsley work. The two men are well formed 
and work In an easy-going, yet business-like 
manner. The matinee audience here consisted 
largely of youngsters partial to acrobatic 
work, and the offering went over with a bang, 
scoring one of the hits of the bin. While 
there is nothing sensational in the act, it 
will make a satisfactory opening number on 
any of the better small time programs. 

Kenny and McCane, a man and woman, do. 
a song, talk and dance act which lacks punch. 
They open with some patter that la devoid 
of bright lines, and follow with a current 
"Frenchle" song. There is a. ballad by tbe 
woman, followed by another by the man, using 
an amber spot, after which they do a song and 
dance in old-fashioned costumes. There are 
a few hits of patter, here and there, through- 
out the act, but the talk is far from funny. 
Tbe singing Is ordinary, but the dancing Is 
somewhat better. 

Kllda Morris was a bit from tbe start and 
completely stopped tbe show, it being neces- 
sary for her to deliver a curtain speech before 
Bhe was permitted to depart. She started 
with a comedy number that has been heard 
rather frequently before, but put It over 
nicely. Her second selection was liked, as 
was the "Quaker" song, which was good for 
a laugh or two. Tbe "Darkey" selection 
which closed, was followed by much applause. 
While Miss Morris registered a great bit, 
there is much lacking In ber offering. She 
should include some real live patter and one 
or two new songs, substituted for some of 
those sbe now uses, would also help. 

The Aristo Quartet, two men and two 
women, sang a number of operatic pieces and 
were liked. The tenor has a good voice and 
the other members of the company also sang 
Weil. The andlence applauded generously at 
tbe conclnaion. - ' 

Milt Collins delivered a monologue which 
Included a few witty bits and very many 
that lacked cleverness. For the greater part, 
the talk Is dull and slow. The audience 
waited patiently for some real humor, but 
Collins wandered on in the same manner and 
the act became really monotonous. Collins 
gives the impression that he really could put 
over bright material, bnt with bis present act. 
be will And troubles a-plenty on tbe small 
time. 

"Tate's Fishing," a sort of comedy playlet, 
closed tbe show and held the crowd in, be- 
cause they were waiting for the feature pic- 
ture which Is always shown after the vaude- 
ville at this bouse. Otherwise, the audience 
would probably have walked ont. The sketch 
consists of numerous bits, centered about a 
ashing- expedition of two men. The different 
parts of the offering ore Just tbrown together 
without a real sense of unity, and the finish 
Is abrupt. The turn ranks high for monotony, 
and the crowd was much relieved when it 
was over. I. S. 



KEENEY'S 

(Last Half) 

Mabel Llnd opened the show with a char- 
acter singing and dancing act. She is a clever 
comedienne with a well-written vehicle, and 
the ability to put her numbers across. She 
does some excellent clog dancing and scored 
so heavily that she hsd to respond to an 
encore. 

Halsey Mohr and his blond assistant, Miss 
Saxon, came next. Mohr, a songwriter, uses 
all of hla own numbers in the act. Miss 
Saxon is n passable clever comedienne, who 
makes up In appearance and personality what 
she lacks In talent Their voices are poor; 
that much can not be denied. But they know 
how to get their stuff across nicely. 

Berzac's Circus is an ordinary animal act, 
with two ponies, a dog, and the usual back- 
lng mule. The two ponies go through a few 
tricks, after which tbe ever faithful and 
laugh-get-able burrow was exhibited, and the 
usual hackneyed "try and ride him" stunts 
were gone through, much to the amusement 
of the audience. The act was well liked, win- 
ning laughs and applause aplenty. 

Mills and Lockwood, two rube comics, fol- 
lowed. Their act consists mostly of cross- 
fire remarks, and several back-to— the-farm 
songs. They, sing passably well, and their 
cross-fire Is just hot enough to keep folks 
laughing. They close with a yodeilng number 
tbat won them an encore. 

"Very Good Eddie." was tbe feature act. 
It is a musical comedy tabloid, employing six 
principals and eight chorus girls. The act 
is well staged, and has a well written foun- 
dation. The story Is that of two married 
couples who contrast so ridiculously as to be 
ludicrous. The became estarnged. the hus- 
band of one, finding himself with the wife of 
the other. Their predicament is made the 
more unbearable because of their Inability to 
help themselves. Things are straightened ont 
satisfactorily though, and all ends happily. 

"Nugget Nell." a burlesque on the "Wild 
West' movies, was the feature picture. 



CITY 

(Last Half) 

The Burns Brothers followed the films with 
a short routine of strong-man work. While 
they showed nothing- sensational, or, for that 
matter, any stunt that was out of the ordi- 
nary run of strong-man acts, they received 
quite a bit of aplpausc for their lifting and 
balancing work. 

Beulah Pearl Is an attractive woman and 
possesses a pleasing voice, but her cycle of 
songs need more to tbem, and one with a 
little pep to It will greatly aid the act. She 
opened with a song of welcome for herself, 
telling about a party which she attended and 
where sbe had to sing, and then goes Into 
her routine. Billy Rhodes also uses a like 
bit for bis opening number. Miss Pearl 
offered a number about taxing beautiful girls, 
one about gossip, and then sprang a very old 
gag, closing with a fast "Sweetie number. 

Lillian McNeil and Shadow, the latter con- 
sisting of a man, offered a dancing skit and 
gave a good account of themselves. Tbe man 
would do well to practice up in his first single 
dance, for he seemed a bit uncertain In Els 
steps. ■ Miss McNeil did most of the dancing, 
and offered a Frisco imitation, though it was 
not announced as one. But it was pretty 
good, at that. She also did an oriental bit 
and a jazz number. . 

Doughboy Sam Ward followed the news reel 
with a Hebrew monologue about his experi- 
ences in the army. This kind of stuff has 
been done to death of late, and it Is doubtful 
as to whether this vehicle will last Ward 
very .much longer. The gags have much room 
for improvement in the way of new material 
and his delivery can also be Improved. 

Tbe Magic Glasses, a sketch with three 
men and . one girl, pleased. It tells of two 
men, one rich and one poor, who are in love 
with the same girl. She goes to an old man 
who has fitted all styles of glasses, and he 
lets her wear some "magic glasses." Through 
them she sees what would happen if she mar- 
ried the poop man, or the rich man. Natur- 
ally, being a vaudeville sketch, she is happy 
with the poor one and unhappy with the rich, 
with the result tbat tbe poor man wins. The 
plot Is old, but Is handled well by the cast 
and will please on tbe small time. 

Phil Baker, assisted by Jo-Jo in a box, 
scored the langh and applause hit of tbe show. 
As Phil announced to the orchestra leader in 
tones that could be heard all over the house, 
he was trying out some new gags. Baker is 
a clever boy and It Is really regretable that 
he is lost to the big time for lack of ma- 
terial. He should get It, for, If any one la 
capable. It Is he. He plays tbe accordeon 
well and delivers his material excellently. 
Jo-Jo gave a good account of himself with 
bis comedy. 

Selma Braotz and - Company closed the 
show with a clever juggling offering. 

G. J. H. 

METROPOLITAN 

(Last Half) 

The Morton Brothers opened the show 
wltb a novel offering. The boys did some 
playing on the harmonica and then fashioned 
some creations out of paper. They are ex- 
perts In their line and, .while the patter they 
used did not get them very many laughs, 
they made a good opening ace and received a 
generous round of applause. 

Foley and' La Tour, a man and woman, 
offered a song act tbat was good In spots, but 
not quite - so good In others. The woman 
. member of the team has a pleasing voice, 
bnt the man, a light comedian, does not sing 
as well. They opened with a medley of popu- 
lar tunes, after which came a song by the 
man, alone. There was also a ballad by the 
woman in which the man joined. Some more 
singing by both of them was followed by a 
Chinese number, with which they closed. 

Fashions De Vogue turned out to be an .act 
that Interested the women much more than 
the men. Two girls are naed as models by 
a man who, using only pieces of cloth and 
pins, fashions various growns upon tbem. 
The gowns produced were attractive. One 
of the girls does some singing, In addition to 
acting as a -model, and tbe other plays the 
piano during one part of the act 

Barnes and Freeman, two men, one of them 
a Hebrew comedian, presented a talk and song 
act thst included several clever bits. Most of 
the laughs, however, were supplied by the 
comedian's antics and bits of slapstick. The 
audience received all that the two delivered 
with apparent glee and they rang up a good- 
sized hit .There is room for improvement 
in a number of places In the act bnt it will 
have little trouble scoring on the small time 
in its present shape. 

Minnie Bnrke and her Jasz Band closed. 
The boys are billed, outside, as tbe Four 
Kings of Jaxxcopatlon, whatever that ia. 
Tbe boys played several Jazzy tunes and the 
principal sang and danced. Her voice la not 
very good, but her stepping met with ap- 
proval and. in the closing position, the turn 
scored a hit - . I. S. 



PROCTOR'S 12STH STREET 

(L«t Half) 

In accordance with last year's policy. 
Bob O'Donnell. with the capable assistance 
of Joe- O'Neill, started the Fall season by 

- offering a double bill of vaudeville acts on 
Friday and will do so every Friday during 
the Fail and Winter seasons. ' 

Sailor Lannlng opened the show with a 
few imitations of birds and other bit*. See 
New Acta. 

Maural Bernardo, assisted by a lady at 
the piano, offered some singing and patter. 
See New Acts. 

Jeff- Davis, the "hobo-king." offered a 
monologue in "slanguage" that for the 
most part consisted of a lecture on "hobo- 
Ism." New Acts. 

Conne and Albert was the first act of the 
regular, bill. The team, man and woman. 
Work as' school kids, the man in knicker- 
bockers" arid the woman in rompers. The 
lady member of the team la an excellent 
"kid,'' and. as a comedienne, can be rated 
among the best. 

. Maud -Allen offered a song cycle of an 
excellent repertoire and In a very good 
voice, that should soon land her on the 
big time. ' See New Acts. 

Stanley and Mazie Hughes, assisted by a 
pianist -who Is not billed, earned applause 
with their dance offering. The two are 
excellent dancers and have a good routine 
of numbers worked out. Each- dance the 
team goes through tells a story which -was 
not lost on the audience. 

Monti and Carti, two neat young men In 
tuxedos, offered a musical program, using 
the clarinet and accordeon. They opened 
with an Hungarian aria, which they ren- 
dered capably. A clarinet solo, consisting 
of- popular numbers, followed, and an 
operatic number on tbe accordeon, which 
.came after, took a big hand. The duo 
closed -with a medley of jazz and popular 
bits and scored a hit. 

The Misses Parker, assisted by a pianist, 
offered a cycle of classical songs, but, after 
the audience had heard Miss Allen, this 
act suffered by comparison. Tbe two 
women have fairly good voices, but do 
more posing than vocal work. Gestures 
are proper in singing certain numbers, but 
the Misses Parker, especially the taller of 
the two, overdo them. They will . find It 
very much to their advantage to cut out 
most of the posing in their numbers and 
to devote more of their efforts to singing. 
The pianist Is also guilty of posing, and 
the idea of lighting a cigarette and then 
putting it down. Just before rendering a 
solo, certainly does not aid the solo or his 
work in the least He plays the piano 
well. 

The Bluebird Trio, all men. one working 
as a "wop" comedian, followed with more 
singing. They offered a number of old 

Subllshed songs which they rendered well, 
lowever, their routine Is much too long 
and begins to tire on the audience before 
they are through. 

- Al Shnynn eloped the show and. In that 
position, took three encores and could have 
taken more. He ia using a new "plant" 
In the orchestra, who does his work well. 
A number of new gags have been put Into 
the routine- and proved real laugh-getters. 

G. J. H. 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

The Bramlnos have a musical novelty offer- 
ing that ia worthy of a much better spot 
than opening position on a small time bill, 
to mention the queer musical apparatus and 
the method in which they were worked, would 
take up too mnch space, but the act pleases 
from start to finish and leaves the audience 
wanting more. 

.,. 1 Y n .5?. I . er an<1 Potter have a fair little skit 
that will get over mainly because of the per- 
sonality at the couple handling it and the 
dancing ability of the young man. rather than 
because of the material. The patter, espec- 
ially towards the latter half of the act, needs 
no comment concerning Its age. The male 
member of the team does some good eccen- 
tric dancing. 

Jules and Annette Garrison have gathered 
a lot of so-called burlesque that might go on 
the small time, and even there will probably 
find difficulty In getting over. The lady has 
a good voice, and would do well to render 
one or two more songs. 

The . Fonr Harmony Kings took three en- 
cores and, had they so desired, could bave 
easily- taken as many more. The quartette, 
all the members of which are colored, possess 
the negro's natural instinct -for music, and 
have made aome very good selections for their 
repertory. 

Ed Norworth and Company has shown con- 
siderable Improvement since last reviewed. 
A new young man has been added to the 
act The new ' addition is a crackerjack 
pianist, and the audience could not get 
enough of him. The act Is now billed as 
Norworth and Wells, tbe latter being the 
young lady's name. - 

Yvonne and Company, the "company" con- 
sisting of a*' violinist in the pit and Con- 
stant! ne Kobeloff, who is not billed, closed the 
show with a good dance offering. It will be 
reviewed under New Acts. G. J. H. 



September 3, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 





BILLIE SHAW AND CO. 

Theatre — Nev> Brighton. 
Style — Dancing. 
Time — Eighteen minuter. 
Setting — Fuil at age (special). 

Seabury and Shaw are presenting Miss 
Shaw's sister, BiUie, in a dance offering 
that is worthy of a headline position. 
Miss Shaw' is supported by Dave White 
and assisted by George liberie, who 
plays the saxophone, Lew Winihrop and 
-John Good. 

The act opens with some patter be- 
tween White and another young man in 
the act, about a girl whom the two are 
to meet. White is a good looking young 
man, who appears to be about eighteen 
years of age and resembles George White 
not only in looks, but in his style of 
dancing. When Miss Shaw appears, a 
waits number is done by the three. 
Miss Shaw resembles her sister very 
much, being a pretty little girl with 
golden curls. A song by White and a 
dance follow. The number which fol- 
lows is done by Miss Shaw and White, 
both as toys, Miss Show as a doll and 
White as a jumping-jack. White com- 
pletes the dance alone. 

The next number is a bedroom scene 
in which Miss Shaw is disclosed on a 
raised stage in the rear, looking very 
charming in her boudoir attire. She is 
serenaded- by the saxophonist and does 
a jazz dance- with bare limbs. An ec- 
centric dance by White, in which Miss 
Shaw joins, after coming from a cham- 
pagne glass, -is very well done. White 
completes it with a "souse" cane dance 
that will soon have the other dancers 
trying to imitate him, for it's a dandy. 
A number by Miss Shaw and White) with 
the saxophone accompanying, completes 
the offering. 

The dancing of both Miss Shaw and 
White is excellent. Miss Shaw is as 
graceful as they come and looks very 
pretty in all her costumes. As to 
White, considering his youth, the boy 
is all that one requires from a big time 
male dancer. He is graceful and very 
light and possesses one quality that a 
good many of our male dancers do not: 
his dancing is masculine throughout. 
He has not one movement that can be 
termed effeminate. 

The offering is bound to please on any 
1»11- G. J. H. 



WALTERS AND COOPER 

Theatw — Proctor's 23rd St. 
Style — Singing. 
Time — Twelve Minute*. 
Setting— In One. 

Walters and Cooper, two men, work 
in blackface. The one at the piano uses 
brown . coloring matter in making up, 
while the other uses the more usual, 
darker tint. They have a singing act 
that will probably be able to play all of 
the small time herabouts with success. 

The song routine of the act includes 
several selections now popular and their 
rendition of them is good enough to 
warrant their getting work. The offer- 
ing does need some variety though. 
There is a very short piano solo, but 
that helps little. A few bits of patter 
tbat are really clever would be of 
aasistanee. - -Tndicentally, there, is simi- 
larity between some of their songs which 
makes the act drag a bit at times. The 
boys have some ability and, in time, will 
probably bolster up their act. 

With one of the boys at the piano and 
the other by his side, they open with a 
' jazzy melody and follow with a comedy 
song. The fellow at the piano then 
delivers a few lines in rhyme in which 
be. announces that he will render some 
jazz music and follows with a short solo. 
A "Dixie" song follows and a "Blues" 
number, with a medley of popular tames, 
Closes. . I. s. 



| NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



McLALLEN AND CARSON 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 
Style — Slitting and Comedy. 
Tim* — Twenty minute*. 
Setting — F ull stage. 

As a rule, skating acts that attempt 
anything in the line of good comedy pat- 
ter are. good merely as skating acts. 
But here is a couple who can easily 
dispense with their skating and be euro 
of a good spot on many bills with 
their patter and comedy, most of which 
is bandied by the male member of the 
team, a boyish looking young man who . 
knows the value of delivery. . 

The act runs pretty long for one of 
its kind but that is mainly due to the 
laughs which it garners. There are one 
or two gags which can be called old tn 
the offering, but the manner in which 
° they are handled makes, them good for 
laughs even If they have been heard 
before. The skating in the act, has but 
a few spots that are out of the ordinary 
and that is a dance by the young man 
with skates on a table, and the finish. 

The majority of the gags are new 
ones and, at this house, kept the au- 
dience laughing from the moment the 
act .went on to the last line. The girl 
is pretty and the young man has per- 
sonality. G. J. H. 



NED NORWORTH TRIO 

Theatre— Proctor's 1251* St. 

Style — Comedy. \ 

Tune — Ft hit teen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

Nbrworth, assisted by a young man 
who does hardly anything worth men- 
tioning and a young lady, who does 
a little bit more than that, has gathered 
together a lot of "hokum" and prob- 
ably expects to be a riot with It. We 
fear, though that he may yet come 
across some audience, the patience of 
which has been sorely tried with this) 
type of "near-comedy," and a riot will 
start. But it will not be the kind he 
would like. . . 

There are one or two spots in the act 
that are worth a legitimate laugh, but 
one laugh or so does not. make an act. 
The piano end of the act can also be 
worked up to much better advantage, 
for Norworth displayed some ability on 
the ivories. The entire fault with the 
act can be summed in the fact that it 
isn't. G. J. H. 

LESTER AND VINCENT 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Juggling. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting— I n three. 

Man and woman team in a small time 
juggling offering. The stunts they offer 
however are ordinary. Most of them 
depend upon various trick apparatuses 
in the act and are balancing stunts 
mainly. One or two are fair for comedy 
purposes, but the act, aa a whole, is 
small time. G. J. H. 



HENRY GREY 

Theatre— Proctor's 125ifr fir*. 
Style — Singing and Talking. 
Time — Fourteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

Henry Grey has a fairly good single 
for the three-a-day but that is as far 
as he will ever advance with his pres- 
ent material. His voice pleases and he 
delivers a song fairly well. His patter, 
while there is milch room for improve- 
ment in the line of gags, raised quite 
a number of laughs at this house. The 
act should get bookings on the small 
- time. G. J. Hi 



BETH STONE-ARMOND & CO. 

Theatre— Eighty-first Street. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Ten minute*. 

Setting— Full stage (special). 

Beth Stone-Armond and Company 
present a number of original dances, 
using a full stage draped on the back 
and aides with an artistic blue curtain. 
There are three persona in the act : the 
dancers (man and girl) and a male 
piano player. 

The opening dance is the weakest 
portion of the act, being below the 
standard of dances one usually sees in 
this sort of an act The offering redeems 
itself in short order, however, by the 
clever stepping of the man in the dance 
that follows. A grotesque toe dance by 
the girl stays far and away from the 
usual rut of this style of dance and 
should score big on any bill. This is 
followed by an impression of an English- 
man with jazs fever which is good 
enough to pass muster and the dance 
that follows is replete with all kinds of 
steps, bringing the act to a snappy close. 

h. j. a. 



WELLS AND CREST 

Theatre — hoeuf* Qreeley Sq. 
Style— Singing and talking. 
Time— Ttrelvc minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Wells and Crest, two men, have an 
offering that fecks really clever material, 
and generally does not show very much 
speed. One of them plays a "wop" role 
and the other a straight. The former 
does fair work, bnt the straight does not 
feed the comedian well. 

The singing la fairly good, but the turn 
lacks anything resembling novelty and is 
only one of a number of similar acta 
now appearing on the small time. 

Starting with some dialogue, much of 
it centering about married life, the 
"wop" comedian went into a popular 
tune. - Some more talk followed, after 
which the two rendered a ballad together. 
It went over fairly well. ' They then did 
some more singing, finishing with a par- 
ody on a classical aria. I. S. 



; PAULA 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th St. 

Style— Acrobatic. . > 

Time — Ten Minutes. 

Setting— Full Stage. 

Paula opens her turn in one with a 
dance that can be only termed fair and' 
could easily be omitted from the routine. 
The remainder of the offering is on 
full stage and on a trapeze, and she goes 
through a number of feats doing a bit 
of contortion here and there. Her stunts 
are well done, although they have nothing 
that could be termed sensational about 
them. 

She doses with an iron-jaw feat in 
which she whirls in mid-air, hanging by 
her teeth from the trapeze. She should 
get bookings as an opening act along 
the small time route. G. J. H. 



TWO BUCKS 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Bouse. 

Style — Casting. 

Time— Ten minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

Two men in comedy make-up are the 
Two Bucks, a name which leaves one 
guessing as to whether it is their moni- 
ker or salary. 

They have a very short routine of 
casting feats, which give their usual 
thrills. They also do a bit in the 
comedy line which is ordinary. They 
would do well to work up a few more 

stunts for their act. G. 3. H. 



SIDNEY FAULK 

Theatre— Harlem Opera House. 
Sty to — Singing. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting— fa one (special). 

Sidney Faulk formerly did a single in 
vaudeville under the name of Sidney 
Forbes.. In that, Faulk, which la his 
right name, offered a Kipling recital 
in which he sang and recited a number 
of the poet's best selections. He has 
named his new offering, "The Thief," 
and uses a special drop showing a back- 
stage interior. 

After flashing a flashlight through the 
curtain, he enters from a door in his 
drop and offers a song telling the au- 
dience that he is a thief and, contrary 
to the rule of thieves, announces that 
he will steal their laughs, applause and 
heartf. The last seems to be putting it 
a bit strong. 

He also announces that he won't steal 
bits from other acta and, at the same 
time, does a few imitations. A medley 
of opera and jazz 'is put in the tune of 
the announcement. 

A "wop" number, a published number, 
one comedy bit, "Cuckoo," in which he 
does a little of burlesque, and a closing 
bit about the thief completes the offer- 
ing. 

Faulk has a fairly good single In his 
present act, which can be improved upon 
in spots. But the writer's candid 
opinion is tbat this single is not to be 
compared with the Kipling recital which 
he formerly used. The other was «, 
. clsssic. This offering does not give him 
aa good an opportunity to display his 
voice as he did in the other. But it 
will do for the three-a-day and the bet- 
ter class homes. Q. j. jj. 



PARPETTE "•-*«■ 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Bt. 
Style— Aero batic 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— Futt stage. 

Parpette has an act which may be 
classed as a genuine acrobatic novelty. 
He Impersonates a woman on a wire and 
then does some work on a' pair of flying 
rings. He then does a few cleverly exe- 
cuted feats ahd when, at the finish, he 
reveals the fjact that he is a man, it 
comes in the nature of a surprise. Acts 
in which men impersonate women danc- 
ers and singers are not very rare, but 
the impersonation of a woman acrobat 
is something' new. 

The offering is a good one and will 
make a most satisfactory opening on 
the -better small time if not on some 
of the big time. j. g. 



SIMPSON AND MOORE 

Theatre— Proctor's 58f* St. 
Style — Talking and Singing. 
Time — Fourteen Minutes. 

Setting— In tiro. 

Simpson and Moore, man and woman, 
have a song and talk act that should 
enable them, to play all of the better 
small time. ' The turn includes some 
cross-fire dialogue which contains several 
clever bits and a few. good vocal selec- 
tions. The performers do welt with the 
material and the act should find work 
without much trouble. At this house 
they scored la good-sised hit and should 
be able to do so at other houses on the 
three-a-day, and perhaps, at some of the 
two-a-day. 

They started with some cross-fire 
patter which included several good gags 
and the man followed with a "Blues" 
song, announced as an impression of a 
Southern darkey. The girl followed with 
a ballad, after which came more dia- 
logue, with the man getting the better 
of the conversation. They conclude with 
a current song. I, g, 



1Z 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 



FOREIGN NEWS 




STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 



NEW AGENTS MUST ADVERTISE GREAT DEMAND FOR THEATRES 
BEFORE OPENING FOR BUSINESS SUITABLE FOR STOCK PLAYS 

London Council Rules They Must Put Ad in Newspapers for Two Managers Can't Secure Enough Houses to Meet Demands — 
Weeks Before License Will Be Granted — Many Cities Have Doubled in Stock Patronage Since. 

Gives Chance for Protest. End of War — Season Gives Great Promise 



London, Fug,, Aug. 31. — A ruling 
adopted by the Lo. idofc County Council, in 
session last week, has -made it imperative 
for people conten plating going into the 
agency business, w th the intention of em- 
ploying theatrical < r cinema artists, to ad- 
vertise their purpo e fit at least two of the 
leading daily news] •pera. 

This ruling is t le outcome of repeated 
frauds by fake ag nicies which have been 
springing up and lisappearing as quickly, 
without regular licenser and with no respon- 
sible backing, lie result has been that 
many performers vho trusted these agen- 
cies nave been flee ed. By this new method, 
performers are g Ten a chance to state 
their objections, ij they have any, against 
the would-be agen - 

The prescribed form of advertisement 
is as follows: "Employment Agency 
Licence. — I, (a) intend to 

apply to the London: County Council for 



a licence to carry on an Employment 
Agency for (b) at No. 

such agency to be known as (c) ■ 
All objections (and the grounds therefor) 
must be submitted in writing to the Clerk 
of the Council, County Hall, Spring 
Gardens, S.W.I, within 14 days from the 
date of publication of this advertisement. 
Note : (a) Insert real" name'; (b) - insert 
theatrical and variety artistes' or 'cinema 
artistes'; (e) insert title of agency."- *. 

Another ruling passed by the County 
Council provides that an agent going into 
business after the first of the year. 1906, 
be required to pay a license fee, of $10.50 
— and if he run that agency for five years, 
he shall only have to pay $7.60 for a license 
fee. Charges for yearly renewals shall be 
in all cases $525. After the expiration of 
the five-year term, the agent snail apply 
for a new license. 



RITA GOULD DANCES FOR KING 

Loitdon, Aug. 29. — Rita Gould, who 
came overseas to entertain the American 
Expeditionary Forces last Fall, received 
a royal command in London, last week, 
to appear and five a performance before 
the Kin g and Queen of England. 

The command was the result of Miss 
Gould's having entertained the Prince of 
Wales at Cohleni hut Christmas. Miss 
Gould, at that time, appeared at an enter- 
tainment given in honor of the Prince by 
Lieut. Gen. Liggett and, after the per- 
formance, wai congratulated by His Royal 
Highness who, at the, same time, requested 
her to dance with him. that evening at the 
ball given in his honor. At the time, the 
Prince gave Miss Gould an autographed 
photo of Mm«»W and told her that when 
she came to England he would be pleased 
to have her appear and entertain his 
parents. 



SURREY TO BE CIRCUS AGAIN 

London, Eng., Aug. -3L — That every- 
thing returns to whence it came, has been 
again proven by the fact that the Surrey 
Theatre is to become a circus again,' this 
season. The theatre, one of the oldest in 
England, was built in 1782, by Charles 
Dibdin, and opened as the Royal Circus. 
After the house had been running for a 
while the Magistrates ordered it closed, be- 
cause it violated the license under which 
it operated. It burned down in 1803 and 
was rebuilt the following year, being re- 
christened "The Surrey.*' 

Since then it has boused Shakespearean 
drama, variety, tragedy and almost every 
kind of performance imaginable. And now 
it is returning to its original purpose, the 
circus. 



QUEER CONTRACT CASE COMES UP 

London, Eng., Aug. 30.— An action in 
the Westminster County Court concerning 
the obligations of agents and actors under 
a contract, has aroused interest here, be- 
cause it takes up whether or not an 
agency has a right to guarantee its clients 
work, and then, by means of a previous 
option, cause them to lose it. 

The case is that of Murray and Dawe, 
agents, against will Hay. Hay was signed 
for a tour of the Moss Empires, Ltd. He 
had several free months prior to the dates 
and so his agents booked him with Fred 
Karoo for "The Bites," for eight weeks, 
giving Karno an option on his services. 
He played with Karno for the full run 
and an additional five weeks, under one 
option, and several weeks under a second. 

Meantime, Hayes had notified the agents 
that his agreement, to work for Karno 
would not be valid, titi!»«» they agreed to 
absolve him from all liability to injunctions 
by the Moss Empires, due to non-fulfilment 
of dates, and that they were to postpone 
these dates for him till the contract with 
Karno had been filled. The Moss Syndi- 
cate refused to postpone the dates, but 
Karno induced them to do .so on the pay- 
ment of $165. 

Hay told the agency to pay Karno 
$87.50, half of the amount, as they were 
equally responsible for the situation. Tbey 
came back with a suit for commission 
amounting to $227.50. The case was set- 
tled by mutual agreement between counsel 
for both sides and the presiding justice. 



DROOCW ATER GETS DEGREE 
London, Eng., Aug. 28. — John Drink- 
water, author of "Abraham Lincoln," who 
is a critic and poet, besides being man- 
ager of the Birmingham Repertory Thea- 
tre, has been given: an honorary degree 
of Master of Arts by the University of 
Birmingham. 

"Abraham Lincoln" will be produced in 
America by Win. Harris. 



VOLTERRA IS ACTIVE 
Paris, France, Aug. 28. — Leon Volterra 
has a program of activities on hand that 
will keep him busy most of the coming 
season. First be will produce a play called 
"Talma," which will be a biographical 
spectacle shewing the life of the great 
French actor. M. Jube will play the role 
of Talma. 

Later in the- season he will present 
Andre Brule, in "Arsene Lupin," and 
"L'Epervier," which he wiU revive. 



QUEENIE ROSS MARRIED 

London, Eng., Aug. SL — Queenie Ross, 
a variety perf ormer, : has' been married to 
Albert Berg, a film, actor, recently. The 
bride is a daughter of Nellie Sheldon. The 
bridegroom is a metaber of -the Egyptian 
Expeditionary Forces. 



HIT IT RIGHT IN ENGLAND 

LONDON, Eng., Aug. 31. — The Nathano 
Brothers who opened here two weeks ago 
have been booked for- the remainder of the 
1919-20 season. They created such a hit 
that the management of the theatres they 
appeared in have rebooked them. 



CONNIE EDDIS ARRIVES 

London, Eng., Aug. 31. — ■ Connie Eddis, 
who is to appear with Cyril Mande in 
"Lord Richard in the Pantry" next month, 
has arrived from America. 



There is an unusual demand for suit- 
able locations for stock companies now 
that the season- is under way. Many 
cities thai have, heretofore, supported 
only the one company, are now demand- 
ing two, and, in some cases, three. Prool 
• of this fact is "that there are two com- 
panies running in Lynn, Mass., both doing 
excellent- business. Two companies are 
also running to capacity business in Law- 
rence, Mass.' 

•In New York; in the Bronx, there axe 
two companies running and doing well and 
there are possibilities of three or four 



appearing , there. The reason for this is 
the inability . of road shows to go out, 
9 wing to the tieup of the. producing or- 
ganizations, and the removal of the re- 
straint imposed by tiie war. 

There are many managers who are try- 
ing to get theatres of repute and drawing 
ability. Evidently, the supply of attain- 
able and suitable houses has been ex- 
hausted,, or else this owners, anticipating 
the great demand, have held on to them, 
hoping that when the proper time arrived, 
they would secure' higher' rentals for 
them. .' " . - . •.. •' 



LAWRENCE COMPANY OPENS 

La whence, Mass., Aug. 28.— The Colon- 
ial Theatre opens Labor Day with stock, 
presenting "The Little Teacher," to be fol- 
lowed by "Not With My Money." The 
house is under the Toomey and Denmarra 
management, with Thomas Whyte house 
manager and Max Melincoff as treasurer. 
The company is composed of Frank Du- 
Frane and Elsie Riser, as leads, supported 
by Walter S. Weeks, Lillian Stuart, Will- 
iam Phelps, Annie Bradley, Herbert Dob- 
bins, Nellie Peck Saunders and Charles 
Danforth. The productions win be under 
the direction of Carrol Daly and Assistant 
Director Byron Hawkins. 

NEWARK HAS NEW COMPANY 

Newark, N. J., Aug. 29. — A new stock 
company, the Orpheum Players, opens 
August 30, here. George Stroud and 
Charles D. Pitt are managing the com- 
pany, which also includes Alfred Cross, 
leading man; Genevieve Cliff, leading 
woman; Ainsworth Arnold, second man; 
Leonard Sumner, Burt Clarke, Dan Davis, 
Stewart Beebe, stage manager, and Edwin 
Forbes, business manager; Doris Under- 
wood and aJUta Athy. The opening show 
was "Fair and Warmer." "A Stitch in 
Time," "The Little Teacher" and "The 
Naughty Wife" will follow. 



UNION HILL CO. REOPENS 

Union Hnx, N. J., Aug. 31. — The Keith 
Stock Company, at the Hudson Theatre, 
this dty, will re-open ifs season here 
tomorrow with "Come Out of the Kitchen." 
Ernestine Morley and Dudley Ayres will 
play the leads. Th e company is under 
the direction of William Wood. E. H. 
Curtis will be stage director. 



LEAVE GARRICK PLAYERS 

Washington, D. CL, Aug. 23. — Lynne 
Overman and Eileen Wilson have left the 
cast of the Carries: Stock company to re- 
hearse with Broadway productions. George 
P. Marshall, who has been connected with 
L. M. Bell in the management of the com- 
pany, has withdrawn. - 



PEYTON REOPENS LABOR DAY 

Trenton, N. J., Aug. SL — The Joe Pey- 
ton Players, who have been resting "for a 
week or so, are to re-open their season on 
Labor Day. The name of the attraction 
has not been given. Joseph Sweeney 
joined the company during the lay-off 
period. 

OLIVER ENTERS CHICAGO 

Chicago, BL, Aug. 31. — Otis Oliver 
is to open his season at the Warrington 
Theatre, Oak Park, on September 1st. 
The name of the play has not been given. 



HIS PRESENT WAS A COFFIN 

Atlantic City, Aug. 29. — Lillian Rus- 
sell was not so very much surprised yes- 
terday when, while standing in the lobby 
of her hotel, a gray-haired man, who ex- 
plained that he was D. H. Schuyler, of 
Philadelphia, announced that he had ad- 
mired her for years and had a handsome 
present for her. She was surprised, how- 
ever, when closer investigation revealed 
the fact that the present consisted of a 
gold-trimmed coffin, worth, $27,000. It de- 
velops that Schuyler is an undertaker. 



WEISS OWED $3,000 
When Clarence Weisa died on October 
11, 1918, he left assets "amounting to 
$4^88 and liabilities of $7,586. This- fact 
was revealed in the Surrogate's court last 
week .when application was made giving 
that the estate be exempted from inheri- 
tance, taxation. Weiss was thirty-nine 
years of age when he died and had been 
the manager of the American Theatrical 
Exchange at 1476 Broadway for about 
three months previous to his death. 

BEDFORD ROSTER FILLED 

New Bedford, Mass, Aug. 3L — The 
following is a roster of players who com- 
pose the New Bedford Players, appearing 
at the New Bedford .Theatre,, this city. 
Enid May Jackson, leading woman, Hooper 
Atchley, Rita Davis, Malcolm Arthur, Ed- 
win Dudley, John Gordon, George Mc- 
Entee, Herbert DeGuerre, Jeanette Cass 
and Caryl Goodwin. . . . , 



LEWIS CHANGES TOWNS. . 

Dallas, Tex., Aug. 3L— Gene Lewis, 
who, with his stock company, has been 
appearing at the Cycle Park Theatre here, 
is to close his season the coming week 
and move his company to Beaumont, Tex., 
where be will open at the Kyle Theatre 
September. 14th. 



CLEVELAND CO. TO CONTINUE 

Cleveland, Ohio, Aug. 30. — The season 
of the Colonial Players, at the Colonial 
Theatre, this city, has been prolonged in- 
definitely, due to- the. uncertainty of road 
shows coming out this season-. 



TAKES YONKERS HOUSE 

Carroll and Forbes have taken over the 
Warburton Theatre, in Yonkero, New 
York, and will run it as a stock house. 
They opened on September 1st, with 
"Daddy Long Legs." 

OPEN IN LANSING, MICH. 

Lansing, Mich, Aug. 3L — The FJdridge 
Players, under the direction of H. E. 
Eldridge, 'Open their season of stock here 
tonight with "Brewsters Millions" as the 
opening attraction. 



September 3, 1919 



TREbNEW YO RVL GL I PP E R 



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Founded In USJ by IM 
Published far- the 
CLIPPER CORPORATION 



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UFT THE WAR TAX 

-Although the tramp of ma r ch in g feet 
and the sound of martial music has been 
growing fainter and fainter until now 
almost stilled,' and although war is now 
a thing of the past and peace has settled 
once again on earth, the war tax on 
theatre tickets still remains and there 
has been little or no legislative effort to 
abolish it. " .: ■ ,\ 

Even in war time, it was debatable 
whether legislation that levied this sort 
of a tax- upon the amusement world was 
justified. Surely, the theatre was doing 
its. bit in the war to. lighten, the burden 
of sorrow and yet those who were paying 
great . sacrifices both financi a ll y and spir- 
itually,, were called upon to pay a tax 
when they wished to enter, the . Land of 
Make- Believe for. a few momenta. to mo- 
mentarily blot out the darker hoars; 

It was 'the theatre, with both -its stage 
and screen,, that helped keep our; public 
morale on such a high plane.. . It was' the 
theatre that helped entertain our .boys 
both Over. There and in the camps.; at 
home. It was always the theatre that .was 
called upon to foster "Loan" drives and. 
to raise money, and spirit for the various 
kinds. of war-work. . 

All this ' was done by the theatre, will- 
ingly and "cheerfully and theatredom was . 
proud of the big part it played in serving 
Uncle 'Sam.' • ^ . • 

But now that all is over, must, the . 
theatre go an bearing a' burden? Besides 
the- time and profits that it so graciously 
gave, to its country in- an emergency 
must the. theatre now go on to contribute 
to the support of . a' peaxusftti" nation with 
a war-time tax? Js-if that Uncle Sam is 
taking advantage of theatrical - good 
naturef"' 'Has not the emergency- passed? 

The war. tax on the admission .price to 
amusements .- should be "lifted. With the 
present _high prices -for practically all 
commodities and with the unprecedented '. 
economic and social conditons that have . 
followed in the wake of war, 'the mind 
of the people still needs entertainment 
and amusement to lighten the problems of 
these 'trying days and. the. people should 
be allowed to seek, such pleasure and 
theatres -to give it without , the- imposing 
of an antiquated and now unjustified war 



ACTORS AS PRODUCERS 

r:*'T?ZC~ i * r *i''J h ' N Y;:1V<,r!dY.r. --■-'. 
- General public interest will be taken in _ 
the experiment of the striking actors of * 
producing their-* own plays. Having dis-~ .. 
pensed with managers, they have now an ' 
exceptional opportunity to show to what 
extent, if at aU, the success of a- drama 
depends, on box^ffice control. With most 
of the theatres r jclosed, '^here is plenty of 
professional talent available for the enter- 
prise, and given that the National Co- 
operative Theatre is directed in an intelli- 
gent spirit' of 'co-operation its chances of: 
success ought to be good. It will produce 
legitimate plays, musical comedies and 
vaudeville,' and .there -is an excellent 
augury in the announcement that the road 
companies of the organization will "play 
in halls and .'tents when necessary." 

That smacks agreeably of barn-storm- 
ing ideals, when the play was the thing 
and "the throne of Denmark was a chair." 
Is the public ready to dispense with the 
gewgaws of the drama - for the real art 
of acting? Bernhardt found it so, and 
doubtless there will be enough theatres 
available to obviate the serious necessity, 
of the test. After all, it is the play and 
the player that catch the popular fancy; 
managers "are but names. They are use- 
ful enough when the ghost walks and 
in underwriting the performance. It is 
on that qualification that the outcome of 
the venture most depends. 

But certainly the opportunity is there 
as never before for the profession to break 
its leading-strings and show "Ihat it can 
be self-sustaining on a purely artistic 
basis. It has the sympathy of the public, 
and. the one thing for it to worry over 
is the business ability. ; .* 

COHAN PROTESTS TOO MUCH 

(From the N. T. Times.) . 
Mere drama of the footlights pales in 
comparison with the "struggle of opposing 
wills" put up by the Fidelity actors against 
the Equity actors. When Mr. George M. 
Cohan, "tense, and white," read to his 
fellows in .Fidelity the terms of their 
newly framed contract, he shouted,. "I 

; don't- want to pin any bouquets on my- 
self, but dont let any one tell you that 
the Actors' Equity is responsible for this. 
I am responsible for this!" 
'Like another person of the drama, Mr. 
Cohan protests too much. His Fidelity 
contract, which the managers have now 

. approved, guarantees "time for overtime" — 
the managers' recent refusal of which was 
the direct cause of the. Equity strike. 
With regard to the second great bone ot 
contention, pay for rehearsals, the Fi- 
delity contract is in all respects more lib- 
eral' than the Equity demands, and in 
several other points it makes definite ad- 
vances in liberality. .Both Mr. Cohan and 
her Majesty of Denmark might well have 
practiced the self-analysis of a certain 
little girl who was told that it -was the 
devil in her who caused her to mimic her 
friends and stick out her tongue at them. 
She admitted that the faces she made 
may have been inspired; but she insisted 
that putting out her tongue was her own 
idea. The Fidelity contract is the pro- 
posed Equity 'contract with an added 
gesture. Except for the loyal fight whicn 
the Equity Association has made, such a 
contract would not now be exalted before 
the world, but would be as remote as the 
Greek kalends. 

.' In one respect, the conduct of the 
Equity Association may be open to ques- 
tion — the fact that it called out actors 
playing under its own contracts without 
'the two weeks' notice. Prominent lawyers, 
have declared .that legally the action can 
be. defended; but the fact that they per- 
sistently reserve the ground of their de- 
fense-indicates that at best it is technical 
and' can be made good only by litigation. 
The point', is important because it is the 
sole remaining" ground . on. which the Man- 
agers' Association has any excuse for re- 
fusing to deal with the strikers as an 
association. The new- Fidelity contract, 
in spite of Mr. Cohan's protests, is an 
obviouj admission- -that there has ' been 
wrpng on one side.. If the striken would 
also- abandon a position which is false, or 
at best technical, nothing would be left 
but aP-dance- -.with - all hands round and 
"curtain" on a happy ending. • '•' 



TWENTY-FIVE. YEARS AGO 

Mollie Thompson sailed .for Europe. \~ 

Wm. J. Scanlon was adjudged insane. 

Eleanor Mayo was with the "Princess 
Bonnie Co." 

Walker Whiteside was under the direc- 
tion of W.J. Winterburn. 

"The Little Lost Child" was published 
h? Jos. W. Stern , and Company at 9M 
East ?Hth street, New Yo^ci . :' . * 

The'Rcilly and Wood? 'Show included 
The Savans, Perry and Ten Brooke; Lily 
Laurel and Maude'. Harvey, Lot tia Lons- 
dale, Her, Burke and Randall, -Pat Reilly, 
John West, Eva Armstrong and Joe Allen. 

Weber and Folds' Own Company in- 
cluded Maggie Cline, Le Clair and Leslie, 
James J. Hoey, Annie Hart, Nelson, and 
Levanion, Castellat and Hall, and. John 
E. Drew. William P. Fay was business 
manager. , 




S. J.— Fritxi Seheff has appeared in 
opera. 

D. V.— Ysaye is still alive. He is ot 
j.4Belgttgr nationality. ' 
7 { ■ — ^ • ; '■._ " 

C. B. V.-Kfonault Henry Chesterfield. 
' He can tell you. 

W. EL N.— The Lights Club has a club 
house at Freeport, Long Island. -jg j 

' jiS. X M— Mary Fuller waa one of. the 
flgjst motion picture stars to become 

. " famous. At one time she waa more popu- 
lar than Mary Pickford. She kii re- 

: - tired since- then. ~0 -.".>':. > '.- : :.S-~-~' ■'. 1 



RIALTO RATTLES! 






XHED2 VALUE ._.';■ 

Phil Bush, when asked the value of a 
certain act the other day, replied, "Their 
scenery is worth $100." ? .-, 

STANDING HEADLINES 

"Two more theatres closed by actors 
strike." 

"Injunctions issued against striking 
actors." 



HASPING ON HASPS 

. Bill Casey says that DeValera is a 
harpist. We -asked him why.'. Said Bill, 
said he,- "Because he's been stringing the 
Harps." •'.-•• 

WAS IS— WHAT IT IS 

. George King went to see a certain 
soldier singing act the other night. We 
asked him what he thought of it and he 
replied "Sherman was right." 

DEFINED 

Son— "Father, what is . a leading 

woman?" V ; » 

Father— "Your mother, my dear-"she's 
leading me a h — of a life. 

THEATRICAL PUZZLES 

Why is it that, since the 'actors strike, 
in which the chorus girls were called out, 
the number of army and naval officers 
along Broadway have diminished so 
rapidly. Boy, page Sherlock' Holmes. 

FAMOUS CONVICTIONS' 

Hamby'a — for murder. 

Mountford's — that he could win the 
strike of the White Rats. 

Frank Wilson — that the Equity will win. 

George Cohan's — That everybody in the 
show world is his enemy, except the man- 
agers. 

ARTHUR SOLVES THE PROBLEM 

Arthur Lyons, the Putnam Building 
agent, comes to the front with an ex- 
planation of the actors' strike. "When 
some of those fellows saw that the prices 
of vegetables were going to be forced 
down by the government, they became 
scared and decided to take a rest," says 
he. 



HOW COME— HEH? 

Who's been giving Al Leichter those 
"Pickusups." We can smell them all over 
the building., PM Bush is Bmoking €r*m 
too. Must, he 'a conspiracy to keep- re- 
porters away. - -"* 

HE LIKES HaH 

To prove his popularity, Houdlni telle 
>thie one. - "I was walking along Broad- 
way, absent-mindedly thinking of some 
new escape stunts when I heard some 
one" say, That guy Houdini's good,' and 
before' I knew it, I had walked up to 
the box 'office, bought a ticket, and was 
watching -myself on the screen." 

BUT HE NEVER SHOWED UP 

We understand that a certain legitimate 
producer: -wu considering a moving pic- 
ture venture and a friend suggested to 
him that, Edgar Allan Foe's "The Raven" 
could be 'worked into a good photoplay. 
"Thanks for the suggestion," said the 
producer. "Just send - that fellow Foe 
around and let me talk It over with him." 



PUTNAM BUILDING MYSTERIES 

'Where has Allen Spencer Tenney been 
-for the last week? 

Why has Bob Baker been wearing his 

favorite grin for ten days straight? 
Whom does Phil Bush know- that has a 

pr iva te stock ? . ' 

' Where did Al Leichter buy those long. 

black cigars he smokes? 



NOTES OF THE OFF SEASON 

Abe Feinberg wears a cap. . . ' 
' Joe . Michaels is seen without a cigar 

in his mouth. 
' Arthur Lyons seen with "his hair combed 

differently. '.-•-." 

- Phil Bush discovers a new hair tonic. 
. Joe Michaels buy 3 a box of Pjttsburg 
stogies. - ..' -? .'-. 

•Al Leichter- tips the barber ten cents'. 

- Harvey .Green . bnye -hUr own cigar. 



OUR OWN PARODIES 

Over here — over here. - Hear them cheer— 

- Hear them cheer. Over here. 
Now the war is over, and we're in clover 
No martial music greets the ear. 
But you can hike, cause there's a strike 
And the cars don't run o'er here. 
And what's worse, stars won't rehearse, 
And Broadway's dark till the strike » 
over over here. . 



BLAME NATURE 

When the flowers bloom in poetry, blame 
nature. 

When two lovers love beneath a tree, 
blame nature. 

When you see a maid, whoso- face you 
like, blame nature. 

But when actors and actresses and 
chorus girls strike— Use your own judg- 
ment. 

CIGAR SMOKES 

The poets have dreamed many dreams in 

their days, 
Of bettering the world in various ways, 
And I bad. a dream, I dreamt, my dear 

' friend, - 
That I'd brought the actors strike to an 
end. 
- 1 saw the world its smiles on me beaming, 
' Then awoke ' to find that I'd only, been 
'.-. dreaming. < 



WORDS DEFINED BY NOTED MEN 

Manager oi an act— by Bert La Mont. 
"The guy who disappears with the dough 
the act earned." 

Small time act — by Bob Baker and, it 
booked by him, "Best kind of act in the 
world.". 

Booking Agent— by actor who la laying 
off, ' "Crook, burglar, robber, thief and 
bouefaead." ' .'.'■- 

Bolshevik! and Anarchists — by managera, 
"Actors Equity Association.'' 



September 3, 1919 




YOUR COPY AND 
ORCHESTRATIONS ARE READY 



By the 



writers of 
"Peaches 
down in 
GeorgiaT**^ 



CHICAGO 

Grand Opera Houie Building 

BOSTON ' 

181 Trernont:Stj-cr-t 

PHILADELPHIA 

Globe "Ekejitre-. Building 

NEW ORLEANS - ; 

II? U ;-»<r -,-ty Plicc 
TORONTO. IS; Yong; St. 



LEQ. FEIST, Inc 

711 Seventh :A venue, New Yo-' 



CLEVELAND.: EJIaitofte BId s . 
BUFFALO. 4S5 M.in,; St. 
312 Camerphoine. Building 



DETROIT.,2 13 Wocdw. 

KAN5ASC1TY. Cjveiv. ' 
;LOS ANGELES; S36.5in: 



lAPpLIS* 

;> ric Thrntre- Buildin 

A.TTLE 
iOl Checkering Hall 



September 3, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 





CENSORS ORDER 

CHANGES IN 

SHOWS 



: 



MAKE THEIR FIRST TRIP 



. The Censor Committee of the Ameri- 
can. Burlesque Circuit took a trip around 
to fee a few of the shows playing near 
New York last week. and. have. ordered 
some changes in' shows that must be 
made within the next few weeks. 
! They caught the "Midnight Maidens" 
in -Toronto, and have ordered the follow- 
ing changes : Entire new scenery for the 
first act'; the scenery in the second act 
Has to be repainted or touched up a bit; 
three new sets of costumes and a change 
of two of the- principals. Jules Hurt ig 
has promised to make the changes at 
once-:..' 

! The; "Social Follies," which was seen 
at the Gayety, Brooklyn, according to 
the .Committee, is using all old equipment. 
Max, Spiegel has been ordered to equip 
the show with new scenery and new cos- 
tumes. ~ 

Sim Williams has been notified to add 
to his "Girls From Joy land," a good lively 
soubrette who can put over fast numbers. 
He is to make two other changes in the 
cast, also. ." 

The "Sliding" Billy Watson Show was 
seen at the Academy, Buffalo. They re- 
port that the show is one of the best 
seen. It" is -fast, clean, has plenty of 
comedy, good set of principals, pretty 
costumes and scenery. 
: Chas. Baker's. fTempters" will have to 
change three principals. 

Peck and Jennings, "Jazz Babies," will 
have several changes. 
i The business, according to reports 
from - the .circuit of ' the opening week, 
shows a big increase over the opening 
week of last season. 

I The Censor Committee this season is 
composed of George Peck, William Jen- 
nings, I. H. .Herk, Sam Levey and 
Charles Baker. 



DON CLARK 

Don Clark, whose picture is on the cover 
of this week's issue of the Clipper, has 
just added another success to his long 
list in Peck and Jennings' "Jazz Babies," 
which opened at the Olympic last week. 
He is one of the best producers in bur- 
lesque for he not alone produced the en- 
tire book, which he had also written, but 
staged all the numbers, sis? well. . He is 
also .working in the show, doing' his well 
known light comedy work. 
. : Clark, previous to this season, was with 
I. M. Weingarten's Star and Garter Show 
on the Columbia Circuit for five yean. He 
produced a new show each season for 
Weingarten, as well as staging the num- 
bers. He has written a number of vaude- 
ville acts which are now working. 

CLUB BUYS OUT HOUSE 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 1.— The Haw- 
thorne Club, a political organization of 
this city, has bought out the house for 
September 11 at the Bijou, when it will 
give a theatre party to Frank Metzger, 
manager of the house, and Jimmy Kenny, 
manager of the "Girls, Girls, Girls" com- 
pany, the attraction that week. The 
Bijou is playing American Circuit attrac- 
tions this season. 

Manager Metzger, who opened the house 
several weeks ago, has redecorated it. 

ALI LEFT 95,000 

Joseph AH, musical director of Hurtig 
and Seamon's Theatre, who died on Aug. 
16, left an estate "not exceeding $4,000 in 
personal property and not exceeding $1,000 
in realty," according to the application for 
papers of administration filed by his 
widow, Mary E. AIL The papers were 
granted to her last week by Surrogate 
Cohalan. 



NEWARK HOUSE OPENS WELL 

. Nkwabk. N. J., Aug. 30.— The. Gayety 
Theatre,- playing. American Burlesque at- 
tractions for the first time, has just fin- 
ished lits". second week, and the business 
averaged ..over $4,000 each week. Dixon's 
"Big" Review", opened the house and 
;"G|rls, Girls, Girls" was this week's at- 
traction. - 



j CLOSES WITH HASTINGS SHOW 

; Camden, N.J., Aug. 30.— Malcomb, the 
juggler, closed with Harry Hastings' "Raz- 
de Dazzle ot 1919" here tonight. Burly 
Halperin, an eccentric comedian, has 
joined. He was transferred from H astings' 
Kewpie Dolls. 

*> JIOBDHSON SHOW OPENS . 

»— .... - .. .- .... . • 

' Woecesteb, - Mass., Aug. 28.— Charlie 
j Robinson's "Parisian Flirts" opened ■ here 

Monday. Although the -opening week, the 
.show looks like a winner for Robinson this 



MAKES GOOD AS SOUBRETTE 

Pauline Harer is now the ingenue 
soubrette of Drew and Campbell's "Liberty 
Girls." She jumped into the part during 
rehearsals when the soubrette who had 
been engaged failed to appear. 



KAHN'S CAST CHANGES 

Roy Sears and Jack Gibson opened at 
Kahn's Union Square Monday. Sylvia 
Edwards closed Saturday after one week 
at the house. 



LEAVE "MIDNIGHT MAIDENS" 
Bert Bernard and Yi Perry have closed 
with the "Midnight Maidens." Hughy 
Shubert has taken over the show as musi- 
cal director for the time being. 



LEWIS JOINS "MIDNIGHT MAIDENS" 

Sam Lewis has been booked by Ike 
Weber with the "Midnight Maidens." He 
left for Toronto last week to join the 
show. 



GOES INTO SPIEGEL SHOW 
Ben Rubin, who was with the "Cheer Up 
America" show last season . is doing the 
-principal comedy with Max Spiegel's "So- 
cial Follies" this season. 



COYNE'S SHOW READY TO OPEN 

. Tom Coyne's "French Babies" open at 
the Garden Theatre, Buffalo, Monday. 
This is the first show to open on the Na- 
tional Burlesque Circuit. 



1 ■ HAD $6,000 WEEK 

i- Cxevelasd, O., Sept. ;L — The "All Jazz 
Revue" put over a big sale at the Empire 

tlast week. They played to oevr $6,000. 
The show was liked. 



HAHN IN VAUDE ACT 

Dick Hahn, last season with Barney 
Gerard's Americans, is now in a big girl 
act; called "Cairo," playing the Keith 
time. 



. LEEWOOD TO CLOSE 

; Larry Leewood -will dose with the Lew 
Kelly Show at; the Empire, Newark, Sat- - 
urday night. He will be replaced by 
Billy Lang, who will also do black face. 



FORM NEW BLACKFACE ACT , 

Nevins, of Neving and Irwood, and Mack, 
of Mack and Antony, -have joined to do a 
new double blackface comedy act. 



ROW IN CLUB 

OVER LEASE 

RENEWAL 

NEW OFFICERS INSTALLED 



Following a disagreement, a special 
meeting of the Burlesque Club was held 
l&st week, at which the officers of the 
organization were asked to resign, and a 
new set of temporary officers immediately 
installed. 

The trouble arose when it was discov- 
ered that the officers in power had made 
no move to renew the lease on the dub- 
rooms, due to expire soon, and that they 
had planned to put the' furnishings of the 
club in storage. It was found that the 
treasury of the club was well filled and 
many of the members thought that some- 
thing should have been said- to them about 
the expiration of the lease before plans 
were made to store the furnishings, which 
would close the club.' 

A resolution was, accordingly, intro- 
duced, properly seconded and voted upon, 
requesting the resignations, of all three 
officers immediately, and a committee of 
four was chosen from the members pres- 
ent to see that the request was complied 
with. It consisted of Lou Sidman, Lou 
Reals, Phil Dalton and Meyer Harris. 

Upon the committee's request, Sam 
Dody and Al Singer then handed in their 
resignations, formally written, and H. C. 
Jacobs, president, offered his verbally. The 
meeting was then- adjourned until a later 
date. 

When the latter meeting was called and 
new business was in order, it was moved 
and properly seconded that temporary of- 
ficers be elected and installed, and the fol- 
lowing were put in: Will Roehm,- presi- 
dent; Lou Sidman, secretary, and'Dr. Subs, 
treasurer. It was also decided that open 
meetings were to be held hereafter on 
.every Friday night and that the officers 
were to meet on the first and third Fri- 
days in each month. Also, members are 
to hold social meetings once a month dur- 
ing' the Winter season, to' which they 
will be allowed to bring their friends as 
guests of the organization. The lease on 
the club is to be renewed at once. 

Among those who attended the meeting 
were: L H Herk, Sam Levey, Charles 
Baker, George Chenet, Lou Sidman,' 1 Phil 
Dalton, Rube Bernstein, Sam Sehoninger, 
Dan Goodman, Brad Sutton, Meyer Har- 
ris, Wash Martin, Lou Lessor, Lou Mario, 
Lou Reals, Dick Zeissler, Dave Leavett and 
Frank Leavett. 



. FAGAN BENEFIT NETS $4,000 

More than $4,000 was realized at the 
testimonial for Barney Fagan, old time 
minstrel and song writer, given at the 
Manhattan Opera House last Sunday 
evening. The fact that $4,000 was realized 
is quite a feat, considering that many 
whose names were on the programme failed 
to live up to their promises and did not . 
put in an appearance. The house was far 
from full. Tavie Beige, Savoy and Bren- 
nan, Will Oakland, Stella Maybew and 
Keith's Boys' Band appeared as well as 
Eddie Foy and his family, Frisco, Harry 
Cooper and Flora Starr, whose names were 
not upon the programme. 



UNIVERSAL GETS FRISCO HOUSE 

Saw Francisco, CaL, Aug. 31.— The 
Alhambra, redecorated,, renovated and re- 
named "The Frolic," has been opened as 
a straight run picture theatre showing first 
run Universal films. 



UNION SO. SHOW 



ITS 



J t 



IG BACK TO 

TIME SPEED 



Kaho's Union! Square was crowded to the 
doors Monday afternoon when the overture 
was played. TlKre are several new members 
in the cast this .'week. 

The iho>li ]n two parts called "Adolph 
and Rudolph" a?d "Out West." The comedy 
U- taken care o3 by Frank Mackey and Lew 
Lederer, who arl a couple ot bell bops In the 
first act and er*'are no end ot amusement. 

Brad Button Jakes care of several charac- 
ters. He opens as a Frenchman, portraying 
the part exceptionally well, tor he makes tip 
for the part as it should be. He also does a 
good "dope." woJfca atl ' 
Western character. 

Jack Gibson im the new 



trolght and offers a good 

straight." He 

. 1 makes a neat 

did an Englishman and 



with Ltederer "feeding'' him. 
"whiskey candy" bit was nicely put 



on Page 27 



has a good sinning voice and makes a neat 
appearance. H-t also 
an old Union Soulier. 

Roy Sears IsJ another new member of the 
company. He !> a Juvenile, and for his flrst 
performance hem did well. 

.Miss Lorraln;.* who left here early In May, 
. returned this ' Jeek. There Is hardly any 
change in her- Sappearanace other than she 
haa gained a Utile weight. Her rest has done 
her a- lot of f3od, as she looks bright and 
worked with if her old time snap. Mhi 
Lorraine Is a, hood "straight" woman who 
can read lines I and pot them over for the 
proper effect. Jler costumes are very attrac- 
tive and ber manners went nicely. 

Norma Bell ,1s another new . woman. She 
opened last w* •«. She Is the prima donna 
and her voice w la In good form' Monday after- 
noon, when hei numbers were well received. 
She delivered 1 rr lines well and .worked One 
la all the seem 1 In which she appeared. Her 
cortnmti plea* d and she still- retains ber 
pretty sjrure. j 

Little Grade! Howard, full of life and ac- 
tion, which bubbles over In all her work, 
stood out as a! Soubrette. She Is one. of those 
lltle girls who; la valuable to a company, as 
she not alone ehn put over a number, but can 
read lines ami .!■ never lost In a scene. Her 
work, when we caught the show, was of the 
usual standard; she always offers, and the 
patrons' at this house liked it. Her dresses 
are very pretty this week, also. 

The "room" .6lt was nicely carried ont early 
In the show by Lederer and Miss Bell, who 
.worked the scene up to' a good point. 

Lederer and' Sutton nut over the "dope" 
bit for the proper laughs. Button did the 
"dope" with Luderei 

The 
over by Mackey, 8ears and Miss Lor'rafne. 
The latter worked better In this scene than any 
woman we have yet seen, and the bit Is not 
very new. He* portrayal of one Intoxicated 
Is excellent. Mackey worked the bit up well 
from a comedyi standpoint. 

A dandy 'duet was offered by Gibson and 
Miss Howard singing "111 Hake Von Glad." 
They took several encores. 

The "screen" - bit, with Hlaa Howard In 
back of the screen, was pnt over well by 
Mackey, Lederer. Gibson and Sutton. 

The "necklace ' bit was put over nicely 
with Lederer, Mackey, Gibson and Hiss Bell. 
In fact, this bit went over much - better, than 
we have seen It done In a long time. There 
were several, extra laughs In it, also. 

Miss Lorraine's Scotch number was a suc- 
cess and took several encores. It was well 
staged. 

Another "candy" bla that went well was 
offered later. - But another bit would have 
been better on account of a candy bit being 
offered earlier in the performance. We know 
the "punch" Is the "rip" of the trousers, but 
it's a candy bit just the same. It went over 
nicely, however.' Mackey. Lederer, Sears and 
Hiss Howard appeared In it. 

The Western scene was carried out very 
nicely. The interior of a music hall in a small 
Western town furnishes the setting. There 
la a small stage where several of the chorus 
girls do specialties. Babe Qulnn and DoUy 
van do a sister set while Miss Wellington 
offers a dance as Farina. 
- Gibson and: Hlaa Howard do a corking 
good Texas Tommy dance that Is both fast 
and pretty. 

The scene between Hiss Lorraine as Prairie 
Nell and Sutton as Bill Bong, the bad man. 
was well acted. Both are good performers 
and the audience' was treated to a bit of act- 
ing here that was a little ont ot the ordinary 
for a burlesque bouse. This scene could 
easily have been spoiled by being overdone. 

Gara Zora offered the. same dance as last 
week and repeated ber success. -> ; 

Dolly Fields, staged some real good, number* 
that were a relief to look at. They were a 
novelty and very pleasing.- The girls looked 
pretty. f. . '-"..{. 8lJ>., 

DESMOND PLAYERS OPEN 
P vTTT.tng T.nna, Sept. 1, —Mae Desmond 
. Players, under the direction of Frank 
. Fielder and managed by Sam C Miller, 
opened the season at Zimmerman's New 
Orpheum here today, giving two per- 
formances. The play offered was "Folly 
with a Past'' , ) 



THE' NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 



MARRY VON 



Sensational Overnight Song Hit. A Wonderful Comedy Lyric by Andrew B. Sterling 

WHOA, JANUARY 



iYOU* 



GOING TO 



aa/o 



TH AI>J 



Here is 



Orches- 
tration 



Woids by 
ANDREW B. STERLING 



WHOA JANUARY 

(You're Going To Be Worse Than July) 
Tempo di Marcia 



Music by 
HARRY VON TILZER 




The first of Ju • ly _ 
Last . night in a dream 



they said Wd go dry 'And 

how. real it did seem A 




ev Ory .one thought- tkere'd be noth-ing to buy — 
raspber-ry sod - a all smothered withe 



But you. got yours and I got mine And 
Said peek - a - boo 111 get you soon - The 




cv - 'ry .one was hap - py we were fecl-ing fine But sojjjLwell be through_J— B then 

ti me Is corn-lo g when you'll hive to use a spoon They filled you I hear wit h 

won't wn f«el hlti* "^B" .w. mnrA mS\ tutar ttoat"have an - nlli-#r" Kounff Can -von niC-tnre me 



won't we, feel blue _i"^ No more we'll hear that"have an - oth-.er" sound'__ Can .•you pic-ture me. 
two percent beer But soon you'll be an ice cream sod -a hound— ■ There's drinks we c an pick — 



__ saying "Cim-mcsome tea'! 

but not one with a kick — 



When Mister Jan-u , - a - ry comes 'a -.round . . 
When Mis-ter Jan - u • a - ry comes a • round. . 




"rJCnT_£s_ 
an -. u - a - ry I hate to see you come 'round 



Whoa " Jan - u - a - ry, oh' " Jan . u - a- ry - 1, hate to . see you come 

Whoa Jan - u - a - ry, ' oh J 




_S Ju - ly was might • y tough 

, Ju - iy you made us think 



ve could ret e - nouglr " i 

...1.1 „'. »4 _ jjS i. i 



but we 

we could- n't get a drink 



And if we knew the 
But when we want - ed 




bar. man we.could get the. reg-'lar stuff. But oh ™ Jan-u-.a-ryi whoa V Jan-u- a- ry 
ome-thmg all we had to do was wink, But oh Jan... n • a - ry, whoa . Jan - u - a- ry 




I Yn so sad I want to - cry 
So long good old rock and rye 



You're the monththat'sgoingto make my life a wreck— 
Mis ter . Be. - vo nev. er made a hit with me 




I know I will turn lni*_to a hors-es neck Whoa Jan-u- a - ry when you go dry _ 
Cause it has -n't got the right au-thcr . i - ty Whoa Jan-u - a- ry when you' go dry_ 




__ You're going to be worse thanju - ly.. 

_ You're going to be worse thanju - ly. 



-iy- 

-iy> 



Copyright MCMXIX by Harry Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co., 823 W. 46'h St„ N.Y. 



I1DI1 



Sing It. 

Lots of 

Extra 

Choruses. 



ARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB. CO., 222 West 46th Street, New York City 



1 LOVKCM. 



ral Manaqcr 

CHICAGO-STATE L-V^t BLOC Sii 
EDDIE LEWIS. Pror. M S r. 



MURRAY BLOOM, ProiessiOnal 



bo?>ton'~j:o tremont st. 

BILLY HARRISON. Prol.Mji. 



PHILADELPHIA-KEITH THEATRE Bt.PC 

Suite 705— HARRY LINK, Pi of. M E .. 



September 3, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



-*-*■ 





LEO FEIST STARTS A, 
GREAT AD. CAMPAIGN 

$250,000 to Bo Spent During the Next 

v Throe Month* In the Big No- - .""• 

tional Magaxincm 

Commencing with next week's issue of 
The Saturday Evening 'Port,:- which will 
carry a full page advertisement,' the Feist 
house will fire the first .gun in a com- - 
paign of nationwide song popularization 
which will dwarf into insignificance any- 
thing ever, attempted in the world of 
music publishing. "; - 

To carry: this campaign to its comple- 
tion, which will' be the end of- November* 
an appropriation of $260,000 has - been 
made, and this great sum represents full 
page display h in the following national . 
magazines :' The ' Ladirs' }fomn Journal, 
American Magazine, McCaWs Magazine, 
Cosmopolitan Magazine, Everybody'* Mag- 
azine, Qood Housekeeping,' Metropolitan 
Magazine, Vogue, Hearst's, Medium's, The 
Delineator, Theatre Magazine. Woman's 
Home Companion, Pictorial Review and 
The Red Book. In addition to this a 
large amount, of special advertising ' in 
trade and other.- channels win be placed. 

With the exception of The, Saturday 

Evening Post Ad, which features four of 

the current Feist popular songs, -the big 

magazine campaign is to be devoted to 

but four numbers. Each advertisement 

'. is to be a full page, and the four, songs 

?' advertised are "The Vnmp," "My Baby's 

> Arms," "Sand Dunes," and "Lullaby 

: Blues." 

Sixty-four million readers will read of 
the songs in ' the widely circulated maga- 
zines,, and the popularity they will re- 
ceive 'in the) homes, -the. retail trade, and 
in the singing profession is' bound to be 
enormous. •" • V 

This great advertising campaign, which 
but a few years ago would be looked upon 
ss the height of folly, is now regarded 
as but a big. and far sighted business ven- 
ture of a' big house, one more indication 
that the miisic publishing business is go- 
ing ahead by - leaps and ' bounds and fast 
taking a prominent place among -the coun- 
try's' leading industries. 

SOCIETY GETS NEW MEMBERS 
The American Society of Composers, 
Authors, and Publishers,' during the past 
week added the . following to its member- 
ship list': . Cliff Hess,' Uda Wardrop, . Sid- 
ney Mitchell, Joseph San t ley, Milton. 
Ager, arid Joe. Rosey. The society during 
the past year has made remarkable finan- 
cial strides, and now has to its credit in 
its banks a cash balance of over $03,000.- 



$5 PRIZE WON BY DOERR 
Eddie Doerr" is the proud possessor of 
a Ave dollar gold piece won at a song 
contest held last ..week at Rockaway 
Heach. ■ He sang "Carolina Sunshine," 
and the judge in awarding the prize said 
that he didn't think much of the singing, 
but there was no doubt that the audience 
believed the song the finest number they 
had ever heard. . ' 



BERT GRANT SUED FOR DIVORCE 

Chicago, 111., Aug. 30:— Bert Grant, the 

Kong writer, has been _ sued for divorce 
by Ethel Grant, who charges him .with 
h a ving" broken bis marital vows. The 
suit .was filed in the Superior Court of 
Cook : -County. The couple was married on 
March 13, 1917, and lived together until 
Juno of last year. 

KATHRYN JOYCE OUT OF FEISTS 
Kathryn Joyce, who for the past three 
years has been connected with the band 
and 'orchestra department of Leo Feist, 
Inc., { severed her connection with the 
house last week. After a week's vacation 
she will assume the management of the 
McCarthy & Fisher band and orchestra 
department. 3?is: '^w^"^~**wp~* 



WHO OWNS "THREE CAVALIERS"? 

-. With the signing of ' the peace treaty 
and ; the resumption of business relations 
between this country and Germany and 
her allies, a number of foreign musical 
comedy and light opera productions win 
doubtless be made' when the theatrical 
season once gets .under way. 

One of these pieces; of which great 
things are' expected is "The Three Cava- 
liers," by Dr. Wulner and A. Berte'. The 
piece, was originally produced in' Vienna, 
where ■' it scored a big success, and was 1 
owned and published by the Viennese, firm 

; Of Eiiben, Schutz & Berte! Louis Berte, a 

'.son of A. Berte, has- been in America for 
several years, and during the greater part 
of the 'time has' made his headquarters' 
at the offices of Leo Feist, Inc. 

During the war period there naturally 
were no American productions of Vien- 
nese plays, although publishing and pro- 
ducing contracts for many were held. 

One of the pieces scheduled for presen- 
tation is the "Three Cavaliers," and as 
news regarding it was circulated-, the dis- 
covery that there . were several claimants 
to the American rights was made. 
Jerome H. Remick ft Co. claim the Ameri- 
can publishing rights, and state. 'that they 

.purchased them from Louis Berte, who 
represented . the Viennese firm, paying a 
substantial advance. M. Witmark ft Sons 
also claim the publishing and pro dining 

.'rights. as well, and also state that they 

' purchased them from Berte. 

At the- Leo - Feist offices, where Berte 
formerly was located, it was stated that 
he was no longer in any way connected 
with the establishment, and when the sub- 

' ject of .the "Cavaliers" was mentioned it 
was ' said' that the Feist house also laid 
claim, to 'the publishing rights of the piece 
by virtue off an arrangement with Berte. 
In the meantime the various claimants 
are looking "to; Berte far an explanation. - 

WHAT IS A SUGGESTIVE SONG? 

A Detroit amusement censor, who re- 
cently sent out a notice' to actors, giving 
them instructions regarding their perform- 
ances in the theatres wrote, among other 
things, "Don't aing a suggestive song I" 
Vaudeville actors state that there exists 
no reason for that portion of the notice 
as no suggestive songs are being sung, 
song writers to a' man deny ever having 
written such a number, and who can find 
a publisher that issued one! 

BELLE FROMME ON KEITH TIME 
Belle From me, the soprano, has re- 
ceived a route 'over the B. F. Keith time. 
She will sing a number of songs of the 
semi-high class type in addition to a 
popular ballad. For her popular number 
she hoe selected the Meyer Cohen song, 
"Mother's Rosary of Love." 

JOE COOPER SIGNS CONTRACT 

Joe. Cooper has signed a contract, by 
the terms of which he will write ex- 
clusively for the firm of Gilbert ft Fried- 
land for a term of years. His first song, 
which is to be released within the next 
few days, is called "Dixie Lee." ' I . , 

LITTLE PLACES. NEW SONG 

Geo. Little, writer of "Hawaiian But- 
terfly" has placed a new number with the 
Jack Mills house. It is called "I'm a 
Dreamer That's Chasing Bubbles," . 



SONGWRITERS ON KEITH TIME 
Frisch and Grossman, writers "of sev- 
eral successful popular songs are to ap- 
pear on the Keith time, beginning Sep- 
tember 1. 



PHIL. MOORE WITH JACK MILLS 

PhiL Moore has joined the sales staff 
of the Jack Mills, Inc., music house. > < 



PUBLISHERS LOOK FOR 

GREAT SONG YEAR 

- **• , ;tkj 
. • ft" ." «v*",-— — — - 
Opening of Season Proves That Opti- 

mi.tio Prealctioru of Music Men 

Are to Com* True. 

The opening' of the theatrical season, 
delayed by the actors' strike in the legiti- 
mate houses,, but well started in the 
vaudeville theatres' where the big percent- 
age of popular song hits are made, is show-' 
ing that .the seemingly exaggerated pre- 
dictions of music publishers regarding -the 
fall's music business were modest indeed. 

Never in the history of the popular 
music publishing business has there been, 
such a boom in early September. Prac- 
tically every publishing house is rushed 
with orders, and the big houses are so 
swamped with business that it has be- 
come not a matter of selling music but 
. the getting it printed that is the obstacle. 

Price has become a secondary consider - 
. ation, and the number of copies of a suc- 
cess which are selling at present is fully 
as great for the high priced numbers as 
those which go at the cheap rate. 

Tfie million copy song hit which the 
publisher of two decades ago only dreamed 
about is common to-day, and during the 
past year the three million copy distribu- 
tion has been passed. Publishers in close 
touch with business conditions are freely 
predicting that before the next twelve 
months have rolled around the five million 
song hit will be issued. 



HICKMAN'S BAND AT BILTMORE 
Art Hickman, the San Francisco com- 
poser, writer of "Tears," "Rose Room Fox 
Trot," "You and I," and other successful 
numbers in the Sherman, Clay ft Co. cata- 
logue, and conductor of the famous Hick- 
man Jazz band, which has' been a feature 
at the Hotel St. Francis, San Francisco, 
is in -New York: .. , 

Hickman and his band have been 'en- 
gaged to. make a: number of phonograph 
records for the Columbia Phonograph Co. 
and also are appearing nightly at the 
Hotel Biltmore. 



SINGERS WANT SHOW SONG HITS 

The strike of the actors which has 
closed" practically every legitimate house 
in New York, as well as seriously affect- 
ing theatres in Chicago, Boston and Wash- 
ington, is putting the publishers of the 
music of the musical comedies and. light 
operas in' an embarrassing position. , 

In all of .the successful shows there are 
a number of songs which have scored big 
hits and vaudeville performers have been 
looking forward to the time of their re- 
lease.. Now that the shows have closed 
with the reopening date indefinite publish- 
er! are being besieged for permission to 
use the numbers in the two-a-day bouses. 
Singers and a few producers of vaudeville 
acts Insist that 'the closing of the shows 
gives the release right Publishers en the 
other hand, are firm that the singing 
rights which were transferred to a produc- 
tion belong solely to the manager until 
such time as his production permanently 
closes or he gives the release right. In 
the meantime a number of singers are 
. rehearsing some of the hits of the big 
shows and intend to try to aing them In 
vaudeville or cabarets. 



BOB RUSSAK WITH MEYER COHEN 

— - Bob Russak is making a road trip for 
the Meyer Cohen Muiic Co. Jf " - --,-''* 



*' * BIG MUSIC CO. FORMED 

The International Music Company, of 
Indianapolis, Ind., is the latest addition 
to the ranks of music publishing com- 
panies. The new corporation is to be a 
strong - one- financially, planning an in- 
corporation with $600,000 capital. The 
new company intends to publish song and 
instrumental compositions in addition to 
a monthly musical magazine to be called 
the Popular Song Monthly. Frank Smith, 
an Indianapolis song writer, is one of the 
officers of the new company. 

NEW COMEDY SONG SCORES 

Harry Von Tilzer's new comedy song, 
"Whoa January (You're Going To Be 
Worse Than July)" is being featured by 
some of vaudeville's best comedians, and 
. each one using it is scoring a decided hit 
with the clever combination of bright 
comedy lyric and catchy melody. Lew 
Dockstader, one of the first to use it. Is 
compelled to respond to numerous en- 
cores every time he uses it. * 

COLUMBIA STRIKE SETTLED 
The strike of the Columbia Grapha- 
phone employees at the company's big 
plant in Bridgeport is over and the' men 
returned to work this week The record 
m a kin g department has been closed for 
several weeks, which has held up the mak- 
ing of a large number of song reproduc- 
tions from which music publishers had ex- 
pected big royalty returns. 

FEIST OPENS TORONTO OFFICE 

Leo Feist, Inc., has opened a branch 
office at No. 193 Yorige' Street; Toronto, 
Canada. Gordon B. Thompson is man- 
ager. ;..'- .. 
•a-,.- -.- ■■• ' - - -• --.:.- 



' PUBLISHED BY WfTMARKS 

"Bubble Land," the feature song of the 
new vaudeville act "Bubbles," staged by 
"the A. ft A. Producting Company, Is a 
dainty song attraction, as its title sug- 
gests. The vaudeville act described as 
a dream fantasy, is an ambitious pro- 
duction comprising five scenes, an! em- 
ploys the services of three clever people. 

Carle Sebastion sings the song "Bubble 
Land" and renders it with fine effect. The 
act scored a decided hit in Baltimore, 
where it played at the Maryland Theatre 
recently, and it will be seen in the Keith 
houses. 

.M. Witmark ft Sons publish the num- 
ber. 



HAMP A HIT IN NEW ACT 

Charles W. Hamp, late of the U. 8. 
Army, is scoring a decided hit with "Janet 
of France," a new vaudeville act Samp's 
bit in the offering consists of some excel- 
lent piano work and good singing. Hti 
featured number is the new Stern song, 
"I Found the Sweetest Rosa That Grows 
in Dixieland," a song that is far enough 
out of the ordinary to be called a unique 
"Dixie" number. 



STERN HAS NEW BUSH SONG 

One of the big applause getters in the 
current list of songs is "Let's Help The 
Irish. Now," a timely, tuneful number that 
has been described as en Irish song with 
a purpose. In that respect it differs from 
the usual run of Irish numbers. Frank 
Muilane was among the first to sing it 
and since he has been using it many acts 
are putting It on. 

VON T1LZER WRITES SHOW 
Harry Von Tiber- has completed the 
score of a new musical comedy which is. 
scheduled for a production in New York* 
this falL The -strike of the actors has 
delayed the plans, but it Is hoped to get 
the piece on before the holidays. 



OLMAN OrTWESTERN TJUP . 

Abe Olman.j the composer, who baa 

been in New i York" for the past two 
weeks left on Monday for a western 
business trip Jo the interests of the For 
ster Co., of Chicago. 



GLASON SINGS MILLS* SONG 

Billy Glason, who is booked solid for 
the next thirty weeks, is singing the new 
Jack Mills comedy song, "I Dont Want 
A Doctor." 



NEW MEDURESONG READY 
"I Want Somebody To Love "Me," a new 
ballad,, has been r e leas e d by—the- Peter 
Mcdure Music House of Hibbfng, Minn. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



:.- i 



■ September 3, 1919 



'TWILL CHARM YOUR HEART 




S 



i 



By KENDIS, BROCKMAN and VINCENT 



I 



L..)NE!iOME. SO 

« .* •.* - ■■-■■■ 



Another "Hawaiian Butterfly," Melody 
By the Same Composer. 





A Bit of Love, a Bit off Shamrock and Ireland 
Words by DANNIE O'NEIL Music by BILLY BASKETTE 



The lire of mysf sriouj China, blended wfth five American pep 

HON 





(HE CAME FROM HONG KONG) 

By HAROLD WEEKS 

The new song they're dancing and singing and humming 
and whistling everywhere 




*mmm*mmi - i.M;i-4j - 



BOSTON 
181 Tremont Street 

MINNEAPOLIS 
Lyric Theatre Building 



SEATTLE 
301 Chickering Hall 

NEW ORLEANS 
115 Unmnity Place 



ST. LOUIS 
Calumet Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Pantage* Theatre Building 



CHICAGO . •; 

Grand Opera House Building^ 

PHILADELPHIA "-" = 

Globe Theatre Building 



A Stone's throw From the Palace Theatn 



.September 3, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 





The Warmth off the Sunshine, the 
Charm off a Smile 

BY THE CAMPFIRE 

A Wistful Melody with a Lure That Is Fascinating 

Words by MABEL E. GIRLING Music by PERCY WENRICH 



Clean i ng up and no wonder ! 

AT THE HIGH BROWN 
BABIES' BALL 

A riot of .Jazz. Better than "Strutters Ball" 

By BENNY DAVIS, SID E RDM AN and ERNIE E RDM AN 




ST. In 



:w y< 



Next To the Columbia Theatre 



CLEVELAND 

Ellastone Building 

BUFFALO 

485 Main Street 



PITTSBURGH 
312 Camerpoone Building 

DETROIT 
213 Woodward Ave. 



TORONTO 

193 Yonge St. 



KANSAS CITY 

Gayety Theatre Building 

LOS ANGELES 

836 San Fernando Building 




20 



THE N E W YO RK G L IB P ETR 



September 3, 1919 









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Giving Her Own Idea of Gowns and Songs 



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81 -5f:--'\ CRI1TG5 SAY: ■ j ^^-|; : 

! iSTJ THE FEATURE OFFERING OFTHE AGE^ m:M§k. 

. , _, Splendid, soprano voice, A Charming Comedienne 
- -^' v - -wears magnificent gowns, has a choice bouquets b£ hew 
gsongs^of which "WILD, WILD MEN" is thd BIG HIT! 

Classy, and out of the ordinary, Song cycle with ''a lot of 
beautiful scenery and costumes! Her accompanist, Mr. 
Gabe Wellner, is one of -the best ever heard on the vaude- 

=iSi: !i "ville stage. .'.-..•. .-. &H&Wt?z'-?£ 






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Copyright No. 542462 

Words and Music by ZELLA NEVADA 



Copyright No. 452969 






Permonal Direction ; 

MACK 



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September 3, .1919 



fHt- HEW- YORK 'CiilfcWER 



21 



Vera Michelina has been engaged .'for '& 
'Once in a While." ,f wr: 

Joe Drum is doing the publicity work 
for the /'Greenwich Village Follies." . 

Ross Sobel, pianist, is. back in New York 
after spending four years in Europe. 



A10UT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



E. a Bickford, welfcknown in stock,- has 
been married to Grace Eileen Cooper. 

Fred Find is at the switchboard of the 
Majestic, Jersey City, again this season. 

Percy .Martin is planning to put out a 
few new tabloid «howa early in ^November. I 



Billy McCoy has returned from France 
and has been mustered out of the service. 



George Beane returned to Chicago re- 
cently after a season of vaudeville in the 

east. . "v :•■.'"..."' ,', - ■ ' 



Ruth Budd has been hooked by. Paul 
Durand to play the Keith time for thirty 
weeks. £j&- 



Pete Griffin has signed with McOart 
add" Brandon -and is appearing in their . 
new" act: ■: -..v •-".■ "V "■;'. ->"■• ■:"'/■..'- :: 



»--* . . i-".-' 



McGreevy and Doyle have a new vaude- 
ville act which they are presenting in 
Chicago. _ ;.:'■';„:•.: 

La Temple Company, two men and two . 
women, have a new act called "Plate Glass 
Illusions." 



George Gregory's six year old son died 
last week. Gregory is well known in the 
two-a-day. 



Barton and Ashley sailed for England 
last week, to tour the British Isles for 
two years. 



Joe Mack is at the New York Hospital 
where he underwent a serious operation 
for hernia. 



Harry Richards, after a short illness, is 
back at his desk in the Boehm and Rich- 
ards office. >•■ - . 



Anna Browning has been engaged for 
the Pauline McLean Co. now at James- 
town, N. J. 



The Seven Honey Boys opened on the 
Orpheum circuit last week, booked by Tom 
Fitzpatrick. -• 



Jennie McLoughlin underwent an opera- 
tion ^on her throat recently at;the Episco- 
pal Hospital. - '•"■ 



Paul Sahn » n d CoUette Southern are 
presenting a new act in the Chicago va- 
riety houses. 



Teddy Evans, wop comedian, is with 
a new three act which- recently .broke in 
out of town. -' • 



Carlson and Weiss have a new vaudeville 
act which they will present on the Keith 
time shortly. 



General Pisano, seen in vaudeville in his 
siarp-shooting act is recovering from a 
slight illness. ™- ' - 



George Buck, assistant manager at the 
Harlem Opera House, is laid up with an 
attack of grip. 



Paul Meacher, assistant manager of the 
Bedford Theatre, Brooklyn, is the father 
of a baby boy. 

Cap t. Paul Gordon will close as leading 
man for Jessie Bonstclle's repertory com- 
pany in Buffalo. • 



Mile. Fanshonette, who appeared with 
Anna Held in "Follow Me" is now in the 
ChurchiU cabaret. 



"in. H. Pnrro opened his season of 
stock at the Lyceum Theatre, Troy, N. T., 
on September 1st. 



Billy Boston and Minnie Vaughn have 
returned from France where they enter- 
tained the soldiers. . - jsjjfc jigfe 

Richard Wallace and John Hamilton had 
been engaged for "Luemore," before it was 

closed by: the strike. •/■ s? * ■■' 

Vera Meyiera-nee'been engaged by Stewart 
-and Morrison for -an important role in a 
new musical production. 

Frank Cork has been pronounced out of 
danger after an operation for appendi- 
citis at Lloyd's Sanitarium. 

Elizabeth Thomas, of the Mighty Doris 
Shows, and F. Snedecker, a snare drum- 
mer, were married recently. 

Lillian Foster is to appear with the 
Carroll and Forbes Stock Company at the 
Warburton Theatre, Yonkers. 



Frank . Harding,, an actor, ' was arrested 
last week on a charge of assaulting the 
superintendent of his apartment house. 

*r 

Oliver Eckhardt will play the Northwest 
territory - in "A Naughty Bride." He 
opened at Saskatoon, Canada, on Labor 

Day- - ■■■■>'•• '■"= •"'.. ' 

Will Marion Cook has arranged to pro- 
duce a new opera in London, where he has 
been a' big hit with his negro jazz or- 
chestra. 

F." H. Livingstone is director of the com- 
pany at the Auditorium Theatre, Lynn, 
Mass., where the Hefferon Players are ap- 
pearing. 



Bert Hanlon, who walked out; of "Scan- 
dals of 1919," the George White show; 
has opened on the Loew time in a vaude- 
ville act ; '' ''"'- "... • - k 



Eddie Goggin of the Seven Goggins, now 
playing on the Orpheum circuit, has been 
mustered out of the army and will rejoin 
the family. 



Gene Winchester and Charles WOlrina 
will be seen in a new act called "The 
Land Rowdies" shortly. Max 'Hart is 

handling it. 



William Reck is staging the musical 
numbers and : dances for the production of 
"What's the Odds," to be produced by 

Sam Shannon. - - 

Hairy Lansing -has been engaged as sub- 
marine traffic cop -for the -Neptune 'scene 
in "Happy Davs" at the Hippodrome, New 
York.. :- ■.-. ;.- 



Kane, Kearney and Moore could not ap- 
pear at the Orpheum, St. Paul, last Week, 
due to an accident. Reo and Helmar went 
on instead of them. 



C. Hubert Neuck, manager of the Lyric, 
Cincinnati, is 'back at his desk, following 
the reopening of , "the theatre. " 

Jimmie Kelly, the comedian, has entered 
politics and is a candidate for alderman 
in the eighth ward, Brooklyn. .- - 

/ - ^___^— 

Harry Houdini is appearing in person 
in conjunction? with the showing of "The 
Grim (Ja me" at the Broadway. 

Harry Thomas and Chick Hunt have 
completed rehearsing their new song and 
dance act, and- are breaking it in. 

Daisy Cailton, star of "An Irish Cind- 
erella," is visiting her sister Hazel, with 
the Charles K. Champlin Players. 



Ivan D. Anderson is the father of an 
eight-pound baby girl. Both father and 
mother are members of the Anderson- 
Gunn -Stock Company. 



Blanche Seymour and Ida Brooks ar- 
rived in New York last week after spend- 
ing a long time in France with the Over 
There Theatre League. " 

Alma Cluck and Efrin Zimbalist ate to 
give a -joint recital for the benefit 'of the 
Palestine Restoration Fund on November 
30 at the Hippodrome. 



Dorothy Clay, who is one of the models 
in the "Greenwich Village Follies," won 
two prizes at the Fashion Show at the 
Bitz Carlton last week. 



Pete Mack ' celebrated his eighteenth 
wedding anniversary recently and many 
of his friends on Broadway attended. 

Danny , Reed, ' stage director and actor, 
has been married, to Isadora Bennett. 
The ceremony, took place in Chicago- 
Joe P. Hamilton is now Joe F. Will- 
ard's team-mate in the vaudeville act, 
"Africa." :';BCttrry Weber is bundling it. 

Harry Haley, formerly of Haley and 
Mcintosh, has returned from France 
where he was with a Y. M. C. A. unit. 



Mabel Burke, who sings the animated 

song' numbers' at the Fifth Avenue, re- 
turned to that house after a vacation of 

six weeks, last Monday. * v 



Boahanara .has returned to New York, 
after making her debut on the speaking 
stage in "Kismet" in Indianapolis, with the ' 
Stewart Walker. Players . 

Louis Weslyn is writing the music for 
"Baseball to Boches," originally written 
as a farce by H. C. Witwer. It wiU be 
produced as a musical show. 



Marc Lobell and Emma Campbell' have 
been engaged for the Keith Players at 
Union -Hill, New Jersey. They opened 
with, the company this week. 

Gertrude Lesemann will be featured in a 
new act called "The Dream GirL" Eight 
people will be seen in the offering. 
Joseph Plimpton Horner wrote it. 

Lois" Chaifont, Laura Carpenter, Ida 
Brooks Hunt, Blanche Seymour, Elbert 
and Huntington and Mr. and Mrs. William 
O'Claire have returned from overseas. 



John 0. Grant, who was to have gone 
out this season with the "Oh My Dear" 
Company, is with Barney Gerard's "Some 
Show," on the American Burlesque Cir- 
cuit. 



J. Clarence Hyde and Ed Jack arrived 
back in New York last week, the former 
after an absence in the West of three 
months, and the latter after eight months' 
in France. . ' 



Frank Wirth, of the well known eques- 
trian family, is en route for America, by 
way of Marseilles. He has been appearing 
in England. '-- ... ''.-.•% 

Harry Stone, Bessie BerteH and' Florence 
Hughes will support Dermic Mullen in 
"The Man from Denver," which he is now 
rehearsing. 



Lucille Gevaaaugh was married in New 
York recently to Walter H. Le inert, a 
wealthy realty operator and financier of 

Oakland, California^. The bride will retire 
from the stage. 



. Edith HaBoT is to be starred in a film 
version of , "The Blue Peari,". which has 

be en. put into scenario form by Anthony' 
Paul Kelly. L. Lawrence Weber is to pro- 
duce the picture- 
Jack Haskell, formerly with "Four Jacks 
-and a Queen" in vaudeville and Marty 
Bloom, formerly with "Sailor" Eeilfy, have 
formed a partnership and will appear in a 
new vaudeville act. 



Jack Marrinyajnaeph Stanhope, Mrs. 
Thomas Eeeney and Hroy IBdns have been 
placed with Loren J. Howard's stock com- 
pany through the Bennett Dramatic Ex- 
change of Chicago. 



Mabel Keithley, who was to have gone 
on a trip to Detroit in . the interests of i 
Geo. W. Winnett, has&been forced to 
postpone the trip indefinitely, due to Win- 
nett s recent illness. 



H, S. Logan, manager of the Orpheum 
Theatre of Clinton, Illinois, was in Chicago 
recently on his way home from Indiana, 
where he spent his vacation. Logan made 
the' trip by automobile. 



Will Lea, who, several years ago, play on 
with the Three Lucifers, and who is the 
father of Emily Lea,- hss returned from 
France where he served for nine months 
as a Y. M. C. A. Entertainer. 



Walter McManus, who. was in France 
with the 77th Division and was a member 
of the Argonne Players, is back in the . 
United States and will shortly present a 
new two-act in vaudeville. ... * 



Paul Henry Wettphal in "A Peace Con- 
ference" will be seen on the Keith time 
shortly. Westphal resembles the Presi- 
dent and will impersonate the chief exe- 
cutive of the land in his new act. * < 



James Terry and Florence Searlea'-have 
been married. Terry has a number of con- 
cessions on the Harry K. Main shows. 
The bride is also in the .carnival business. 

Fred St. Ooge, while making a . fall 
from his bicycle at Keith's Boston Thea- 
tre, recently, gashed his leg, and is at the 
home of his parents at Boston. His in- 
jury compelled him to cancel a date at 
Manchester. 



Jim Powers, manager of the Majestic, 
Jersey City, has the following staff this 
season: Murray Seamon, treasurer, Morris 
.Levy, assistant treasurer, WQlism Morris 
advertising agent, and Earl Lscobris, 
chief usher. 



Madam Bartholdi, who has conducted 
the Bartholdi Inn st Briadway and Forty- 
fifth street for several years, is suffering 
from a stroke of paralysis which has af- 
fected her left side. She was at Weirs, N. 
II., when she suffered the stroke. 



Frederick John Balshofer and Dorothy 
Cashimir Segal have been married. • Bal- 
shofer is a motion picture director.. The 
bride was divorced twice, first from Louis 
Winch, a vaudeville performer, and then 
from John J. Collins, of the Keith office. 



Belle Bennett has signed for two years 
with David Belasco. ' She will be starred 
by him in one of his productions. Miss 
Bennett was the leading woman with the 
Alcazar Flayers at San Francisco for nine 
months prior to her signing with Belasco. 



Sergt Charles W. Hamp arrived from 
France on . Jury 15th, joined "Janet of 
France" in "vaudeville on' August 4th and 
was married on August 20th to Miss Eliza- 
beth Kephart, a teacher in the public 
schools of Al toons, Pa. Hamp will con- 
tinue in the act.. » 



Wallace Mackay, who has been in France 
during the last six months will sail for 
America in September. Mackay, who i 
played the part of the 'down in "The 
Witch's Forest" for John Wanamaker for 
two seasons, was made several offers to ' 
remain in France, but, since the salary he 
wanted -was not forthcoming, be decided to 
return to America. 



pm 




(TMj it X* Few Prwdtr) 



22 



THE NEW YORK ^CLlPjPER 



. September 3, 1919 










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September 3, 1919 



N E W Y O RX OL I PP E R 



23 



TWO BIG UNIONS RUNNING ACTORS' STRIKE 

(>.'■' :■ ; (Continued from p»g» J) 



A ailght fracas occurred on the sidewalk 
in front of the Shubert when one of the 
disappointed theatre patrons called a 
striker "a black-legged, musician." The 
musician asked a- policeman to arrest the 
roan who had ^'Insulted him, but the "cop" 
said that there' was only, a cause for civil 
action and that someone would have to 
use fists before he could step in. This 
started a lot of give and *ake between,, the t: 
musicians and the crowd, and It wasneces- ' 
sary to call the" aid of more; police to dlar- 
perse the crowd- . 

Because the moving ptcture operators re- 
fused to work on Monday at the Bronx 
Opera House, declaring It unfair. Sol Les- 
ser was unable to show his picture. 
"Yankee Doodle in Berlin" there. 

These are the theatres atill closed by 
strike: 



say- that the strike is costing them weekly 
a loss of $15,000. 

It was reported on Monday from Mil- 
waukee, "Wis., that George Tyler's "Tlllie" 
has been placed upon trucks that now re- 
pose in some of Milwaukee's alleys, waiting 
to be hauled out of- town. - 

When Tyler' moved into th*- Biackstone, 
Chicago, his "On The Hiring Line.'- he 
moved out of there his "Tlllie" production 
and sent It to the Davidson Theatre, Mil- 
waukee. Upon Its. arrival at the stage 
door, union officials'' and attaches of the 
theatre refused to unpack it, it is said, and 
it now remains awaiting further word 
from either Tyler or some union officials as 
to what will be done with It. 



"cohan"" and Harris. "The Royal 
Vagabond"; Knickerbocker. "Listen. Les- 
ter"- Century. "Chu Chin Chow"; Century 
Roof, "Midnight Whirl": Shubert. "Oh, 
What a Girl": Lyric. "The Five Mtlllqn'", 
Broadhurst, "The Crimson Alibi"; Repub- 
lic "A Voice in the Dark": Princess, 
"Nightie Night"; Gaiety, "Llghtnln'V: 
Globe. "She's a Good Fellow" : Forty-fourth 
Street. "Gaieties of 1919": Maxine Elliott, 
"S9 East": Amsterdam. "Zlegfeld Follies"; 
Cort "A Regular Fellow"; Amsterdam 
Roof. "Midnight Frolic"; Forty-eighth 
Street. "Those Who Walk In Darkness"; 
Selwyn, "The Challenge"; Astor. "East Is 
West"; Booth. "The Better "Ole": -Winter 
Garden. "Monte Crlsto. Jr."; Miller, "La, 
La Lucille"; Casino. "A Lonely Romeo"; 
Liberty. "Scandals of 1919": Comedy. "TJp 
From Nowhere": Bronx Opera House, 
"Yankee Doodle In Berlin" (a moving plc- 

The shows now running on Broadway 
are: Playhouse, "At 9.45"; Hippodrome, 
"Happy Days." which re-opened on Mon- 
day matinee; Fulton, "John Ferguson"; 
Greenwich Village. "Greenwich Vil- 
lage Follies." and Equity bills at the 
Lexington. Second Avenue and Thomas- 
chefsky Theatres. < 

The financial success of the Equity ball 
at the Hotel Astor has encouraged the 
Equity to give another dance carnival on 
next Monday evening at the St Nicholas 
Rink, where Mrs. De Wolf Hopper will act 
as hostess. The price of tickets will be 
one dollar. And on Thursday evening, Sep- 
tember 11th. yet another dance will be held 
by the Equity at the Audubon Ball Room, 
with Louise Huff acting as- hostess. There- 
after, the Equity will give a dance every 
Monday and Thursday evening as long as 
the strike lasts, with a different hostess 
for each dance. . 

Lyman Hess, with offices In the Candler 
Building, ha* been retained by the Equity 
to aid in defending some of the cases now 
in course of litigation. 

Despite the many rumors which have 
been circulated up and down Broadway to 
the effect that the strike Is ruining the big 
theatrical clubs, the Friars has prospered 
since the actors' and managers' war broke 
out. 

Regardless of a big decrease In receipts 
in one department, due to the prohibition 
law, the club's total cash receipts for the 
month of August are greater by over 12.700 
than they were during the corresponding 
month of last year. A number" of appli- 
cations for membership in the club nave 
also been filed during the last few weeks 
and but 'twenty-three have resigned. Of 
this number a bare half dozen are prom- 
inent in the theatrical world. 

The strike had never been considered 
from a hygienic standpoint until Dr. Royal 
S. Copeland, Health Commissioner, put In 
his contribution to the ever- increasing 
opinions and advices which are being given 
to the actors and managers by everyone, 
from bricklayers to Wall Street brokers. 
He said he feared that a prolongation of 
the strike might endanger the public health 
and pleaded for theatrical peace "to bring 
up the morale because resistance from dis- 
ease runs parallel with high morale." 

That the State Industrial Commission 
may investigate the present differences be- 
tween the Kqulty and the P. M. A. seems 
very possible, and in fact, Charles Shay, 
of the stage hands' union, strongly Inti- 
mated In a speech before a mass meet- 
ing at the Lexington Theatre that the 
unionists were trying to bring this about. 

The total losses for the first twenty-five 
days' duration of the strike amounts to 
more than $2,000,000. This does not In- 
clude losses to hotels, restaurants, rail- 
roads, cab companies, costumers, wlgmak- 
ers. scene builders, painters and other 
kindred lines which would be impossible to 
eitlmate. ' 

It is stated that the loss In . gross re- 
ceipts of closed theatres Is in the neighbor- 
hood of $245,000 per week, while the act- 
ors are losing a weekly salary of $120.- 
000. Other theatrical employees are sac- 
rificing $10,000 weekly. Every week the 
government is losing a huge war tax. The 
ticket agencies say that "business is rot- 
»-"" aDu> estimate their weekly loss at 
♦50,000. The printing trades were, before 
the strike, making about $10,000 a week 
from Broadway managers and the - bill- 
posters are now suffering a weekly loss of 
*8.000 as a result of the strike. Transfer 
ana trucking companies say that the strike 
means a loss of about $12,000 a week to 
tnem. Losses In salaries to directors of 
ifnearsals for one week is computed at 
•lo.ooo. Shop crews of producing firms 



TYLER OPENS IN CHICAGO 

Chicago, Sept L— The threat of George 
Tyler that he would positively rive his Sat- 
urday night opening of "On the Hiring Line," 
at tie Biackstone, became a reality. Police 
and detectives surrounded the Interior and 
exterior of the house, but no trouble appeared. 
Equity pickets, however, walked - about the 
street In front of the theatre, acquainting 
the pnbllc of the trouble. Large banners 
were also carried by actresses, stating that 
the Biackstone was unfair and requesting the 
pnbllc not to attend the performance. Dele- 
gates of the Equity were also noticeable about 
the house, Edward Neckels, Tom Wise, Will- 
iam Courtney, Walter Jones and Grant 
Mitchell forming an active committee in an 
effort to stop the presentation of the pro- 
duction. 

The curtain at the Biackstone rose sharply 
at eight thirty. The production was lively, 
and those in the cast are : Laura Hopes 
Crewes, Sidney Toler, Josephine Hall, McKay 
Morris. Baker Moore, Barbara Euard, Minna 
Gerabell, Frank Wilcox and Guy d'Ennery. 

Word received here late Saturday night 
brought Joy to the striking actors when they 
were Informed that the trouble would be en- 
tirely settled within the next ten days. Over 
at Equity, headquarters this was denied, the 
officials claiming it was a ruse to take the 

striking actors off their guard. 

In the meanwhile sllck-tongued men have 
been working among the- big commercial 
house*, soliciting funds . on behalf of the 
striking actors. Grant Mitchell immediately 
Informed the various business men and houses 
that no one has been authorized to solicit a 

ficnny for the organization, and those doing 
t are frauds. 

The attorneys, representing the theatrical 
managers and the actors. In the hearings be- 
fore Bigmund Zetsler, master ' in Chancery, 
met In the letter's office and agreed to a new 
adjournment until next Thursday at 10 :80 
a. m. It was announced from New York that 
the case was not ripe -enough to be tried at 
this early date. . 

With a matinee on Labor Day, the Equity 
started a show at the Auditorium with the 
following. cast: Blanche Ring, Charles Win- 
nlger. W. C. FieldB, Ada Meade, Cblc Sale, 
Van ft Schenck. Walter Jones, Tom Wise, Wm. 
Courtney, Joseph Santley. Ivy Sawyer, Don- 
can Bisters, Grant Mitchell, Zoe Barnet. Pearl 
White and Frank Fay and other stars. 

The striking actors have held a dance 
which is said to have netted them in tbe 
neighborhood 'of $2,500. It was held In the 
Princess Dance Ball, 1510 W. Madison Street, 
and 600 stage favorites and lesser lights at- 
tended. Hazel Dawn and William Courtney 
led ' the grand march. Among others who 
were there were Etnily Miles, Thomas Wise. 
Helen Menken. Samuel Hardy, Grant Mitchell, 
. Evelyn Council, William Ehrot, Arnold Erat, 
Willie Howard and - Franclne Larrimore. 
. In the meanwhile the Rialto, Majestic, Co- 
lumbia, Star and Garter, Mcvickers Hippo- 
drome and Statehtke Theatres continue to 
play to tbe greatest business in their careers, 
which is due to the fact that these houses 
are the only ones permitted to remain open 
here. Long lines wslt slong the walks hours, 
awaiting an opportunity of securing a seat In 
the spacious theatres. 

"A Gentleman .from Mississippi,"' which 
was to have been' presented by the Equity 
here, never made its promised debut, because 
Dudley HaWiey, Hazel Dawn and four other 
actors developed eleventh hoar temperament, 
with the result that the rehearsals blew up 
jmd there was no show. It has been the 
Equity's intention to resurrect this play and 
parts had been assigned to twenty or more 
striking stars. Also the show bad been 
booked in a number of surrounding cities, 
starting' with Jollet. Lack of team work and 
"too many cooks" caused tbe fiasco. 



ALL BOSTON HOUSES CLOSED 

Boston. Sept. 1. — Actors, musicians and 
stage hands at the six Boston theatres offer- 
ing legitimate drama went on strike simul- 
taneously today, just before the Labor -Day 
matinees: For the first time in this city 
thousands of theatre patrons were deprived 
of their favorite- form of amusement. 

The action of the union musicians and 
stage hands made the strike' effective, -for, 
acting under orders of their international of- 
ficers, they walked out when the members of 
the actors anion failed to report for the af- 
ternoon performance. -' 

• At tbe Tremont Theatre it was a seventeen- 
year-old chorus girl, Helen "Kathleen" Car- 
roll, who precipitated the strike. She was 
present on the stage, together with all the 
other members of the "See Saw" Company, - 
until a few minutes before the curtain call, 

(Continued on page 29) 



HAILED AS ANOTHER CARUSO 
London, Aug. 30. — Fernand Amman, a 
Belgian tenor who went through the battles 
of Yser and Dixmude and has undergone a 
stay in tbe German prison camp at Ruhle- 
ben, ia the talk of musical circles here, 
where be is hailed as another Caruso. 
London critics and the local public are all 
wildly enthusiastic over him. Anseau 
sprang to fame in one night a abort time 
ago, when be sang, the premier role in 
"Pagliacci." Experts are unanimous in 
acclaiming, his greatness,' comparing him 
with the famous De Rente. He is twenty- 
nine years of age, modest and unassuming, 
his personality being one which makes him 
liked. 

Anseau made bis debut at Dljouin 1913, 
and was successful. He -was engaged for 
the 1914 season in Paris, but the war tem- 
porarily halted his career, and be was 
actively engaged in fighting until the end. 



WINS BREACH OF CONTRACT SUIT 

London, Em?., Aug. 29. — Madame Rosa 
Abraham, a dancing instructress, has been 
given a judgment against William Clark- 
son, a costumer, for $900, she having sued 
for $825. '..'.' 

Mine. Rosa claimed that Clarkson had 
engaged her to hire a ballet of thirty -six 
girls to appear in Paris, and that she was 
to go with the act, at a salary of $75 a 
week; "She says be dictated an advertise- 
ment to which she received many replies, 
and, ' after assembling tbe ballet twice, 
found that she had been buncoed. 



PLAN TESTIMONIAL 

London, En*., Ang. 29.— Before tbe 
closing of His Majesty's Dundee, as a dra- 
matic house, take* place, Harry W. Ram- 
say, who has been connected with tbe the- 
atre for almost, twenty yean, will be given 
a testimonial. Tbe committee in charge 
of arrangements is composed of non-pro- 
fessional men. Tbe affair will take place 
on October 8, by courtesy of the owners 
and the management of the visiting com- . 
pany. -• ■ - 

'TOPSY-TURVEV REVIVED 

London, Eng., Aug. -29. — "Topsy-Tur- 
vey" has been revived and several new 
scenes introduced, after tbe book had been 
rewritten. In the cast of tbe piece are- 
Claire Romaine, Agnes Croxton. Tom 
Drew and G. S. Melvin. The piece is 
now at tbe Kensington. 



TO REVIVE "MICE AND MEN" 

London, Eng., Ang. 29. — Frank Forbes- 
Robertson', who has been touring in- "Dear 
Brutns," and who, next season, will be 
seen in a Martin Harvey production, ia to 
enter the managing field on bis own accord 
next year, -when be will revive "Mice and 
Men." ' 



QUITS VARIETY ARTISTS OFFICE 

London, Eng., Aug. 90.— Fred Russell 
baa resigned as chairman of the Variety 
Artists Federation. His resignation will 
take effect in September. 



"EQUITY REVUE" 
NEEDS LOTS OF WORK 
TO PUT IT OVER 

The Actors' Equity Revue, which opened st 
tbe Second Avenue Theatre on Labor Day 
matinee, la a potpourri that was assembled 
and staged in leas than three days of re- 
hearsals and which, although it has Its good 
spots, has too many weak momenta to suc- 
ceed In anything like its present shape. 

Perhaps, as Eddie Kent announced to the 
audience, the revue was gotten together In a 
much shorter time than the Broadway re- 
vues that we are accustomed to. But, on 
the other. hand, the Equity show seems to be 
a living argument for longer rehearsal pe- 
riods. For, after all, the audience la paying 
its good money to see the show and an an- 
nouncement that "the show Is still new and 
will be much better In a week" hardly ap- 
peases the man who paid his money into the 
box office to see it In Us present shape. 

Happily, the production has its brilliant 
moments. Far and above all stands the work 
of James Barton, whose grotesque dancing 
never tired and whose comedy la inimitable. 
When tbe fact of the matter Is, that the 
Equity was satisfied to close its show' with 
a solo dance of Barton's, rather than with 
tbe customary "flash finale," It can easily be 
seen bow Important Barton's bit was to the 
success of the piece. 

Tbe Revue ran wild, without any particular 
reason for Its different scenes, and while this 
might be excused In a Zlegfeld or Winter 
Garden production, where lavish costumes 
and artistic sets can cover a multitude of 
inconsistencies, the hodge-podge make-up of 
the Equity show was forever apparent. 
Chorus girls forgot tbe words to their songs, 
and In parts each seemed to have a -daaca 
routine all her own. Nor were the principals 
far ahead of the chorus, for In the big num- 
ber of the play, which was a song about the 
Equity that an the audience were anxious to 
hear, the principal singing It forgot his most 
important lines. . 

The Revue smacked of a burlesque show, 
but lacked much of its punch. 

The opening scene — a golf links at Great 
Neck— was Terr slow ana some alleged com- 
edy in the hands of Matt Hanley and John 
Goldswortby dealing with the game of golf, 
killed It The Revue seemed tuneless, snil 
"Turkey in the straw" was the most popular 
number In the opening part. 

Tbe Equity Sextette, comprised of Arthur 
Burckly, Arthur Cunningham. Nora White, 
Sarah Edwards. Ben Franklin and George 
Bonnes then livened up things a little be- 
cause their voices blended well. But their 
choice of such rubber-stamp selections as the 
sextette from "Rlgoletto." "On the Road to 
Mandalay," and ''Flnikull Flulnkuls" made 
tbe act ordinary. 

A burlesque on "John Ferguson'' had many 
bright moments and was well worked out, but 
to an. audience that had never seen the real 
play the burlesque was like so much Creek. 

Marie Nordstrom divided her well known 
specialty act Into two parts, and on each ap- 
pearance proved a cheerful relief to what had 
preceded her. 

Phil Dwyer, aa the dog, "Rover," did a 
commendable 'bit of acting. 

By far the best scene In the play was the 
"Rag Time Ball Club" and It justly won 
warm approval. 

DeHaven and Nice, and Plerson and Mc- 
AniiftV were two dancing teams that worked 
hard and deserved all the applause that they 
received. In fact. It was the dancing that 
redeemed the revue throughout. 

Roger Gray, Dan Marble and William Kent 
were all on the stage considerably and worked 
hard In comedy roles tbat gave little chance 
for real laughs. 

Those In the revue could score a hit with 
a different vehicle, but a revue without com- 
edy, songs or rehearsals cannot, of course, be 
very effective. Wftb more rehearsals, how- 
ever, the show can be Improved. 

Others In tbe play whose names appeared 
on the program were Matt Hanley, Alsm 
King, Frank Donegan, Ellen Best, Dora Til- 
ton. Dorothy Tureck. and Charles De Haven. 

There were about fifty persons In the 
chorus. H. J. O. 



CHICAGO NEWS 



OUTDOOR SEASON CLOSING 

Tbe outdoor season here is fast drawing 
to a close. With most of tbe downtown 
theatres darkened by tbe strike, thousands 
have found a new elixir for the cure of 
ennui at the various outdoor parka. River- 
view and White City are ending their 
season about the middle of September, after 
what is reported to have been one of the 
most prosperous seasons in years. Al G. 
Barnes circus is appearing at White City 
to good business. A baby show will be held, 
at the park Sept 6-7, and this will be 
followed by the usual carnival, which will 
close the park for tbe Winter. 



MERCEDES GETTING SET 

Mercedes is "setting" his road show here 
and will leave this city next -week. He 
appeared all week at McVickera, where he 
drew considerable business. Jack Dracker, 
of New York, is going to manage tbe show. 



PAID $1,315,000 FOR SITE 

According to the deeda filed for record 
Friday, Balaban and Kati paid $1,315,000 
for tbe property at tbe southeast corner 
of State and Lake streets, the site of the 
proposed $1,300,000 motion picture theatre. 
Erection of this bouse will be started late 
this year and, when completed, it will be 
tbe largest motion picture theatre in tbe 
country. ■ 

PALACE RESUMES VAUDEVILLE 
The Palace Music Hall opened Monday 
morning with a vaudeville program of 
nine - acts, starting its vaudeville season. 
The house will continue playing vaudeville 
until next Summer, when, undoubtedly, 
another 1 Shubert production will- play tbe 
usual Summer engagement there. 

■PflW -SAM 

(TTkit it not a Ptct Pmttr) 



24 



THE'. NEW YtXRK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 




Specialty Artists and Pianists 
for Vaudeville Productions 



BY 



JO PAIGE & PATSY SMITH 



VAUDEVILLE BROKERS 
Room 1004 - - 



Palace Theater Building 



HEADLINING THE OPENING OF 

B. F. KEITH'S 81st STREET THEATRE THIS WEEK (SEPT. 1st.) 

SEABURY & SHAW ; 

- • -i Present 

BILLI E SHAW & 

- WIT M 

DAWC llfUITP GEORGE EBERLE -- - JOHN GOOD 

M V t If nllfi) AND HARRY SQUIRES 

IN A GORGEOUS MINIATURE PRODUCTION— THE COSTLIEST OUTLAY IN VAUDEVILLE.: 

DIRECTION ARTHUR KLEIN 







RETURNED ON THE CARMANIA AUGUST 27th 

FOR 
The Truth Concerning Conditions in England 



K BERT LAMONT The Act Doctor 



SOS PUTNAM BUILDING., NEW YORK 

ACTS WANTIHG IMMEDIATE TIME ABROAD, 



Phont BRYANT 3989 
CALL 



A Card of Thanks 

... _ ML AMD MRS. JAS. E. (BLUTCH) COOPE2 desire to take this mean* 

of thanking their kort of friends for nil kind inquiries, du rin g the recent illness 

of BLUTCH COOPER. 

They wish to iufultu all friends through this med iu m, as it is impossible to 
reach each one personally, that Mr. Cooper is now on the road to recovery, and 
hopes in a short time to be with them again. 



WANTED 



A DIVING TANK 

Must be in good condition . Address M. T. MIDDLETON, Victoria Theatre, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



WHEN IN BOSTON LOOK US UP 



JAY BEE AMUSEMENT COMPANY 

producer* of Recruits Wanted, with Jack McGowan and the Y. D. Maids aud other S. R_ O. 
Comedies. Also working Billy Sslliran, the producer from "over there." Can use Sister 
Teams, abd tack on scenery. Address 34 School St, Bos Inn. Mass. 



It Gets Them and Pleases Them All 

And It Will Please Yon. Get It and Use It for the Coming Season. Our Great 
New Song Hit, 

"When I'm Strolling With You" 

Words and Music by ISAAC ROSENTHAL 

Beautiful Lyric Charming Melody. , A Dandy Fox Trot. 

Price, 15c Per Copy. Orchestra, 25c 

Professional Copies and Orchestration Free to Recognized Artists. 

AHRENBEE MUSIC COMPANY, Publishers. 

218 South Wabash Arenne Chicago, IlEnoU 



ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY 

RAY ALVINO SZ JAZZ PHIENDS 

Formerly with Bessie Clayton; Joan Sawyer, Dimwina Room, Broadway. A sensation at 
the Teck. Buffalo. pTnnnrnrs of "Jsxi without Jars.'' Open for the season of UUMKS. 
DAVE SCHWARTZ. Musical Director, Suite S4S, SW Fifth Ave, N. W. Cor. «2ad St, N. Y. 



J1MMIE 



EDYTHE 



DWYER&MAYE 



WORKING 



September 3, 1919. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



B. F. KEITH VAUDE. EXCHANGE 

nw TOIX CITY. 

mianlna- *n*ra Hamilton^— Mm«. ' Herman— 
ouen * Johnson— Diane A Bubiui — Frisco A Co. 
—Carlos natustisn A Co. — Frank Crummlt. '' 

Colonial— Barr Twins— Beads* Shone * Co. — 
Alfred Farrell * Co.— Ferri— Fallen * Brown— 
Stanley A Blmes. 

I ^n.-— i i M Mmnn ft Desgon — "Toot Sweet" 
— Kranl * LaSaUe—Nonette— Mason A Keeler— 
Texas Comcdr Four — Dancing -Donni — "Bagged 

Edge. 

Boral— Jack Inglls — "Rainbow Cocktail" — 
Haekett A Delmar— Elizabeth Murray— Plelert A 
Seoneld— Two Jeetera. . ... . . 

BB00KLT5, N. T. -. • ' • 

Orpheam — Craig Campbell — J— and ' Na.nl 
Octette — Brlndel A Burt — Breen Family — Mc- 
Maboo-Diamood A Co. — Lew Dockztader — "for 
Pity's Sake." 

Bash wick— Lee Kohlmer A Co. — Camilla's Birds 
— Columbia A Victor — A. Bobbles A Partner — 
Morgan A Kloter— MiUershlp A Gerard. 

Henderson's — For d Slate rs — Beed A Tucker. * 

_ BUFFALO. 

Saea'a— Myers A Noon— Zardo — J alia Kellety — 
Worden Bros.— Donald Slaters— Helen Gleason A 
Co. • • . 

BALTIMORE. 
Maryland — M. A X« Dunedtn — Billy Glason— 
Sully A Boughtnc— Moseonl Bro* — Aaahl Japs- 
Margaret Young. ' 

" BOSTON. • . - A 

Keith'Sr-rHerman > A Shirley — Smith A Austin — . 
Gretchen' Baatman— Qulxey Four— Howard A 
Clark— Transneld Bisters— Marine Bros. A Bobby. 
COLTJatBITB. 
Keith's— EUnore A WlUlama— TJ. S. Atlantic 
Fleet JaszTBand — 'atnw.Wenington'a Surprise" — . 

The Magleyi. . , 

' fi -' 7 " CTXVELAHD. . 
Hippo.— Dare - Bros. — Bae Bamoeis— Joggling 
Nelsons— Wright A :' Dietrich— lew Haw run — 
Camming* A White-^-Hallen A Hnnter — Bogb 

Herbert A Co. . . - - . .- 

- *. -o .« IBETBOXT. 

Temple— Llda awasssseaj ' A Co.— Joe Towle— 
Briscoe A Beuh—Psge, Back A alack— Pblna A 
Picks— "McGlnty Kids"-,- Marion k Weeka—Wln- 
s ton's Water Lions. 




. ■ '_. ' , 



For Next Week 



LOS 

Orphean — Marguerite Sylva — Gibson A Connelll 
— Elfreda Wytm — Marlon Harria— Oscar Lorraine 
— Lambert!— La Bernlcle A Co. 

MILWAUKEE. 
Gieen — Libonatl— Everest's Clrcoa 
Mason A Bero U^ -Maater Gabriel A Co. 

Orpheum— Donovan A Lee — Ernest Evans A Co. 
— Sam Fearn — Francis R enault. 
MEL W A TJHXE. 

Majestic— Spanish. Dancers — Edith Clifford- 
Bernard A Duffy— Green A Byre— Peggy Bremen 
A Bro. : 



(Second Halt)— Merlon 
- Crackles — ElUe Nowlan 



••"Winter Garden Girls" Co. — Ctccolinl 
—William Bat— "Colour Gems" — Karl Emmy's 
Pets— Kanaxawa Japs — The Sbsrrocks. 
aTEW ORLEANS. 

Orpheum— Geo. MaeFarlane — Blgoletto Bros.— 
Bradley A Ardlne— Lewis A White— O'Donnell A 
Blair— Sails Bros. ." • ■ ■■■ •?-■ ". 



Colonial— Bekona — Wilson Bros. 

BaLUm RAFQW. . 

Empress— Ann Gray— Chick A Cb Icklets. 



Lyrlo — Samuel A Leonhart — Mason A Gwynne — 
Clslre A Attwood — Fr ed S. Paine. 

LOWELL. . . . 

Keith's — Chan, Grapewin A Co.— Sylvester, A 
Vance— Walsh 4 Edwards — El Cota— V. A B. 
Stanton — Jim Jaaa King — Pleefc A Whiter 

MONTREAL. "" ' 

Princess— Jack LaVier— YaUeclta's Leopards— 
J. A S. Leonard A Co. — Hallen A Fuller— Marmeln 
Sitters A S. — The Leightoas. 

POBTXAHD. 
Keith's — Canton Three — Geo. Yeomans — Eddie 
Heron A Co.— Done ClebritJes— Lccy Brucb— 

Miller A Mack.- - — - ' - 

PTTTSBTJBOH. . . 

Davis — Allan Boxers — Prosper A Motet — Three 
Mori Broa.— Ward A ▼an— Helen TBbc A Sister. 



Keith's— Belle Baker— CMeffi A Keller— La 
Moat Trio— Los Rodriqces— "15,000 a. Year"— 
Bolmea A We IU— "Mo Oettc Bat ters. 
PROVIDENCE. 
Keith's— "Kiss Me"— Rinaldo Bros.*'— Powers 
A Wallace — Byan A Healey— Martyn ' A Florence 
— Laagford A Fredericks. 

ROCHESTER. .- 
Temple— Sidney Phillip*— Bailie Fisher A Co.— 
The Brlants— Brown Sisters— Leon Varrsrn— Pot- 
ter A HartweU— J ason A Hal g — Conlln A Glass. 
- - SYRACUSE. 
Tempts sfsry Howard A Co. 

TOLEDO. - 
Keith's— Bae' E. Ban A Bro.— "Piling the For- 
naee"— Lady Oga Towaga Co. — "Old Time Dar- 
kles"— Three Nitos — Moslem's 'Ballet — BBly Bon- 
ner A Co. .-. t. ■ 
TOB0BTO. 
Shea's — Diamond A Brennan — Bordlnl A Glta 
Rice— Wallace Galvln. 

WASHINGTON. 
Keith' a — CacntaaB Verona — "TJ. S. Glee Club" 
—Bessie Clifford— Walter C. Kelly— Sinclair A 
Gasper — Lillian FlttgeraTd — Dancing Kennedys. 



Gsrriek— "Melody of Tooth"— "Worth Waiting 
For"— Anger A Backer/ — Hughes Duo. 

YOTTHOSTO WST. 

Hippo — Larry Comer— Imhot, Conn A Corine— 
Bonita A Hearo. .,...- > ,'.• 



ORPHEUM 



•■v" 



CHICAGO. TTT 
P alac e Grace La Boe — Bankoff A Co. — Toto — 
Corinne TUtao— Kltner A Beaney— Paul A Walter 
Wane. 

aujeitio — "Overseas Bene"; — Heartland — Etner- 
son 4 Baldwin— The Pick fords. 

State Lake — Primrose Four — The Lengdons — 
Jerome A Herbert— Geo. Price— Owen McGlveney 
—Seven Glasgow Malda — Harry Tlnney. 
CALGABY. 
Orphemn— Stone A Kalis— Norton A Lee— "Yip 
Tip Yaphahken" — Meleta Boneonl — Sybil Vane- 
Brs. G. Hoghea A Co.— Bell A Wood. 

DZS at OXhTES. 

Orpoenm— Frank Dobson A Sirens — Lloyd A 
Welle— Barry Bolman A Co.— Flo A OlBe Walters 
— - N'ita Johna<m — Brodean A SllTennooa — La Bee A . 

Dupree. .' 

OKfJVEB. 
Orpheam— Mme. EUls A Co.— Belgian Trio— Carl 
Jom— "Tango Shoes" — Begay A Lorraine — Ja Da 
Trio— Bart .A Bosedele. 

• -. BTJIT/TH.- 
Orphanm— AJhertina Ranch A Ballet— Comfort A 
King— Norwood A Han— Enarnm— Melnotte Dno— 
Bot, Tip A Co. — "Sweeties"— J. J, Morton. . ' " • 
S '. XABBAS CTTY. 

Orphavim-^Morgan Dancers— N.ewhoO A Phelph 
~ E - A J. 'Connelly— Espe A Dutton— Clifford 
Walker— Garcbmetl Broa.— The Sterlings. 
UXOOLV. 
Orphean— Trtrie Prigsnsa— Janls A Chapkrav— 
Harry Bines— Shelah Terry Co. — Clifford A WlUa 
— Nathane Bros.— "Birds of a Feather." 



Orpheam — "An American Ace" — Daver Fergnaon 
A Co.- — Hersh^l Henlere A Co.— Dnnham A Ed- 
wards — Williams A Mitchell — Three Jahss. 
POBTLASD, OBEOON. 

OTphenm — Jnllus Tannen— Will Ward A Girls 

Bryan A Broderlck — Go* Kelley A Co. — Frankte 

Heath — Royal Gaseoimee. _L— . . 

ST. PAUL. 

Orpheum— C. 8. Jas* Band— Steven* A Homate'r. 
—Robbie Gordone — Weber A Radnor— Maboney A 
Auburn — Ljdell A Haeye — Lachman Slaters. 
SEATTLE. 
Orpheam — Nash A O'Donnell— led Doner— Don- 
ham A. O'Malley — Rosa King" Co. — Bay Snow 

The Seebacks. - ' . . 

.ST. LOUIS. ... 

Orpheam— Dolly Kay— Bob Hall— Nina Payne— 
Whitfield A ' Ireland — Van Cellos — Bender A 
Meeban — Enos r'raser. ... ■• - 
.-.: ' .- SALT LAKE CITY. 

Orpheam— Harry Watson A Co.— Nelson A Chain 
— Oliver A OIp — Mason A Forrest — Chinese Brass 
Band — The Bradnas. • - ■ - 

, ■ SAB FBABGLSCO. 
Orpheum— Bessie Clayton A Co. — "Current of 
Fen" — E. A J. Crelghtoo — Harden A Ercelle — The 
. Vlvlaha— Sntter A Dett-^"Rntting U Over."- 
=.. 4 FIOTOBIA. ; 
Orphanm— Stone A Kails— Morton A Lee— "Tip 
Yip Yaphankers" — Maleta Boneonl — Sybil Vane^ — 
Mrs. G. .Hughes A Co.— Bell A Wood. 
" VAVCOTTv-ES, 
Orphanm — "Not Yet Marie" — Marterle — Sidney 
A Ttownley — Donald Roberts — Farrell Taylor A 
Co. — Kane. Morey A Moore — Jack Marley.. 
WlKHlPfO. 

Orpheam — "Beckleae JBve" — Nellie NlehoU 

Murphy A^ WhiterrMUe.._Nan>— Edarln George 

E. A T. Alexander. 

■ BLrF. Hzrnrs 

BtLLLsTOI, MOST. 
iPV* »S'n— Charlee Ledagar— Ward A Howard 
— Violin Misses -Grace De Winters— Hack Haw- 
kins A Co. (Last Half) — Frank A Clara La Tear 
— Kathryn Miller— Davis A Castle— Three Boys and 
. a. Girl. • v-j . ' ».. . ■ 

' «. . ■ _ • FT, WAYBE. tBTJ. 

I Palace (First Half)— Arthur La Vine A Co.— 

Kamtnerer A HowUnd — Allen A Betty Lelber 

Beulna; Along. (Last Half)— Blslto A La' Mont— 
J. AW. Hennl nea— N eel Abel— Six Gypaiea. 
LIVTSOflTOB. JfOBT. 
Btraad— rLa Tour— Kathryn huller— Davis A Cas- 
tle — Three Boy* and a Girt. 

LAFAYETTE. T5T). 
Family (Last Half)— KcNntt A Brelyn— Leroy 
A Harvey— BIB Prnltt— Delton. Ifareena A Delton. 
L0OAHSP0BT. IBS. 
Colonial (Last Halt)— Fulton . A Mack— Arthur 
La Vine A Co. — gowlan d. Irwin A Howland. 
■ : MUtULEOOaT, KTCat. 
Bacaat (FIrat Half)— Fred A Dot Norman— Dale 
A Bovle — Mr. A Mrs. Melbume— Mabel Harper A 
Co.— Three Ander Girls. (Last Half) — La Toy 

: Bro*. — Kam merer A Howland — Burke A English 

' Jack Oaterman. 

BO. YAKIMA, WASH. 
Empire (First Hslf )— Boll Beer Indians — BuaaeU 
A Bell— Steed's Syncopated Sextette — Browning A 
Davis — NeBie Bennett's Athlete*. - (Lsst Half) — 
Marlon Mnnson— Hsll A - Tyson— Jack A June 
Laughlin— Lew Ward— BiHy * Sina Crackles— 
Bills Nowlan *fTrtrnv*. 

■ OW0S8O. MICH. 
Strand (Last Half) — Dale A Boyle — The Intru- 
der — Three Ander Girls. - - 

POBTXAITD. ORE. _ 

Hippodrome (Pint . Half)— Harry WstMns— 

'Nixon A Banna — Angel A Fuller — SlngiDg Tare*; — 

Shrapnel Dodgers. (Last Half)— The Puppetta— 

Forarty A Footer — Stratford Comedy Four — Dan 

Abeam — Boss A Porter. 

SACSAafEBTO.- "at. 
. Hippodrome (First Halt)— Mabel Fonda Troope 
—Do Bone A Ellis — Sid Lewis — Murray A Fap- 
kora— Five Nigh tons. (Last Half)— BUIy Wolcaat 
— Becker A Adams — Rob White — Hawthorne Min- 
strels — Cornelia ft Wilbur. 

SEATTLE. WASH. 
Palace Hippodrome (First Half) — Three Har- 
mony Maids — Spanish Trio— Wright A Davis— Syl- 
via Mora A Co. — Women. (Last Hain.— Leslie A 
Monde — Ktmlws Boys — Fries A Wilson — "Girl 
from Starland"— "Where la My HatT" 

- - !" 8F0KAXE, WASH. - - 

Hippodrome (First Half)— Wright A Earl— 
Knowles A Hurst — Dena Cooper — Lee Berth. (Last 
Half) — Charles Ledegar — Ward A Howard — Violin 
Misses Grace Be Winters — Jack Hawkins A Co. 
.." TACOMA, WASH. 

Hippodrome - (First- Half) — 'The Poppets" 

Fogarty A Foster — Stratford Comedy Four — Dan 
Abeam — Boas -A Porter. (Last Half) — Three Har- 
mony Maids— Spanish Trio — Wright A Darl*— Syl- 
via Mora ft Co. — "W omen." 

VABCOTTVEB, B. C.- 
Colombia (lint Half)— Leslie A Monde— Klmiwa 
Boy* — Fries A Wilson— Girl from Starland — 



"Where Is My Hatr 
Lew Ward— Billy A Slna 
Troupe. 

WALLA WALLA. WASH. 
Liberty (First Half) — Marlon Munaon — HaU A 
Tyson-Jack A Jnne Laughlln — Lew Ward— BUIy 
A Sina - Crackles — Bills - Nowlan Troupe. (Laat 
Half)— Wright A Ear)— Dena Cooper— Knowlea' A 
ilnrst-l.ee Berth. 

CHICAGO, XXX. 
American (First Half) — Ward A Dooley— Homer 
A Dnbard — "On the Mlaalasippi"— Fltagerald A 
Carroll— Ben Benny— Byal A Early Berne. (Last 
Half) — Adams Trio — Sims ft Power* — Snapshots of 
1819— Girl In the Moon. 

(First' Half)— Lawton— Adam* Trie— 
A Power*— Snapshots of 1819— - Girl la the 
Moon. (Laat Half)— WHlard A Jnne* "On the 
■ Miss is sippi " — Ben Benny. 

Kadris (First Half)— Mabel .Whitman A Picks- 
Ward A Wilson— Maryland. Singer* Chaa. Okott 
— Plpifax A Accomplice. (Last Half )— Weber, 
Beck A Frascr — Golden Bird — Cantor's Mlnatrehr. 
ALTON, ILL. * 
Hippoa-r om s T "Melody Garten." (last Halt} — 
La France Bros.— Jenks A Alien. 

BVT.T.tf tf ll.T.r TT.T. 

Washington (First Half )— Kremka Bros— Jenks 
A'Allen — Bamaron A Sonla. (Last Half)— Kerr A 
Ensignr- Ward A W ilson — F reer. Baggett A Freer. 
.-' COLLIN SV II, T . T , ILL. 
Orpheam (Sunday only) — Four Johnsons— HaU A 
O'Brien. (First Half )— Cavana Dno — Stroud Trio. 
(Laat Half)— "Gin In the Basket"— WincheB A 
Greene. ' 

CHAMPAIGN. 
Orpheam (First Half) — Juggling D'Artno — Lee A 
Lawrence — The Golden Bird — Clayton A Lcnnle — 
Degnon A Clifton. (Second Half) — Kremka Bros. 
— Orren A Drew— Bight Vaaaar Girls— Davey 
JamJeson— Mabel Whitman A Picks. 
OBBAB RAPIDS. 
Majeatio (First Half)— Two Blondys— Pst A 
Peggy Houlton — Cabaret De Luxe. (Last Half)— 
Lucy Gillette A Co.— Taylor A Arnold— Jack Gard- 
ner A-Co.— Collins A Hart. - 

DECATTJB. 
Empress (First Bait)— Geo. A Mae Lefevr* 
Smith A Keefe — Burns A Wilson — Leona La Mar — 
Three Melvin Bros. (Last Half) — Joggling D'Armo 
— Lee A Lawrence — Berri A Jonanl — Leona La Mar 
— Degnon A CUfton. 

BATEHPOBT. 
Colemha (First Half)— Geo. ft Lilly Garden- 
Harper A Blanks — Geo. Lorett A Co. — Arthnr 
West A Co.— Lucy Gillette A Co. (Laat Half)— 
Harry Rose— Chaa. A Mad. Dunbar— "Little Plpl- 
- fax." Two to asa, 

XVAH8VXXXLY LTD. 
' Grand (First Half)— Bimbo A James— Chief 
Little Elk A Co.— 3urkbanlt A Boberts— Danny 
Simmons — "Flirtation." 

z. R. Loms. nx. ' . 

Erber'a (First Half )— WlncneB A Green— Gilbert 
A Saul— Pederson Broa. (Last Hslf)— Fred La 
Belne A Co.— Hugo Lotgena — Samaroff ft Sonla. 
ORAJUTE CITY, ELL. 
Washington (Sunday only) — Stroud Trio— Mar- 
celle Marlon, (first Half)— Time A Trie— Wansar 
A Palmer. (Last Half) — Two Knehns — Cavana 

Doo. t -- - - • 

GREEN BAT, WIS. 
Orpheam (Last Half Only) — Moran Sisters— Bert 
Lewis. .r ' 

MADISON. WIS. 
Orpheam (First Half) — Cantor's Minstrels — 
Suburbanites— Bert Lewis. (Last Half)— Salon 

. Singers. 

MOLUTE, tt.t. 
False* (FIrat Half) — Flake A FaHoo— TJame B. 
Raymond A Co. — James H. Cullen — Brown's High- 
landers. (Last Half)— Harher A Blanks — BrasilUan 
Heiress — Fred Lewis— Princess Kali ma A Co. 

MOXTJCPOSX), JXXn 

Palaoa (First Half )— Moran Slaters — Harry Boss 
— Dunbar** Salon Singer* — "Chas. A Mad. Dunbar 
—"Beginning of the World." (Laat Half)— Law- 
ton— Lizzie B. Raymond A Co.— Arthur West A 
Co. — Byal A Early Berne. 

BPBLBBTTELD, ' tt.t. 

Majeatio (First HUOr— Barry A Layton— Nana 
Sullivan A Co.— Brierre A King — Hugo Tart gens — 
De'tou. Mareena A Delton. (Last Half)— Marl - 
ette'a ManlVina Smith A Keefe— Burns A Wilson 
— Maryland Singers — James H. Cullen— Laaov* A 
Gilmore. 

.- SIOUX CTTY. IOWA. 

Orpheam (First Half )— Virginia Belles— Blossom 
Seeley A Co. — Jimmy Sara A Co. — Ergottl's Lilli- 
putians. (Tjest Half) — Ben A Hazel Mann— Follia 
A Leroy — Britt Wood — Frank Devoe A Co. — Blos- 
som Seeley A Co. — Lilllsn's Dog s. 
. ■ SOUTH BZBD. 

Orpheam (First Half)— Fulton ft Mack— Weber. 
Bccg A Fraxer. (Last Half)— Alsnsou— Welkins 
4 Williams Allen A Betty lAeber— Many Voelk — 
■That's Going 



ST. LOOTS, MO. 

Colombia (First Half)— "Little Jim" — Orren A 
Drew— Eight Vassar Girla— Neal Abel— La Franc* 
Bros. ' (Last Half) — Pederson- Bros.— Charlie Wil- 
son— Four Johnsons * . - 

Bialt* (First Bain— Foot Johnsons— Tna Knehns 
— Orth A Cody— Moran acaWIaer. (Laat Halt)— 
Nina 8uUlvan A Co.— StnYpaon A Dean— "Uttl* 
Jim" — Wanner A. Palmar Melody Garden. . 

Oread — Caro Bros. — Marcel SI srion— Harry Fat- 
teres— Francis A Phillip— Jeanette fTlllds Mlanls 
Stanley A Co. — Daisy Dugsa A Foor— Manning ft 
Hall— "New Leader." 

TKBBT! HAUTE, DID. 

Hippodrome (First Half)— Hector— -Chic A Tiny 
Harvey-rJohn Marston & Co. — Folsom A Brown — 
Nick Hufford— "Ob! Auntie." 

F. F. PROCTORS 
Week Sep*. 1-4 

MXW YOBjr. CTTY. 

Fifth Aranae— Anthony— J. ft M. Haikins— 

Boblna A Partner — Welllogtoo Cross Co Aileen 

Stanley— J. C. Mack Co. — Bnblnoff— Roland Travers 
Co. — Hugh Herbert— Barry Ulrle — Walters A Wal- 
ters—Frank Stafford Co. — Moran ft Mack— Four 
CUffords. 

Uth Street— Renn A Cunnlngnam— Paul ft M. 
Nolan— Maxwell Five— Arlington ft Leoue-rliack ft 
Earl— Scamp A 8camp— Fonr Cliffords— Bin Dooley 
— H, Harrington Co. — Dance Berne— Frank Conroy 
Co. — Tom McRae Go- — Gonne A Albert — Tate's 
Fishing. 

- CM Street— Dotaon— Jules A An. Garrison — Bach 
Bros.— Alex. Sparks — O'Connor ft Dixon— Blille 
Seaton — Mills A Loctwood— Marshall Montgomery — 
Suzanne ft Ernest — Saeltoa Brooks . Co. — Otto ft 

Sheridan— ekipper A Kaatrep. '■ 

Hsrlsm . Opera. Hsoae Saanlssi ft Farrell— Jim 

Lucas A Co. — Frank Stafford Co. — Arthnr Bill— 
Jackson Hiaea Co. — O'Coonor A Dtzoo— Karl BIcard 
—J. C. Mack— Chinese Jess Doo. 

Grand Opera House. — Fallon A Brown — " Melody 
of Youth" — Powers A Wallace — Rekoma— Torelil's 
Circus. 

ISSth Street— Weston A Vincent— Miss Eva Fay 
—Earl Rlcsrf — Mabel A J. Dove — Sabine A Good- 
wyn— Jaa. Lucss Co. — Anthony— Jules ft An. Gar- 
rison. 

81st 8treet— Am** ft WInthrop— Al Sbayne — Burt . 
Earl A Girls — HelenaGIeaaon — BUlIe Shaw Revue — 
Regal A Moore. m 

BT.' VXKNON, N. T. 

"Playmate*" — Barry Girls — Sbelton Brooks Co. — 
Braminoa — Ned Norworth Co. — Rainbow Cocktail — 
M. A M. Cleveland — A. Boblna Partner — Dunn Sis* 

ten Mis Ins 

veaeesa jr , y. 

BUI Dgoley— Mack A Earl— AJUme ft Malic— 
"Tate's Flahing*' — Plqno A Fellows — Dotaon — Renn 
ft Cunningham— Paul A M. Nolan— Alex. Sparks Co. 
—Mellette Sisters. 

■ BBCOKXYB, H. T. 

Prospect— M. A M, CTereUnd— Walters ft Wal- 
ters— Moran A Mack— M. A M. Dunn — Faher Bros. 
—Four Bolsee — Chinese Jaaa Trio — Ned Norworth ft 
Co. 

niaojiuiilal Tlaisiiiii Montgomery— Barbette — 

Otto A Shertdaa-3-Frank Mullane— Skipper A Kaa- 
trnp— JTIm A K- eFwssawJL 
Haisey — York's Dean — Mardo A Hnnter — Fred 

Wallace Co Jseqoes A Day— Smith A K sn fm s n — 

"New Doctor" — Too Bockarda — DeLyte Girls— H. 
Davenport Co. — Evans A Wilson — Phil Davis— Hen- 
dricks Bella Isle. 

ALBAJTY. ». Y. 

Samsted ft Marlon— Tabor A Groan— Begal A 
Jaack— vine Defy Co. — Primrsee Four — Or Ihsarn 
Troope— Valentin* A Bell— Three Kings "Many, 
sries"— McCarthy A Fays — Wilson Bros. — 81 1 Klrk- 
amlth Slaters. 

- ATJBTJsJT. H. T. 
Jackie A BiUle— Coakley A Dunlevy— Marian 
Weeks— Pearl Regay Co.— B. Waynsr: Beemao— 
Hamlin A Mack— Lucky A Harris— Ed. Janls A 

Girls. » 

ALLEBTOWB, PA. 
Two Earls— Bobby BandaU-^Edlth A Eddie 
Adair— Coada ft Verdi— Throe Twin*— Daly -ft Bar- 
low— Clark A La Vere — Emmett Devoy ft Co. — 

Frank Gabby. 

ALU GHENT. PA. 
V. 8. 8. Carols Trio— Wyatt'a Lads ft T s** 1*s - 
J. C. Morton ft Co.— Meredith ft Snooser— Pederson 
"Bros. • j " jsaszawT m » "™" 

•T. Fooler ft Pat*"— Henry A Mooro-^iV. May 
■Jt Co.— McAvoy A Wilson — Kelso A Leigh ton. 
CAMDEN, M. J. 
"Girl in Frame" — Keegan A Edwards — '"The 
" Cat"— Page ft Gray— The Decorators— Nip ft 
O'Brien — Sully A Hoogbton — The linaualaia Pue- 
msn Bros.— "The Beauty Vender." 
OHESTKB, FA. 
Dancing Dorisns— Solly A Houghton— Hat 8. 
Jerome Co. — Bowman Bro*. — "Beauty Vender" — 
"Glri In Frame" — Keegan A Edw ard s "The Cat" 
—Page A Gray — "The Deeorstors." 



(Tni» it not a Fate Pmdtr) 



Chorus Girls Wanted 



w 



52 Wiseks* engagement in New York City 

than the road 

Apply in person. 

Houston St, New York. Direction— Miruky Bro*). 



Much better 



Salary $20 per week. ^Mediums and ponies. 
National Win tergarden, 2nd Ave. and 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 



CLYDE J. 




SUM BUM 

Principal Comedian with Rube Bernstein 1 * "FOLLIES OF PLEASURE" 
My Seventh Season. Going Bigger and Better Than Ever 

STAR, BROOKLYN, THIS WEEK PLAZA, SPRINGFIELD, NEXT WEEK 



B. FV KAHN'S 

UNION SQUARE THEATRE 

^'BURLESQUE TALENTS 

MONEY NO OBJECT FOR RIGHT PEOPLE 

"The Best Is None Too Good" 

We get the money and are willing to spend it. Permanent New 
York City engagement. Road salaries for good Chorus Girls. Six 
days a weckv-no Sunday shows. 



PRIMA DONNA 



LUCILLE ROGERS 



BON TONS 



ERNEST MACK VERA HENNICI 



Eccentric Mnf«| mad Dancing 
Comedian 
WITH GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS 



Singing and Dancing Soobratta 
GROWN UP BABIES 

SEE ROEHM A RICHARDS 



FLORENCE DEVERE 



SOUBRETTE 



SWEETIE SWEETIE GIRLS 



THIS S PACE 
RESERVED BY 



LEWLEDERER 
KAHN'S UNION SQUARE 



PRIMA jt/| 

DONNA iVl 



IM I 



IVl 



IM 



LIBERTY 
GIRLS 



JUNE LcVEA Y *» GEORGE D. WIEST 



With 

SPORTING 
WIDOWS 



BARNEY 
GERARD 
PRESENTS 



EVELYN CUNNINGHAM 



FOLLIES OF THE DAY 

Direction 
ROEHM and RICHARDS 



TEXAS 
BEAUTY 



RUTH R 



LING 



'GLORMNA" 
GO. 



IVl 



WITH 
"GIRLS! GIRLS! GIRLS!" 



soubrette BABE DePALMER 



ROSE SYDELL 
COMPANY 



NOW 
APPEARING . 
WHERE? ; 

TRAMP 
ECCENTRIC 




AND 



OH A3 



AG AN 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



IVIYR 



CHERRY 



ROUND 

THE 

TOWN 



GIRLS 

ALA 

CARTE 



GIRLS 
GIRLS 
GIRLS 



DOING STRAIGHT 



WITH JACOBS AND JERMON'S BURLESQUE REVIEW 



SHIRLEY MALLETTE 



JOHN O. GRANT 

PERSONAL DIRECTION-CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



WITH PACEMAKERS 



MANACEMENT-HERK, KELLY * DAMSEL 



September^, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



SOD WILLIAMS HAS 
SPARED NO EXPENSE 
ON HIS NEW SHOW 

Sid Williams, when he staged bis "Girls 
Prom Joyland" this season, spared no ex- 
pense in equipping and costuming the show, 
is he sardy has as pretty a costume offer- 
ing and as good a production as one would 
care to see. • „ • 

Billy Gilbert Is again the featured comedian 
and wu seen last Thursday night at' the 
Star, Brooklyn, In big well known eccentric 
Dutch comedy character. To our way of 
thinking Gilbert la one of the fnnniest 
comedians on the circuit, bat bis performance 
the early part of the evening was not up to 
the Gilbert standard. There was something 
wrong with him. He did, however, find him- 
self down near the middle of the first part 
and from then on bad the audience in an 

aP Il Watson Is dolnir the second comedy. 
He is a fast little Hebrew comedian, but 
does not seem to have a chance to do very 
much. If given a little more opportunity, he 
might get more ont of the part. 

George Brennan, the "straight" man, was 
suffering from a cold the evening. we saw 
the show, which handicapped him in his 
work both In talking and when he sang. He 
worked hard, however, and gave a very good 
performance. His wardrobe is well kept and 
looks fine. He also has a good stage presence. 

Bert Keller Is the character man. He does 
a tough bit early in the performance and, 
later on. a Spanish, part. . Smiling Billle 
Davies, a big Kood natured prima donna with 
a voice of fine volume, repeated her success 
of last season. Miss Davies has a pleasing 
personality that extends away out over the 
footlights. She reads her lines well and does 
not take her work a bit seriously, a falling 
many other leading women have. Her cos- 
tumes are really attractive. 8he is a corking 
good burlesque woman. 

Ida Nicolia, who has returned to the com- 
panv after a season's absence in vaudeville 
again proved herself a clever character 
woman. Her portrayal of a deaf woman in 
the first part and her eccentric role In the 
burlesque' was exceptionally well done. 

Belle Younge Is the soubrette. This is her 
first senson ont of the chorus. She is a very 
prettv girl and has a good form. She has 
a wardrobe that considerable money has been 
spent on, but as a soubrette she is hardly 
there as yet. She has not the knack of 
putting over a number,, her voice la not very 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued tram psura IS) 



n 



^ 



strong and she lacks that dash and ginger 
that fo required for a girl to pnt over a good 
fast number. Another soubrette should be 
put with the show who can dance and put 
over a number and it will add greatly to this 
department. Let this little lady work In one 
or two numbers until she gets right, then 
make her a soubrette and there may ' be a 
different story to tell, .- __ . ,. 

Gilbert and Miaa NlcoUl did the deaf bit- 
cut down some and not drawn out. It went 
over nicely. The "Mary Mack" bit pleased 
the way Gilbert, Brennan and the Misses 
Davies, Nlcolal and Younge did it. 

The Introduction bit went over well with 
Gilbert, Brennan and Miss Davies In It. 

The first big laughing bit came along when 
Gilbert and Watson put over the drinking 
Dlt. Gilbert was very funny here and the 
scene went big. 

Another big scene was the "haunted cab- 
inet" which was in the show last season. Thi» 
scene Is Just one laugh after the other.. Gil- 
bert was most successful in it and his . ac- 
tions were very amusing. Watson wus also 
tnnny. but this is a Gilbert scene all- the 
way through. Brennan and the property 
nan were also In it- 

Miss Nlcolal's "Sweet Kisses" number 
ivas well Uked and she did sorely work hard 
in it. She got a lot of comedy out of it, 
Jilbert assisting her for laughs. ■ -:. 

Gilbert's burlesque dance pleased, and. ha a 
:he audience in laughter. 

X very pleasing looking chorus girl offered 
i graceful ■ dance Just before the finale- that 
cept the audience seated until It was finished. 

Williams has a good looking chorus and 
;hey work hard. They make up well and all 
ooked nice, SID. 

DAVE KRAUS HAS 
GOOD COMEDY SHOW; 
WILL PLEASE EVERYONE 

Dave Kraus' "Edmond Hays and His Own 
Show" was at the Olympic last week and 
played to an unusual large week's business 
for the warm weather wo Dad. The show Is 
in two parts, "The Piano Mover" and "The 
Wise Guy." Hayes bad practically the same 
show on the Columbia Circuit several seasons 
ago. He has made a few changes in it, how- 



ever, which has added to its value as an en- 
tertainment. 

Hayes, of course, has the star part, and, 
if anything, he la funnier than we nave ever 
seen him In the past. His character, which 
he alone Is the matter of. Is most amusing. 

Frank Uiley is the new Boso. He only 
broke into the part Monday night and Thurs- 
day afternoon he had the part down very 
well. If he keeps on improving, he will no 
■ doubt fill in the gap left 6y Snyder, the orig- 
inal Boso in a abort time. 

It seemed good to see Harry Hills back 
again In the ranks of .burlesque where he 
started many years ago. Hills Is a great 
straight man. He is one of tnoae fellows who 
knows how to "feed" a comedian for the 
proper results. He is a good talker and a 
neat dresser, and a great help to Hayes. 

Ida Emerson Is another favorite In bur- 
lesque of a few years ago, who has returned 
and Is a decided success In this show. Mlsa 
Emerson looks One, and reads lines just aa 
she did when we saw her last. Her wardrobe 
Is most attractive. 

' Delia. Clark is the prima donna and she 
was in exceptionally good voice when we 
caught the show. . She rendered all of her 
numbers acceptably. Her costumes are very 
pretty. 

Ruth Denlce, a shapely soubrette, had most 
of the numbers, and rendered them satisfac- 
torily. Her dresses are of pretty design and 
color. ■ 

Big Improvement ia seen in the work of 
Gertrude O'Connor over last season. Miss 
O'Connor has more to do now. That may be 
one of the reasons. She reads lines well and 
puts her numbers over nicely. She Is the 
ingenue, but she does a corkine good bit of 
character work as Mrs. Bozo. Her make' up 
and the way she costumed the part were well 
carried out, and it was very •odd. 

John MacKinnon is the juvenile and la one 
of those fellows that can play a character 
part as well. ' He takes care of several during 
the performance. As a juvenile be makes a 
favorable impression. He ia a neat dresser 
and has a corking good voice. 

Kraus has a fine looking cborus of shapely 
girls. In fact, it Is one or the best we have 
seen- so far this season. -The girls are great 
workers and do all in their power to put the 
numbers over. They sing well, are pretty, 
and, as a whole, are a real prize chorus. 
They are beautifully costumed. 

Raymond Midgeley staged the numbers. 



This is the first show we have seen that this 
roung producer haa put on and we might say 
-t Is a revelation in burlesque. He has 
staged some real novelty numbers that are 
different and away from the others, and they 
are fast. The scenery is very attractive and 
the Beta of a bright color effect. 

The Edmond Hayes Show Is a fine comedy 
offering with good principals, chorus and 
everything to make It good. There Is noth- 
ing to fear when the Censor Committee looks 
It over, aa it is a credit to the circuit. Sua. 



LEDERER LEAVING UNION SQ. 

Lew' Lederer. eccentric Dutch com- 
edian, has handed in bin two weeks' no- 
tice to close at the Union Square Theatre 
next Sautrday night He will go with a 
road show this season. 



EMPIRE SUNDAYS TO CONTINUE 

Sunday snows will be continued this sea- 
son at the Empire Theatre, Hoboken. The 
week will commence on Monday and close 
on Sunday, the same as last season. 



GOING INTO "CLORIANNA" 
Ruth Rolling closed with the Kabn 
Stock Company at the Union Square last 
Saturday night. She will commence re- 
hearsals with the "Glorianna" company 
this week. 



ANDY GARDNER RETURNS 

Andy Gardner, who returned to bur- 
lesque this season, after an absence of a 
number of years, opened at the Palace 
Theatre. Baltimore, with Barney Gerard's 
Girls de Looks last week. 



REPLACES DELLA BENNETT 

Hiil lie Mayne will replace Delia Ben- 
nett as prima donna of the "Burlesque 
Review" at Muiers, Bronx, next Monday. 



DINKINS CHANGES HIS MIND 

T. W. Dinkins has decided that he will 
not place a show on the National Bur- 
lesque Circuit this season. 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 

»»0O»OO»O»O>*»»wOwOO»»»OOtOOO»O»C»»t«w9 > »OO W >»>O>O>O»>»<w«»wOIIOOO»w»a<<>>T»O>» . <O»»»»O»COO»OOO>ll>>att i' 




RUBY THORNE and ANNA GOLDIE 

SOUBRETTE CRACKER JACKS CHARACTERS 



.JACK MUNDY 



DIRECTION— ARTHUR PEARSON 



ROSE EiVUVIETT 



RAGTIME INGENUE 



ROUND THE TOWN 



STRAIGHT 



WITH MAIDS OF AMERICA 



♦JAIME MAY 



SOUBRETTE 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



JULIA MORGAIM 

Tb. SouU. Tucker of Burlwqu*. F. W. CerhardV* MischM Makers, UIM. Tanks to Jo. Wilton 

ANNETTE SHAW 



PAULINE 

Ingenue 



ANDY 

Sin gins; ; 



CAMPBELL «wl DREW'S LIBERTY GIRLS 



JERRY LAWRENCE 



"Sky Scraper Lauda" 



LIBERTY GIRLS 



IVIOi>JT 



HEBREW COMEDIAN 



ROUND THE TOWN 1TO-2* 



GEO. CARROLL 

■" DOING TRAMP WITH THE JAZZ ■*.■««« 

BABE HEA LY 

Show-Sacoad Sanson with Barney Oass ' 



DANCING INGENUE 



LEW KELLY SHOW 



IN/I BACHEN 

DOING HUSH MANAGEMENT-IKE WEBER With Cfc— . RoMaaoa'a PariaUai Flirt. 

LETTIE 



INGENUE SOUBRETTE 



DIXON'S BIC REVIEW 



John MacKinnon 



JUVENILE— TENOR 



EDMOND HAYES* OWN SHOW 



SOUBRETTE 



RUBE BERNSTEIN'S FOLLIES OF PLEASURE 



MARGUERITE WELCH 



■ win 



PRIMA DONNA WITH THE VOICE 

ad Rlr n i SB. Sana* Th-.tr. RU* New Yarn 



JEW AND DUTCH 



OPEN FOR BURLESQUE NEXT SEASON 



BABE WELLINGTON 



IRRESISTIBLE BUNCH OF NERVES 



SOUBRETTE-NATIONAL WINTXRGARDEN 



WM. F. (Billy) HARMS THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 

HOBOKEN. N. J. (Mrartir of T. B. C) 

FLORENCE WHITFORD 

SOUBRETTE JAZZ BABBIES 

ANNETTE LA ROCHELLE 



PRIMA DONNA 



RUBE BERNSTEIN'S FOLLIES OF PLEASURE 



28 






r'-C-ii.W-.-v.-**.. ■ . *~ 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



.-",>.%.-*: - ^jmp'A fljSfiiS; 



September 3, 1919 



••-'r S^^'^t:^^ - : ^-■--■^. -----:• ^ . 






^,'.'^'"--''- ' 







- Organized August 23, 1919 

Headquarters, 122 W. 43d St., New York City. Telephone, Bryant 5934 

OFFICERS: 
GEORGE M. COHAN - President ALLAN DINEHART - Secretary 
LOUIS MANN - - Vice-President WILLIAM COLLIER - Treasurer 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 



MARGARET ANGLIN 
ARTHURASHLEY 
FAY BAINTER 
GEORGE BARNUM 
JANET BEECHER 



HOLBROOK BLINN 
MRS.FISKE 

w. h: gilmore 

JOHNHALIJDAY 
GLADYS HANSON 



FREDERICK KARR 
LESTER LONERGAN 
GEORGE MAC FARLANE 
WnXARDMACK 
JOSE RUBIN 



ZELDA SEARS 
LOWELL SHERMAN 
OTIS SKINNER 
LENOREULRIC 
DAVID WARFffiLD 
MARJORffi WOOD 



The League is a strictly INDEPENDENT organization of actors, who believe that an equitable co-operative spirit should 
prevail in the theatre, and it aims to re-establish and maintain friendly relations between actors and managers. Before resigning 
from the Producing. Managers' Association to accept the presidency of the League, Mr. Cohan obtained from the managers the 
adoption of an improved form of the STANDARD CONTRACT containing-these features: 

Eight performances shall constitute a week, and proportionate payment is to be made for all per- 
formances over this number. • ' 

There shall be four weeks of free rehearsals for dramatic productions,, and full salaries are to be ' ';■'•' 

paid for all over that time. 

There shall be five weeks of free rehearsals for musical productions, with full pay thereafter. •'•:. .'!;,";._. . „ 

. . ■ , • This applies' to chorus as well as principals. '■' • - 

All costumes, including shoes and stockings, to be furnished for chorus people by the producers. 
-'' ■- ■■.•'. -All gowns to be supplied by the producers. ... ... '■•'v'.-J. ... 

• : - Salaries to be paid not later than Saturday nights. . ":. •-, '"•,••' • 

:/! _ .. " ■].-.. • If a play is rehearsed ten days, and then abandoned, one week's. salary is to be paid. ..'-;" "";■''; 

- ..'. :.. vj f :'■;?. :■ ■'■■■ ■■'. .. After the present season full Salaries are to be paid for Holy Week and the week before Christ- Wii%^^f£s$ffi&&&s'--.-- 

-"" mas", whether or not the actor is required to play. During the coming season salaries will be paid when. j •.';.,/..• ^ -■■>■»,.! . 

.•'.;'''. '* companies play. ..- •":.•• /"-■•:: .'-'."- '■ '■ ''~ : ' j '•■'. ■'■■ ? -i •'• 

.-'The Producing Managers' Association is willing to agree to'a satisfactory method of arbitration by which the actor shall be 
guaranteed enforcement of contracts. "/ . - ^ ' - • 

"- -To further substantiate this the Producing Managers' Association have bonded themselves to fulfill all contracts, and the 
Association in turn agrees to insist upon the terms of the contract being lived up to by individual members.' 

In one week the League has enrolled a. membership of 2,500. It is growing daily. All persons having been employed for 
twenty-six weeks or more on the professional stage, in individual or COLLECTIVE acting, are eligible to membership. No 
initiation fee! Dues only $5.00 per year. Apply at Headquarters in person or fill out and maiLthis coupon, accompanied .by : J- 
remittance. «*'"* . ■•- --■•■ . ' '*. ■•'--. '■.."'-' :•;'■■";"-#' .'.' ' 'r>- Ss^'/i 



■♦jisiH 



fe?* 





APPLICATION 






:i I wish to join the Actors' Fidelity League, and herewith enclose $5 for'.^ 


... 




annual dues. My indorser is .- '*. ' . ,^. £\ v.-...,ii;- 




f* "". ' «~ . *' , . 




: r j ; 




Permanent address* ••«.,«•:■••••••••• •'•• • *.* •„•-•-•••"• *.s* •>•-?.•'•;.••••*• • •^i-^> 

"..•■ .-. •■ ,-j'v- .- • • • '.-;'.' "^v*.-;-- '■". .''V- i 1 ■ ■•• - : "- i> ■ > '"-? • 






^eKWill not stand for the breaching of contracts.- We believe in individual freedom, consistent with justice^' 
'We secure, maintain and protect the actor's rights. Members serving in an advisory: capacity are: ,:^./£J^. :.,;; 



JOLlArARTHUR 
BLANCHE BATES 
NORABAYES 
AMELIA BINGHAM 
L IONE L BRAHAM 
RUTH CHESTER 
INA CLAHIE 
PATRICIA COLLINGE 



BESSIE M!COY DAVIS 
EUGENE COWLES 
QLlVEWYNDHAM 

donald gallagher 
ralph herz 
ben johnson 
justwe Johnstone 



HOWARD KYLE : ^ 
ALEXANDER LEFTWICH 
MAURICE 
BURRMTNTOSH 
CLi^.LlPMAN|.: 'f : ^ lL 
HENRYMBLLER > Jr 
FJMJRENCE NASH ^ 



aKt-ci ., 



MARY/NASH 
ISFF^QWiM PINTO 
MARYRYAN 
MARGARET ST. JOHN 
FRANK K. SMTTHSON 
FRANCES.STARR 
VALIJVALLL 






**y-7. .■: ■ 



I 



September 3, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



TWO UNIONS HANDLE ACTORS' STRIKE 



but left In the company of Francis Conlon, 

Basil 81rattrl, who plays the' oart of 

"Sdpic" In "Somebody's Sweetheart" at toe 

simbcrt, walked out, followed by musicians 

nnd stage hands. ' ■ v.^... . _. 

At the Plymouth four members of tho 

' -Breakfast in Bed" east quit at the last min- 
ute stopping the production In the .middle; 
of the oTOture.bythe'^ffihestra. TheVweT*- 
will Demur, C. Hooper frank, Harry Ham 

*Hn. and Wlado Whipple. 

i itaymond Hitchcock "beat them to It" at 

I the Colonial and "went on strike," aa he say a. 
when six members of the "Hitchey Koo 1»1«" 
cast laid aside their paint sticks and wlgy. . 
Donald Brian, Peggy Wood, and Walace 
Eddlnger, co-stars andowners ofaeYenty per 
cent of the Selwyn production, "Buddies," at 

the Park Square Theatre, did not strike, but 
twelve members of the cast walked out. Clos- 
ing the house. 

The strike was all done -very quietly. An- 
nouncement from the Tarloua stages that, 
owing to the strike there would be no per- 
formance, was followed by the audiences fil- 
ing out to the box offices and exchanging 
their seat checks for cash. _■ '_' 

It Is estimated that the strike cost the the- 
atres fully $25,000 today with $100,000 the 
likely loss, should it continue for a week. 

The threat of injunction kept more mem- 
bers from striking, but the action of thirty- 
one Equity members was enough to force the 
closing of the six theatres. 

Tbere were ITS .actors and actresses In 
the six productions who did not walk out, 
but the strike of musicians and stage hands 
made the giving of the shows an impossibil- 
ity. It is charged by the theatre managers 
that the Carroll girl was virtually kidnapped 
at the Tremont by a member of the actors' 
union. Miss Carroll is now In hiding. 

Charles A. Bird, general manager for F. 
Ray Comstock, and William Elliott will start 
suit for $100,000 against Hal Porde^ of the 
"Oh Sly Bear' Company. Forde la the Bos- 
ton representative of the Actors' Equity As- 
sociation. ' . . : 

At the hearing, earlier In the week on A. 
II. Woods' suit to enjoin his actors from 
striking, Fred W. Stron, one of the members 
of the "Breakfast In Bed" company, testified 
that Frank Gllmore bad offered him two 
weeks' salary to break hta contract with 
Woods. " •' 

Mr. Savage said that If the actors per- 
sisted in doing business upon a union basis 
It would-be Impossible for him to continue 
- as a producer. 

"The business," he said, "is hazardous 
enough as It 1b, without bringing into it the 
element of unionism. It would be Impossible 
for producers . to continue If they did not 
know what minute a strike might he called, 
perhaps *a few hours ' before a production 
which had cost a lot of money was to open. 

"The actors do not realize what this union 
business means. Road companies would be up 
against the proposition of joining in sym- 
pathetic strikes In every city they played. It . 
would be Impossible to deal with actors as 
with other classes. A contractor knows that 
he can employ so many bricklayers at $6 a 
day, but what would happen If I asked the 
Equity Association to send me ten S200 lead- 
ins men ? Producers do business with actors 
as Individuals and should be allowed to con- 
tinue on that basis." 

UNION TO FIGHT DECISION 

Atlantic City, N. J., Sept. 1. — Conditions 
here remain unchanged except that Vice- 
chancellor John H. Backea has ordered the 
officers of Local No. 77, I. A. T. S. E., to 
cause why they should not be punished 
for contempt. They are alleged to have vio- 
lated an Injunction restraining the officers 
and members' of the organization from in- 
fluencing, their members to. strike when the 
"Listen Xester" show arrived here. 

The anti-strike Injunction Issued by Vice- 
Chancellor Bnekes was among the first of its 
kind in the country and will be challenged 
by the atagemen's counsel on ' the grounds 
that the court has no right to. anticipate 
strikes nor to compel men to work. 

WALK .OUT IN BALTIMORE 

Baltimobsv Sept. 1. — Although musicians 
and stage hands refused to work with the 
non-equity members of John Cort's musical 
comedy ''Listen Lester" when It opened here 
at the Ford Opera House tonight, a reserve 
force was on hand and the curtain rose at 
the scheduled time. The stage hands and 
musicians will remain out all week and an- 
nounce that they will Btay out longer If an- 
other show composed of members who are not 
affiliated with the Actors' Equity Association 
follows the "Listen Lester" Company. This 
is the first time Baltimore has felt the affects 
of the actors' strike. 



WASHINGTON HIT ALSO 

„W*8HrKOTOK, I>. C, Aug. 81.— "Fifty 
Fifty, Ltd.," which was to have opened to- 
night, found it impossible to do so, owing to 

the actors' strike. 

A performance last week of John D. Will- 
iam's production. "Dp From Nowhere." by 
Hnrry Leon Wilson and Booth Tarklngton, 
was attended by everyone except the stage 
hands and musicians, so that the shew was 
forced to close, and the Shnbert-Belasco The- 
atre here la dark, as a consequence. 



PHILADELPHIA HOUSES CLOSE 

Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 81. — As a result 
of the strike In New York, Philadelphia has 
delayed the opening of Its theatrical season. 
The Gurries Theatre, which was to show "La, 
La Lucille" and the> AdelphU Theatre, with 
. "Toby> Bow*V«s the attraction, closed their 
"advance sale' '-of seafa: withdrew advertlne- 
• menra and ar* refunding money on tickets 
that had already been sold. It la hot ex- 
pected to open these houses with any legiti- 
mate attraction until' the strike ia settled. 

The Academy Theatre has been leased by 
the Equity and will open about September 
with a musical comedy. 

Thursday 

"Happy Days" changed to "Dark Days" 
when the Hippodrome suddenly shut down 
on Thursday night and 412 stagehands went 
on strike. Nearly 6,000 persons were turned 
away and told to call at the box office later 
to bare their ticket money refunded. 

The dosing of the house came aa a great 
surprise presumably to both the Hippodrome 
management and the Equity, although it was 
Intimated in last week's Clipper that a strike 
at the Hippodrome was by no means unlikely. 
Grant Steward, secretary of the Equity, said, 
on Thursday night, that the strike was "news 
to him," while the Hip officials claimed that 
they had no Intimation that there was to be 
a strike until the stage hands failed to punch 
in on the time clock for the evening per- 
formance. 

In the Hippodrome company were eighty- 
two principals, 204 chorus people, 180 ballet 
girls, ninety-four specialty artists and clowns, 
sixty-nine swimmers and divers, twelve riders, 
forty-four animal trainers, and attendants, 
forty-two musicians, four hundred and twelve 
stagehands and 193 members of the house 
staff. 

No one would ever have thought that the 
hundreds of men In faultless full dress and 
an equal number of ladles, unsurpassed In 
beauty, dress and grace, who attended a ball 
and supper at the Hotel Aster on Thursday 
night,. were unionists on strike. Bather, the 
affair resembled an assemblage of Manhat- 
tan's elite, and It was not until the midnight 
grand march that the affair suggested the 
stage In the slightest. At this Juncture, Ethel 
Barrymore and Francis Wilson led a march 
as picturesque aa has ever been seen in the 
Astor ballroom followed by several hundred 
theatrical lights and a representation of 
chorus girls. In costume, from the different 
musical plays that are now on strike. 

After the march, a abort cabaret program 
was rendered, with Marie Dressler's girls and 
boys featured In a number of songs directed 
at the managers. The songs were sung by 
Roger Gray, while the chorus furnished a 
snappy and colorful background. 

Supper followed in the Astor dining roem. 

The ball was attended by almost 1,000 per- 
sons, and tickets were sold for $10 each. 
Boxea were purchased for $100 each, and 
among the boxbolders were Mrs. Felix Morris, 
Fred Stone, Molly King, William Farnum, 
Elsie Ferguson, Dianthe Patterson, Blanche 
Ring, John Emerson, Anita Loos, Ernest Glen- 
dennlng, Marie Dressier. Norma Talmadge, 
Arthur Cushman, Walker, Whiteside, Ida 
Muello and Louis Huff. - 

Proceeds will be turned Into the Equity 
treasury for the relief fund. Those on the 
Ball Committee were Hassan! Short, chair- 
man; Ralph Morgan, vice-chairman; Gilbert 
Douglas, secretary ; Edward Douglas, assis- 
tant secretary. 

A -committee of ushers included Marion 

Coakley, Sue McManamie, Mrs. Edward Ellis, 
Lillian Tucker, Kdlth .King, Ethel Intropodi, 
Ernest Glendennlng, Otto Kroger, Percy Hel- 
ton, Lyn Overman, Beaufort Hampden, 
Richard Sterling, George Le Guerre, Major 
Reginald Barlow, and Reginald Mason. 

The theatrical billposters strengthened the 
cause of the strikers on Thursday when, 
through William McCarthy, secretary of their 
union, they declared that they would post 
no more bills In New York City for the 
theatres that are against the Equity until 
the strike -is over. 

Hugh Frayne, of the A. F. of L. announced 
that 500 motion picture players had formed 
a union, and that the A. F. of L. has granted 
a charter for a national cinema actors' or- 
ganization • .... 

Friday .J 

It had been Intimated on several occasions 
by. persons connected with the managerial end 
of the fracas that when Gompers returned 
from Europe the complexion of things would 
materially change, because the labor leader la 
a -personal friend of several of the- managers. 
His statement upon his arrival regarding the 
situation seemed to belle this intimation, but, 
- undaunted, -George Cohan and Arthur Hop- 
kins made a trip to Washington late last week 
to lay their case before the president of the 
American Federation of Labor, only to learn 
that Gompers maintained bis stand with the 
striking actors. 

' A copy . of a statement explaining ' the 
(Continued on page 80) 




(This it met a Fact Powdtr) 




YOUR PHOTOGRAPH 
ON A BUTTON 

Grn it to tout Meads— 
ok It tor sdnrtfedBf, lay 
pbotompb or phrase.- Photos 
retrod uninjured- 100 
celluloid buttons «tth ptn, 
S5.no; 500. $15; 1,000, 

125. SUOPS Or DOOry 

BfW. lAttfi CO., lit 

N. Y. C. 



EM1VIA KRAUSE 



S HONEY GIRLS 

.Lfc. DHtKCnON-JACX FLYNN ' * 



JIMMY CASSON 



The AMERICAN ACE of SONG, 
with FRED KLEM at the PIANO 



;« SICKELMORE LE MESSURIER 

In "Studio Fancies" 



HUBERT KINNEY ft CORINNE 

Singing and Dan cing — Direction Rosalia Stswart 



AL 



MYRTLE 



MARDO & LORENZ 



Tho Wop and Tha Girl 



In VancWviOo 



3 JENNETT 

VAUDEVILLE'S PRETTIEST OFFERING Df VAUDEVILLE 

SMILXTTA SISTERS 

NOVELTY DE LUXE IN VAUDEVILLE 

MILDRED ROGERS 

The Dainty Miss in 5 Feet of Dancing 

DUtECTIOW-ASE FUNUXG 



NELLIE MOORE 

IN JAZZ LAND Ditwctian— GEO. SOFRANSEI 

^COLLINS & DUNBAR""' 

A Dainty Sons; and Pane* Offering Always Woriana;. W— team Rep„ Law CoMb«*» 



WILLIAM CONWAY 



THE IRISH PIANIST— tN VAUDEVILLE 



Th* Littl* MtfMt in Vaadarulo 



GEORGE 



ROOEED SOLID— LOEWS CIRCUIT 



DHL. TOM JONES 



MERRILEES £22 DORIA 



GEMS OF SONG AND OPERA 



ED and EDNA FANTON 



fa a, dainty ainial oddity. Dir. 



E D INI A 

DIRECTION— LEW LESLIE 



Df VAUDEVILLE. 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 




ALBOLENE 

%e safe ^9> 
make-up 
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A QUICK descent of the final cnr. 
■**■ tain— then ALBOLENE — end the 

make-up disappears in no time. Your 
akin is kept in splendid condition by 
this pure, agreeable make-up remover, 
the favorite of the stage for years. 
For the make-up box 1 and 2 ounce 
tabes. Also in % and 1 lb. cans. 

ALBOLENE is sold by any druggist! ur 

dealers in make-up. Free sample on 

request. 



McKESSON&ROBBINS 




Manuf actoring CbeasJsta 

Bat. 1833 * 

91 Fulton Street, New York 



BASE BALL 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

POLO GROUNDS 



Sept. 3 with Boston 
Sept. 4-6 with Brooklyn 




Jewekd Platinum Finished Bar Pin 



Jsattwnd yoar bum md address — Ko Moawy— w» 
wrfll wend chia atyliah platinum a^Hr" 1 bar pin to 
yon. TbB pin it copied from a genuine plaefnam and 
diaaaood which cost £30.00. Yoa or roar triads can 
not tan tha n mm aaod roo for tiM from U» SB 
ajL Bat with la iparkiins jewels. Length, r '- 
Worn by fashions ha. women nuraucn. 

Causa] Ha linnov ■ Jost To™' nc ^ a tod tddraaj. 

AetlD HO BiOney When the peatman deUrera 



tbe pin to roar door, pay bra fc.S8 orI». II It does 
ajatDMaa roo In .vary var. return it and n will 
raftmd roar money it ooca. Orderby Numbed*. 

Walter Field Co. „,. -T* D - ,M 



Catering to the Profession 

FERDINAND 
BLOCK 

- Attorney at Law 

II 12-14 Chsatnut Street 
PhiUcWphi. 

of the 



MADISON'S BUDGET No. 17 

containa a liberal usortsaent of Jaaaas | 
Madison's latest sure-fire mew 
parodies, acta for tare and mora : 
era. minatrel firat parts, 300 ail 
tabloid farce, etc Price ONE 
Se-ad orders to JAMES MADISON, 
VSt Aaaaaaay Hew York. 

EDEE Catalog- of Professional and Amateur 

ftlf f Plays, Sketches, Monologs, Minstrel 

"■■ Jokes, Recitations, Make up Goods, etc. 

Fitxrarald PubUaniac Corporation, U Veaay St, 

Dept. D. New York 



managerial attitude, aa explained to Gompers, 
was given to the presa by the P. M. A. pub- 
licity department and reads as follows : 

"The present acton' strike la neither 
founded on demands for Increased pay nor 
decreased hoars. Acton are conceded to be 
among the* higher paid people in the world.' 
Their boors are shorter than those required 
of the employes of any jotberp business. 

"Since Increased pay and decreased boon 
are the primary Inducing cansea for the 
formation of unions and affiliations with 
other unions, it Is evident that the actor Is 
a stranger to the fundamental needs of 
unionism, -n 

"Prom the standpoint of the employer the 
hardships of anion Ism are the closed shop 
and the strike. The actors agree that the 
closed shop would be a serious detriment 
to the theatre, and hare publicly declared 
that they would not seek its enforcement. 
That brings us to the strike, and that we 
have with ns. Why the strike? 

"Falling to secure from the managers a 
satisfactory form of contract, the Actors' 
Equity Association affiliated with the White 
Bats of America, which In turn was affiliated 
with the American Federation of Labor. 

"The move was as fatal tor the future of 
the actor and the theatre as could have been 
conceived. In an Instant" the actor's liberty 
was gone., his right to make individual con- 
tract thar could not be -disturbed - was 
stripped from him, and he was placed im- 
mediately under probable obligations to vari- 
ous other branches of labor. 

"The Actors' Kquity Asosdation at once 
became a third party to the contract between 
actor and. manager and the determining 
party, since at a moment's notice It could 
brush aside the contract and sever com- 
pletely the relations between actor. and mana- 
ger, no matter how happy those relations 
might be. . 

"A condition like this can only mean chaos 
and finally death to the thatre. The entire 
producing business is built on individual con- 
tract between actor and manager. Produc- 
tions are planned far ahead with certain 
actors in mind. Frequently productions are 
long postponed until such time as certain 
acton are free;— The manager believes—that 
the success of such productions is made 'more 
certain by . the help of these actors, ' and, 
naturally, if success follows, the manager 
wants to feel certain of the services of these 
actors for a denr.lte period. 

"The actor, before he can honestly enter 
into a ocntracf for such certain period, must 
know that no Influence that can Interfere 
with his fulfillment of that contract- can pos- 
sibly arise. He cannot' serve two masters, 
the- theatre and unionism. - If he la true to 
the honorable obligations of unionism, he has 
no right to make any definite personal con- 
tract for the theatre. His duty to unionism 
may at any time upset it. ' 

"Unionism was misrepresented to the actor 
by the Equity leaders. He was told that It 
imposed no obligation upon him ; that he 
could use it to get what he wanted, and' it 
would never make demands on him. He was 
getting into unionism on a pass. He be- 
lieved it. 

"Then came the strike, agreed to by the 
actors in a moment of hysteria. Again the 
actors were deceived by their leaden. They 
were told they had a right to strike — that ' 
their contracts had been broken "by the man- 
agers. 

"When the case reached the courts the 
acton* advisors had no defense to offer. The 
court held that the managers had not vio- 
lated their contracts, bnt the acton had, and 
were personally liable. 

"In the meantime the stage hands and the 
musicians declared a sympathetic strike. 
The intelligent actors began to see their pre- 
dicament. They were being bound closer and 
closer to their affiliations. Tbejr were under 
obligations to them. Then the bill-posters 
displayed their sympathy. 

"Then control of the strike began to slip 
from Acton' Equity hands. The stage hands 
and musicians took charge. They closed 
theatres that the Acton' Equity Association 
bad promised protection. The Actors* Equity 
Association was being bowled over by its own 
machine. 

"Now where does the actor stand in his 
ability to fulfill contracts? By honor he la 
bound to the call of at least four agencies. 
In a contract with -a manager now, he would 
be a party of the sixth part, with the Actors' 
Equity Association second part, stage hands 
third part, musicians fourth part, bill posters 
fifth part. If he can satisfy the other four 
parts, he may fulfill his contract. 

"And with, himself thus helplessly en- 

WANTED 

Violinist and ■ Pianist with motion picture 
experience. Good pay. Steady work. Quack 
players stay off. IRVING THEATRE, Myrtle 
and IrTtaur Arcs*, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



5 FV 17 E La-teat 

I TRisl. Issue of 

I HOW TO MAKE-UP 




Ifrift or Call 

M. Stein Cosmette Co. 

«20 Wast 31st Street, New York 



JUST OUT 

BULLETIN 1W -* 

Price, On* Dollar Par Copy. 

CI aa title collection of 138 pasts of Be*, brirht and 
orixinal noderliis comedy juterlli, emiffidnf. 
ereryujlnt that can be of on to tha performer, do 
nutter »bat sort of an act, monolocue, parody or 
ffll-io Mta be may require. HohrlthstsniHm that 
McNalir'a Bulletin No. S is hinjw Id qointHy tad 
tetter la quality than era before the price reaudla 
as always, one dollar per copy. 
■clAUY'S BUUETIB He 5 cootalm the follow- 
ing «ut-edee. op-to-data comedy material: 
18 SCIEaaitlG ■0K0106UES. Etch on. a 

pantile ML 
14 HMIIIIS ACTS for two miles. Each set sa 

applause winner. 

11 •BI6IBAL ACTS for male sad female. They'll 
maJrt eood on any Mil. 

40 SURE-FIRE PARODIES on all of Broadway's 
latest sons bits. 

A BOOF-LIFTIRG Til* ACT. This act Is s 24 

Karat, sare-flro hit. 
A BATTLING 8.UARTETTE ACT. Tab set Is sllre 

with humor of the rib-tjeilint; load. 
A* ACT FOR TWO FEMALES. This set will 

posiliTcly make eood. 
A TEW COMEDY SKETCH entitled "The Han 

Tamer." It's a seresra. • ■ 

A GREAT BURLESQUE entitled "TankM Doodle." 

It's brtcht. breezy and babbles oter with wiL 

12 MINSTREL FIRST- PARTS with atde-splitUnf 
' Jokes and bet-shot cross Ore no. 

CRASD ■INSTIEL FINALE enuued "At the Cir- 
rus." Fall of lattfhs. 

HUNDREOS of enss-nro jokes tor tide-walk con- 
versation Tor two miles tad male tad female. 

BESIDES other comedy material which la useful 
to the TaaderlUe performer. 
Bemember the price of HckALLY'S BULLETIN 

NO. 5 If only one dollar per copy; or will send 

you BULLETINS Not. 3. 4 ul 5 far 52.00. vita 

money back guarantee.. 

WM. McNALLY 



81 East USth Stmt 



New York 



BERT LEVEY 
CIRCUIT 

VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

Alcasmr Theatre Building. 
. SAN FRANCISCO 



WANTED An Engagement 

by 2 high-class Musicians, (Pianist and Violin- 
ist/ as director of orchestra or band. Com- 
poser and arranger. Now summering in 
mountains. Apply H. F. MOORE, Vernal, 
Utah. 



Attractions at Theatres 



B. X. KEITH'S 

PALACE 



CHARLES XING A 
GIRLS. TED LEWIS, 
GOULD A LEWIS, GAL- 
LAGHXR A R0LLEY, 

rtroactway a «Tth St. 

Mat. Daily at 2 P. M. . BHENDEL A BEST, ato- 
23, 00 and TBe. HAHOhT A DIAMOND, 

■vary Night 

29, B0, TO", Ha 81.50 TtTTTm a tuc k UK 

OLYMPIC «£r s *fe.A« 

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SPORT GIRLS 

Next Week— PARISIAN FLIRTS 



BROOKLYN THEATRES 



Jay nr. Fulton St. 
Tel. Main 1893 



Mat. 
Dally 



FOLLIES OF PLEASURE 

Next Week — SWEET SWEETIE. GIRLS 



STEP LIVELY GIRLS 

Next Week— MAIDS OF AMERICA 

EMPIRE THEATRE 

Ralph Avenue, and P i u a d i sy 

THIS WEEK 

SIGHT SEERS 

Next Week— OH GIRLS! 



tangled, he asks why the managers does not 
recognize him. . The greatest Injustice the 
manager could inflict upon the theatre and 
the actor,, would be approval of the actor's 
present predicament. A nominally uncertain 
business would become so helplessly hazard- 
ous that no man who regarded slight secur- 
ity, as essential could venture into it. 

"The business might easily be exposed to 
a series of strikes. The lesson of the present 
strike is enough to demonstrate that two or 
three more of them, wonld ruin the tneatrical 
business and reduce It to the lowest vitality 
It has known since its Infancy. 

"The substitution of new managements or 
actor-mnnagements would in no way alleviate 
the situation, since they in turn would lie 
ever subject to the same conditions which the 
present managers believe would make theatre 
operation and play production too hazardous 
to be longer attractive. 

- "Even those managers who persisted under 
these conditions would' necessarily confine 
their activities to a few productions, which 
were in the first place comparatively small In 
initial risk, and possible of easy operative 
cost. 

"This In turn would automatically throw 
hundreds of actors out "of work, as well as 
stage hands and musicians. So the final up- 
shot Is a great diminishing of the theatre 
itself, a hardship to all. actors whether en- 
gaged or not, a great depletion in the ranks 
of the already unionized portion of the thea- 
tre, and the reduction of the producer to an 
occasional dabbler in insignificant efforts. 
Ail vitality would be gone. It would be the 
stage enchainetr. 

"The Equity officials have repeatedly 
claimed that the mnnagera were fight- 
ing the American Federation of Labor. 
The charge is either stupid or malicious. 
The managers have worker in perfect har- 
mony for the past twenty years with the 
Federation of Labor, and are scarcely seeking 
a quarrel now. But tbe managera do believe 
that the actor has no place in the Federation 
of Labor, and that tbe relationship can only 
work great harship on all concerned.*' 
The managers have worked In perfect bar- 




{Thit is not a Face Powder) 



PLAYS 



Sketches 

ALICE HOWL AND, 3SSI N. 
KccbcM> Ave., Chicago. 



PUBLISHERS, ATTENTION 

"Lulu from Honolulo," "When It's Apple Picking 
J* m i*-r , IT lr * ! 1? ,a B lne»." "Little Dusky Babe. 
Goodnight," •'Close Your Eyelids, Honey," "Watt- 
HKi wl!1 •*" for cash or on royalty. BELA B. 
HALDERatAaT, c/o Reporter. Franklin Grove, HI. 




Keep Yourself 
In the Public Eye 

You know the value of publicity to a 
"professional." 

Use these photo stamps freely, and make 
your face familiar to the managers. Uncle 
Sam will get them past a score of office 
bors while you are talking to one. 

The cost is trifling. You can have 

100 Foto Stamps 
for $1.50 

-You'll find scores of other uses for them, 
too, on your personal letters and cards. 

Send your favorite photograph for repro- 
duction. It will be returned in perfect con- 
dition . TEN DAYS must be allowed for 
finishing. 

500— $6.00. 1,000— $10.00. 10,000 or more— 
$6.50 Per Thousand. 

Send Stamps or Money OrcVr 

BENJAMIN HARRIS CO., Inc. 

229 Bo werry New York 



AX LIBERTY . _ 

Plasbt saw VlHlltt, couple, pianist, also Onanist. Urea 
Library Moving Picture experience. Can fnrnllh dramm** 
with belli, etc. - HEBBY H. 6AWEBS, a/a Tit Nrw York 
Cllaaw. 




PLAYS, SKET CHES 
^WRITTEN' 

TERMS for a stamp 

E. L. GAMBLE, PLAYWRIGHT 
East Liverpool, Ohio 



September 3, 1919 



THE NEW YORK- CLIPPER 



31 




DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Route* Mutt Reach This Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

"At 9 :*5" — Playhouse, New York, lndef. . 
•■Angel Face" — Colonial. Chicago. (Closed 

by strike.) 
"Better "Ole"— Mr. and Mrs. Coburn— Booth, 

New York City. (Close by strike.) 
"Buddies" — Park So... Boston, Mass., lndef. 
"Breakfast in Bed" — Plymouth, Boston, lndef. 
"Cappy Kicks" — Cort, Chicago, 111. (Closed by 

"Chu Chin Chow" — Century, New Tork. 

(Closed by strike.) 
"The Challenge" — Selwyn, New Tork City. 

(Closed by strike.) 
"Crimson Alibi" — Broadhurst, New Tork. 

(Closed by strike.) 
Carmelo's Ted. Musical Comedy Co. — Rex, 

Omaha, Neb., lndef. 
"East Is West"— Astorv New York City. 

(Closed by strike.) 
"Five Million, The" — Lyric, New York City, 

lndef. (Closed by actors' strike.) 
Greenwich Village Follies — Greenwich Village, 

N. Y., lndef. 
"Gaieties of 1018" — *4th St, New York City. 

(Closed by actors' strike.) 
"Fifty-Fifty, Ltd."— Shubert-Belasco, Wash., 

D. C Sept. IS. (Strike prevented open- 

Bltchey Koo of 1019 — Colonial, Boston, lndef. 
"Here Comes the Bride," Shnbert-Garrlck, 

Waxh., D. C, Sept.. 1-5. 
"Happy- Days — «.. T. Hippodrome,. N. Y. 
"Honeymoon Town" — La Salle, Chicago. 

(Closed by strike.) •. . 

"John Ferguson" — Fulton, New Tork City, ln- 
def. 
"Llghtrdn* " — Gayety, New York City, lndef. 

(Closed by actors strike.) 
"Lonely Borneo" — Casino, N. Y. (Closed by 

strike.) 
"Look Who's Here" — A.- of M. Baltimore, 

Sept 1-8. 
"La La Lucille" — Qarrlck-PhUa., lndef. 
"Listen, Lester" — Fords, Baltimore, Md.. 

Sept 1-8. 
"Midnight Whirl"— Century, New York. 

(Closed by strike.) • 

"Monte Cristo, Jr." — Winter Garden, New 
. Tork City. (Closed by strike.) 
"Nighty Night" — Princess, New. York .City. 

(Closed by actors' strike.) 
"On the Hiring Line" — Blackstone, Chicago. 
"Oh, What a Girl" — Shubert, New Tork. 

(Closed by strike.) 
"Oh. My Dear" — Wilbur. Boston, lndef. 
"Royal Vagabond, The" — Cohan A Harris, 

New York City. (Closed by strike.) 
"She's a Good FelloWGlobe, New Tork City, 

lndef. (Closed by actors' strike.) 
"Scandals of 1919" — Liberty, New Tork City. 

(Closed bv strike.) 
"Sec-Saw" — Tremont, Boston, Mass., lndef. 
"Somebody's Sweetheart" — Shubert, BoBton, 

lndef. 
"Three Wise Fools" — Power's, Chicago. 

(Closed by strike.) . 
"Those Who Walk in Darkness" — 48th St., 

New York City. (Closed by strike.) 
"Take It From Me" — Studebaker, Chicago. 

(Closed by strike.) 
"Thirty-nine East"— Marine Elliott New 

York City. (Closed by strike.) 
"Toby's Bow" — Adelphl, Philadelphia, Pa., ln- 
def. 
"On in Mabel's Boom" — Woods, Chicago, 111. 

(Closed by strike.) 
"Voice in the Dark, A" — Republic, New York. 

(Closed by strike.) 
"Zlegfeld Follies" — New Amsterdam (Closed 

by strike.) 



COLUMBIA WHEEL 

Al Reeves' Show — Open Sept 1-6 ; Gayety, St. 

Louis, 8-13. 
Abe Reynolds' Revue — Star, Cleveland, Sept 

1-0 • Empire. 8-13. 
Best Show In Town — Gayety, Boston, Sept. 1- 

6; Columbia, New Tork, 8-13. 
Ben Welch's Show — Gayety, Detroit, Sept. 

1-6; Gayety, Toronto, Ont., 8-18. 
Bebman Show— Majestic, Jersey City, Sept. 

1-6: Perth Amboy, 8; Plalnneld, 8: Stam- 
„ ford. Conn., 10 ; Park.Bridgeport, 11-18. 
Beauty Trust — Gayety, Kansas City, 1-6; St 

Joseph, Mo., 7 ; open, 8-13 ; Gayety, St. 

Louis, 15-20. 
Bill Watson's Parisian Whirl — BaBtable, Syra- 
cuse, Sept. 1-3: Lumberg, Otlcs, 4-6; 

«ayety, Montreal, Can., 8-13. 

Rontons— -Berchel, Des Moines, Sept., 1-4; 
Gayety, Omaha, Neb., 8-13. 

Bowery Burlesquers — Palace, Baltimore, Sept., 
" 1-6 ; Gayety, Washington, 8-13. 

BoBtman's — Gayety, Montreal, Can., Sept, 1- 
6; Empire, Albany, 8-13. 

Burlesque Review — Casino, Philadelphia. Sept. 

„ 1-6 ; Miner's 149th St, New York, d-18. 

Burlesque Wonder Show — Gayety, Washing- 
ton, Sept 1-6; Gayety, Pittsburgh, 8-18. 



JLJST 

Dave Marlon Show — Casino, Boston, Sept 1- 

6; Grand, Hartford, 8-13. 
Follies of the Day — Hurtlg and Seamon's, 
. New Tork, Sept 1-6; Orpheum, Paterson, 

8-13. 
Girls A-La-Carte — Stamford, Conn., 3; Park, 

Bridgeport. Conn., 4-6; Newburg, N. T., 8- 

10; Poagnkeepsle. 11-18. 
Girls of the tj. S. A. — Empire, Toledo, Ohio, 

Sept. l-e ; Lyric, Dayton, Ohio, 8-13. 
Golden Crooks, Gayety, Rochester. Sept. 1-6; 

Bastable, Syracuse, 8-10; Lemberg, Utlcs., 

11-13. 
Harry Hastings' Show — Grand, Hartford, 

Sept. 1-6: Jacques, Waterbury, Conn., 8-18. 
Hello, America ! — Columbia, Chicago, . Sept. 

1-6 ; Gayety, Detroit, 8-13. 
Hip-Hip. Hooray — Empire, Albany, N. T., 

Sept. .1-6; Casino. Boston. 8-13. 
Lew Kelly's Show — Empire, Newark, Sept 1-6 ; 

Casino, Philadelphia, 8-13. 
Liberty Girls — Newburg, N. Y., Sept. 1-3; 

Poogbkeepsle, 4-6; Gayety, Boston, 8-13. 
Maids - of America — Miners' Bronx. New 

York, Sept. 1-6 ; Casino, Brooklyn, 8-13. 
Million Dollar Dolls — Star and Garter, Chi- 
cago, Sept 1-6 ; Des Moines, Iowa, 7-10. 
Mollfe Williams ■ Co. — Jacques, Waterbnry, 
' Conn., Sept 1-6; Hurtlg A Seamon's, New 

Tork. 8-13. 
Oh! Girl— Columbia, New York, Sept. 1-6; 

Empire, Brooklyn, 8-13. 
' Peek-a-Boo — Gayety, St. Louis, 31 Sept. 6 ; 

Star at Garter, Chicago, 8-13. 
Roseland Girls — Lyric, Dayton, Ohio, Sept 

1-6 j Olympic, Cincinnati, 8-13. ' 
Rose Sydell's London Belles — Gayety, Buffalo, 

Sept. 1-6; Gayety, Rochester, 8-13. 
Sam Howe's Show— -Orpheum, Paterson, Sept. 

1-6; Majestic, Jersey City. 8-13. 
Sight Seers — Empire, Brooklyn, 8ept. 1-6; 

People's, Philadelphia, 8-13. 
Social Maids — Park, Youngstown, Ohio. Sept. 

1-3 : Grand, Akron, 4-6; Star, Cleveland, 

8-18. 
Sporting Widows — Peoples, Philadelphia, Sept. 

1-6 ; Palace, Baltimore, 8-13. Star and Gar- 
ter Shows— Gayety, Omaha, Sept 1-6; 

Gayety. Kansas City. 8-13. 
Step Lively Girls — Casino. Brooklyn, Sept 1- 

6; Empire, Newark, 8-13. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Gayety, Toronto, 

Ont., Sept 1-6; Gayety, Buffalo. . 8-13. 
Victory Belles— Olympic, Cincinnati, Sept 1- 

6 ; -Columbia, Chicago, 8-13. 

AMERICAN WHEEL 

All Jazz Review — Englewood, Chicago, Sept. 

16; Haymarket, Chicago, 8-13. 
Aviator Girls — Lyceum, wash., Sept. 1-6 ; 

Philadelphia, 8-13. 
Broadway Belles — Lyceum, Columbus. Ohio, 

Sept. 1-6: Victoria, Pittsburgh, 8-13. 
Beauty Review- — Gayety. Milwaukee, Sept. 1- 

6; Gayety, St. Paul, 8-13. 
Blue Birds — Cadillac. Detroit, Sept. 1-6; 

Englewood, Chicago, 8-18. . 
Cabaret Girls — Gayety, Louisville, Sept 1-6; 

Lyceum, Columbus, Ohio, 8-13. 
Cracker Jacks — Grand, Worcester, Mass., 

Sept. 1-6; Howard. Boston, 8-13. 
Dixon's Big Review— Trocadero, Philadelphia, 

Sept. 1-6 : Broadway, Camden, N. J., 8-13. 
Edmond Hayes Show — Gayety, Brooklyn, 

Sept. 1-6; Gayety, Newark, N. J., 8-13. 
Follies of Pleasure — Star, Brooklyn, Sept. 1-6 ; 

Plaza, Springfield, Mass., 813. 
French Frolics — Victoria, Pittsburgh, Sept 

1-6; Penn Circuit. 8-13. 
Girls from the Follies — Blnghamton, N. Y., 

Sept. 1-3; Niagara Falls, 4-6; Star, To- 
ronto, Can., 8-13. 
Girls from Joyland — Plaza, Springfield, Mass., 

Sept. 1-6; Grand, Worcester, 8-13, 
Girls. Girls, Girls — Army, Wrightstown, N. J., 

Sept. 1-6: Bijou, Philadelphia, 8-13. 
Grown Up Babies— Open Sept. 1-6 : Standard 

St. Louis, 8-13. 
Jazz Babies — Broadway, Camden, N. J., Sept 

1-6 :> Majestic, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 8-13. 
Kewple Dolls— Bijou, Philadelphia, Sept. 1-C ; 

Empire. Hoboken, N. J., 8-13. 
Lid Lifters — Haymarket, Chicago, Sept 1-6; 

Gayety, Milwaukee, 8-13. 
Midnight Maids — New Academy, Buffalo, N. 

Y Sept 1-6 ; Empire, Cleveland, 8-13. 
Mischief Makers — Park. Indianapolis, Sept. 

1-6; Gayety, Louisville. Ky.. 8-13. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Standard. St Louis, Sept 

1-6: Terre Haute, Ind. 7; Park, Indian- 
apolis, 8-13. 
"On, Frenchy" — Gayety, Sioux City, Iowa, 

Sept 1-6; Century, Kansas City, 8-13. 
Pacemakers— Gayety, Baltimore, Sept 1-6; 

Lyceum, Washington, 8-13. 
Parisian Flirts — Howard Boston, Sept 1-6; 

Olympic, New York, 8-13. 
Pat White Show — Century, Kansas City, Mo., 

Sept. 1-6 ; Standard, St Louis, 8-18. 

I Continued on page 32.) 




OOKINO 

DRAWING POPULATION OVER 300,000 




EZUIN/I 



PATERSON 'S PERFECT THEATRE, PATERSON, N. J. 

Capacity 1900. Playing only Legitimate Attractions First Three day* and 
Popular Price Shows the Last Three Days. For open time apply to 



LEW FREY 



FROM OVER THERE 
Ob th» Laww Tlasa-Taaaka to Co. SsAaaaU 



THOMAS P. JACKSON & CO. 

"ONCE A THIEF" 

By LAURENCE CRATTAN Of VAUDEVILLE 



GERTRUDE MORGAN 

Ttie Happy Little IVf las 

' DIRECTION— JrlAJUNELlJ 



JOSEPHINE 



WILCOX— La CROIX & CO 

Now Domg New Act— "COLD COFFEE" 



Br chaSv HORwrrz 



DIRECTION-LAWRENCE SCHWAB 



LOOK US OVER 

JOHN & NELLIE OLMS 

The Watch Wizards 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



HF1IF 



EVELYN 



M0NSELLE&WH1TEST0NE 



Sinking and Piano 



In VaudarOJ* 



ROBERT 



LE ROY & HARVEY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ALT H OFF SISTERS 



TWO GIRLS AND THE PIANO 



DIRECTION-HARRY WXBI 



ADONIS & CO. (?) 

A NEW ARTISTIC NOVELTY 



DIRECTION-ARTHUR aXETM 



1 launtinu. Dreamy. St-nsntitmal 



\s .,lt/ s. 



HAWAII Art MOOJN LIGHT 



Chicago McKlJSLiEY MUSIC - COMPANY 



.New York 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3, 1919 



THE LADDER LAD 

IN 

EQUILIBRIST! DIVERSION 



FORD & CUNNINGHAM 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



0f 

A LAUGH. A TUNE. A STEP 

DIRECTION-LEO FITZGERALD 



SUE OLMSTEAD 

Nicknamed in the A. E. F. as "Irresistible Sue" 



— CALLAHAN BROS. 



EAST— LAURENCE SCHWAB 



WEST— C. W. NELSON 



la tfc* Comady Clastic, "BAmdAm Furora" 
BOOKED SOUD KEITH TIME ■ DIRECTION JACK LEWIS 



DAISJ MICHAELS 



NEW YORK FOLLIES 



la an all star caat Hasical 



Comedy Entitled "A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING." 
Two Acta aad T wel va " 



LESSON Df PHYSICAL CULTURE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TECHOW'S CATS 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



DOING STRAIGHT 



STROUSE and FRANKLYN'5 ROUND THE TOWN 



ETHEL DEVEAUX 



SOUBRETTE 



HASTINGS RAZZLE DAZZLE OF Htt 



LEADING WOMAN 



WITH DIXON'S BIG REVIEW 



LORETTA AHEARN 

DAINTY SINGING AND DANCING SOUBRETTE-IL*JM» DOLLS 

FOR STOCK REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES, 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Book* for borne 
wiiw i nl, Metro Plan, Paper. S cene ry. Mrs. Jariey'* Wax 



PLAYS 



Works. Catalogue Prael Free! Freel 
SAMUEL I — 



FRENCH. » W.n JStb St, New York 



GERTRUDE O'CONNOR 

AS MRS. BOZO WITH EDMOND HAYES' OWN CO. 

CONNOLLY & FRANCES 

Fan and Music Jazzing- llu Harmonica and Grandma'* Melodeea. Dlrrrtlnn MsmM * Rose 

HAROLD KENNEDY 



COMEDIAN 



GIRLS A LA CARTE 



IRENE LEAKY 



INGENUE 



BURLESQUE REVIEW 



frank BURKE am WALCH B,LlY 



ANNA DOUGHERTY 

' INGENUE 

"GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS" COMPANY 




• ■■■'■-^:': 1 ;--. ■■■ ■-''. 

■ ... ■• ■ . ■ 




la ard o r to araU arlatakaa and to insure th. pranart de n very at tha I* ttara 
fta tfcte list, a POSTAL CARD must ha .rot r e au s stla g na t*> forward year latter. 
" with yaor tail nana* aad th* address to which tha latter Is to ba seat, 
followed by tha sender obeead bo mearlarni. 

tha data (or number) af the CUPPER he which, th. letters 



It 



GENTLEMEN 

Adas*. Bchty c*1ih*a. Check Giao* 4 Haw Goala, Fiiak 

Bo»le. Jet DunUran MlttaFaiiaoo. Joe Bunt, Ue 

Brown. Leooud Dertoe, Harry Fnser A Mat Bolaa, Oto. 

Bojle. Joe EUton. J. Fuian * Hehraffif frr. *Xm 

' J. A. KuV. aertea Tint. Barney Kale. 



B«W 



HoMta . Eddie Rider. Diet 
Mr»nill«n, Jo* Bamsr. a B. 
Malbew*. Bar* 8car)ett,_U Sol 
Oakley. Hu>7 



Aran, Glenn C an Urn, G*onrt*FieBblkb, End* 
Brora, Mary Out. Mo. Don Huts 
Braes, New* Colby, Che*. B, ray. Bead' 
Bond, Lonte Darts. Sophie TiarUn*, *ffle. 
Bury, Halo. Dehnore, Addle Goad. Kit* 
Bhts, Mn. Lcctm 



5*5. 
Laactt, Dan 



Meirtn. Babt Boon; Beth Terry, Jan 
Bluer, Annas** Bio*. IMtd* Than*, Want 
Bmsr, Mm ' Bruno. Baby SaMt " 
bobo L. Out. K. sehsdot . agae* Watts, Ba 

Jor». Ieube BeOua. Mom* Tacaasoa. Ztta, BO*. 

La Brack, Frinkie Merrill. Beth 



lantta 



WANTED AT ONCE 



for Tramp Conusdy DramBV, roan for tramp with apeeialtlaN. character woman who ring*, character heavy 
LDd ge n, fa man and JnTcnile. Thoae tloinc ipecialtie. preferred. Alto, far. th* nrntloal oomody, "THE 

3HtX HEXT DOOR," prima donna, Juvenile tenor, •oubrette for Swede character, character old man. 



for Tramp 

qaartette and vaudeville people who play parts, Chora* etrl«, sister act. state age (correct), weight, 
height, paograms, lowest .alary, pay own. P. 8. — Ben ont of service, write. 

SEW AJCERICAJT sT.TXffTI SHOWB. ZXO., Concord, New HaaPsMra, 




Battle Daule Girls— Majestic, Wilkea-Barre, 

Pa., Sept. 1-6 ; Majestic, Scranton Pa., 8-13. 
Record-Breokers — Penn Circuit, Sept 1-6; 

Gavery. Baltimore, 8-13. 
Bound the Town — Majestic, Scranton, Pa., 

Sept. 1-6 ; Blngbamton, N. Y. , 8-10 : Niagara 

Falls, 11-13. 
Sliding: Billy Watson — Empire, Cleveland, 

Sept. 1-6; Cadillac, Detroit, 8-13. 
Social Follies — Gayety, Newark, N. J., Sept 

1-6; Army, Wrigntstown, N. J., 8-13. 
Some Show-^-Star, Toronto, Ont., Sept. 1-6; 

New Academy, Buffalo, N. I, 8-13. 
Sport Girls — Olympic, New York, Sept. 1-6; 

Gayety. .Brooklyn, 8-18. 
Stone & Pfllard's— Gayety, Minneapolis, Sept. 

l-«; Gayety, Sioux City. Iowa. 8-13. 
Sweet Sweetie Girls — Empire, Hoboken, Sept. 

l-O; Star, Brooklyn, 8-13. 
Tempters — Gayety, St. Paul, Sept. 1-6 ; Gay- 
ety, Minneapolis. 8-13. 

PENN CIRCUIT 

Wheeling, W. Va. Monday. 

I TJnlontown, Pa. — Tuesday. 
, Johnstown, Pa. — Wednesday. 
1 Altoona, Pa. — Thursday. 

Williamsport. Pa. — Friday. 

York, Pa. — Staturday. - . .*■ 

MINSTRELS 

Gog Hill's — Beading, Pa., 3; Allentown, 4; 
Trenton. N. J., 5 and 6. 

Al G. Fields— Louisville, Ky., Sept. 1-6 ; Nash- 
ville, Term., 7-9. 

Renix Bros.— NelllsvUle. Wis., 8-13 ^'Chatta- 
nooga. 10-11; Knoxvllle. . 12-13. 

STOCKS 

Albee Stock. Providence.' B. I., Indef. 

Arlington Theatre Co. — Boston, Mass., index. 

Alcazar Players — Alcazar, San Francisco, Cal. 

Baker Players — Portland, Ore- lndef . • <• 

Blaney Stock— Yorkvtile, New York City. . 

Bessey, Jack, Stock — Peoria, 111., lndef. 

Belgrade, Sadie — New Bedford, Mass., lndef. 

Brlasac, Virginia, Stock — Strand, San Diego, 
Cal., lndef. 

Brown, George, Stock — Whalen Park, Fitch- 
burg, Mass., lndef. 

Booth, Nellie, Players — Pittsburgh, Pa., lndef. 

Brownell-Stock — Dayton, Ohio, lndef. 

Byers. Fred, Stock— Waverly, N. T.. lndef. 



ChampUn, Chas. K. — Dover, K. X, 1-6; Red 

BankT8-13. 
Chicago, Stock — Altoona, Pa., lndef. 
Crawford, Ed., Stock— Bath. Me., indef. 
Colonial Stock— Plttsneld, Mass., indef. 
Colonial Stock — Cleveland, Ohio, lndef. 
Dominion Players — Winnipeg,' Manitoba, Can., 

lndef. 
Durkin Stock — Showhegan, Me., lndef. - 
Desmond, Mae, Players — Scranton, Pa., lndef. 
Del Lawrence Co. — Majestic, San Francisco, 

Cal., lndef.- 
Enterprise Stock Co. — Green Bay, Wis., indef. 
Forest Park Musical Stock — St. Louis, Mo. 
Grand Theatre Stock Co.— Tulsa, Okla., indef. 
Gardner Bros. Stock Co. — Palace, Oklahoma 

City, Okla., Indef. 
G laser, Vaueban, Musical Stock — Cleveland, 

Ohio, index. 
Hunt's Mnalcal Stock — Boston, Mass., lndef. 
HowardrLorn Stock — National, Englewood, 

IB., indef. . 
Hawkins-Webb Co. — Regent, Muskegon, Mich.. 

indef: 

Hawkins-Webb Co. |2) — Powers, Grand 
Baplds, Mich., indef. 

Keith stocls — Columbus, Ohio, indef. 

Keith Players — Union Hill, N. J. 

Knickerbocker' Players — Syracuse, N. X_ in- 
dex. - 

Liscomb Players — Majestic, San Francisco, 
Cal.. indef. 

Liberty Players — Strand, San Diego, Cal., ln- 
def. . :- 

Liberty Players — Norumbega Park. Mass., ln- 
def. ' .- . . 

Lyceum Theatre Stock — Duluth, Minn., lndef. 

Lyric Stock — Lincoln, Neb., Index. 

Lyric Theatre Players— Hamilton, Qan 

MucLean, Pauline, Stock— Celeron Park, N. Y. 

Majestic Theatre Stock — Los Angeles, Cal., 
lndef. 

Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. T_ lndef. 

Marshall Stock — Washington, D. C„ Tndef. 

Morosco Stock— Los Angeles, CaL, lndef. 

Mlnturn Stock — Milwaukee, Wis., lndef. 

Orpheum Players — Montreal, Can., indef. 

Otis Olive Players — La Fayette, Ind., Indef. 

Permanent Players Orpheum, Moose Jaw, 
S ask. Can., lndef. 

Piney Theatre Stock Co. — Boise, Idaho, lndef. 

Park Theatre Stock — Utica, N. Y., indef. 

Poll Players, Springfield, Mass., lndef. 

Poll Players — Waterbury, Mass., Index. 

Poll Players — Wllkesbarre, Pa„ lndef. 



DEATHS IN THE PROFESSION 



m 



ARTIE NELSON, a vaudeville performer, 
died last week at Bellevue Hospital from 
puenmonla. He was taken sick while liv- 
ing at the N. V. A. He was rushed to the 
hospital for medical attention bat suc- 
cumbed. 

HERBERT AYLING, for forty-two years 
a well-known character actor, died sud- 
denly last Friday.- He was last playing; 
-The ' Old Butler with the George Tyler 
Company in "Among; Those Present." Be- 
fore that be played wltn Maude Adams, 
Louis Waller, with Rose Stahl.In "Maggie 
Pepper," and with John Drew and others. 
He was prominent in Daley's Stock ■ Com- 
pany and in Wallack's Stock Company. In 
moving pictures, Mr. Ayling played with 
Ann Murdock. Miss Harrison and others. 

Mr. Ayling; la survived by his wife, Heine 
Ayling. who resides at 102 West 58th 
Street. Funeral services were held at 
The Funeral Church under the auspices of 
The Actors' Fund. 



THOMAS WHITE, who, at one time, he- 
longed to "The Pink Lady" company, tour- 
ing Europe and America, and was one of 
the best known stage carpenters in the 
east, died last week at a hospital in New 
Tork. He will be burled in Morrisvllle, 
. Pa. He had been attached to the Trent 
and Taylor Opera House in Trenton, N. J.. 
for many years. 

MAUDE EARLE GAMBLES, died oil Aug. 

13th, at Somervllle, Mass., of consumption. 
She was thirty-three years old 'and' made- her 
hist appearance with Gus Hill's Mutt and 
Jeff Company. Her mother, brother and a 
Bister survive her.. ,- .■',-> v;-.. 

IRVING KAUFMAN, known as "Slim- 
by followers of burlesque, dropped dead on 
•- Fourteenth Street, New York, near the 
Olympic Theatre -last, Monday night, Aug. 
26th. He had worked bits in stock for 
Don Clark and Harry Steppe, the Mat two 
Summers. 



September 3, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 




PICTURES 



START MOVE TO 

REPEAL WAR 

TAX 

GET HEARING THIS WEEK 



Cod 



The first step to remove the theatre tax 
imposed during the war was made last 
week when' the motion picture exhibitors 
arranged for a tax revision hearing be- 
fore the Waya and Means Committee of 
the House of Representatives. It will be 
held sometime this week when they - will 
have an opportunity to lay before the 
committee the exact ..position of the" ex- 
hibitors regarding the three" taxes now on 
motion picture theatres. Flans for the 
hearing are now being prepared by Louis 
F. Blumenthal of New York, chairman of 
the committee of exhibitors who have 
charge of the campaign to repeal the 
tax. 

While the scheme, at present, only con- 
cerns film theatres, it is said that repre- 
sentatives of other interests will soon 
join until all amusements are represented. 

Exhibitors all over the country are eup- 

rting House Bill No. 8493 introduced by 
_ ngressman Julius Kahn from California, 
and daily thousands of letters from exhibit- 
ors, movie patrons and theatre-goers in 
general are pouring into Congress, petition- 
ing it to repeal the three taxes. In addi- 
tion to this, some of the leading members 
of both sides of the House are heartily in 
accord with the views of the exhibitor and 
patron. 

One of the leading members of the upper 
House, Senator George W. Norris. of Ne- 
braska, has joined the ranks supporting the 
Legislation and Tax Committee of the Mo- 
tion Picture Exhibitors. In answer to the 
committee's first questionnaire' he said that 
be did not think there 'was much likelihood 
of bringing about a repeal of motion pic- 
tore taxes. To which Chairman Blumen- 
thal replied in a long letter emphasizing 
some of the pointed arguments for the re- 
peal. 

Senator Norris wrote the following 
reply: 

United States Senate 

August 23, 1919. 
Dear Mr. Blumenthal: 

I have read with interest your favor 
of the 1st instant, and wish to thank you 
for this full explanation of the effect of 
the tax levied by the last enactment of 
War Revenue measures upon the motion 
picture exhibitors of the country, and 
their patrons. While I have received a 
few complaints before, they were made in 
moat general terms, and gave me only a 
vague idea of the facts. It seems to me 
there is merit in your complaint and it 
will have, I assure you, my sympathetic 
consideration. 

Thanking you for your letter, permit 
me to remain, 

Very truly yours, 

G. W. Norms. 

This is but one of the many letters re- 
ceived by the committee from Congress- 
men, voicing- the same .opinion held -by 
Senator Norris. When the committee finds 
a member of Congress who expresses doubt 
as. to the injustice of the motion picture 
taxes he is at once met with formidable 
arguments and everything is done to ally 
nun to the cause. 



MUTUAL FORCE CHANGES 

Exhibitors' Mutual has announced the 
following changes in its field "force. Fred 
G. Sliter is now special field representa- 
tive, 0. W. Moore is acting manager of 
the exchange at Pittsburgh. W. I* Parker 
» now in the executive offices, M. L. 
Mints is manager of the Chicago branch 
and John ' Melshwelmer is chief clerk ; of 
the Chicago exchange. 



LESSER MOVES OFFICES HERE 

; The mam offices of" Sol L. Lesser .will, 
"hereafter, be in New York instead of -San 
Francisco. . This change is the result of his 
success with "Yankee 1 Doodle In Berlin," 
which was an experiment to see whether 
it would be profitable to establish an east- 
ern organization for the purpose of book- 
ing feature photoplays for long runs in 
legitimate houses. 

Hereafter, Lesser will buy national, in- 
stead of state rights on features and play 
them in large theatres in the leading cities 
for long runs, much the same as the Shu- 
berta or Klaw and Erlanger send out le- 
gitimate attractions. 

"Yankee Doodle In Berlin" played eight 
weeks on Broadway, two now at the 
Montauk, Brooklyn, and will play one 
week at Teller's Shubert and the Bronx 
Opera House: The picture is booked for 
twenty-two more weeks. in Greater New 
York. After a five weeks' booking at the 
Ziegfeld Theatre, Chicago, it still has 
seventeen weeks of shorter bookings in 
the Windy City. 

The heads of Leaser's newest enterprise 
are Ira H. Simmons, sales manager of the 
New York Exchange, Howard Herrick, ad- 
vance man. and Max Schenek and Frank 
M. Gillespie, production managers. Leasers 
will maintain branch offices in San Fran- 
cisco, Los Angeles, Cleveland and Seattle. 

NEW FILM FIRM FORMED 

The Catherine Curtis Corporation is a 
newly formed corporation with head- 
quarters for production at Los Angeles 
and main offices at 120 Broadway. Miss 
Curtis is president of the company, George 
M. Taylor, vice-president and Dorman T. 
Connett, secretary and treasurer. The 
company, which has the backing of some 
well known' financiers, has the following 
board of directors: 

Arthur F. Spalding, Malcolm McLellan 
and Robert M Simpson, all members of 
the New York Stock Exchange and New 
York Cotton Exchange; George M. Taylor, 
E. R. Pirtle and Albert L. Jndson, capital- 
ists; George J. Whalen, president of the 
United Cigars Stores Company; Reese 
Llewellyn, president of the Llewellyn Iron 
Works, and William Dewey Louck, attor- 
ney. Loucks & Alexander are counsel for 
the corporation. 

GOLDWYN TO START BIG DRIVE 
A nation-wide drive ' for Goldwyn pic- 
tures will be inaugurated by that organ- 
ization during the week of September 8 
to 14. At that time, the company will be 
three years old. Meetings have been held 
in all of the various exchanges and the 
entire sales force has been keyed up with 
the additional slogan for those six days 
of "This is a Goldwyn week" to that of 
the Goldwyn national- slogan of "This is 
a Goldwyn Year.'' 

ENLARGE, GOLDWYN STUDIOS 

Cueveb Crrr", Cal, Aug. 30. — Due to the 
fact that six productions are already un- 
der way at the Goldwyn studio here and 
it is necessary to accommodate two more, 
enlargement of the. studio has been be- 
gun. A new (25,000 stage which will 
enable eight companies to work is being 
constructed and eight companies -are ex- 
pected to be well under way within three 
weeks. 



BUSHMAN EFFECTS SOLD 

The total, amount of the sale of art 
works, tapestries and furniture of Francis 
X. Bushman, to satisfy the claims of his 
wife for alimony, was $8,130.75. All of 
the articles sold were disposed of at very 
low prices. ..... 

JUSTICE TO DIRECT 

Martin Justice is to direct Mary Pick- 
ford in her next picture, "Pollyanna." 



VIT AGRAPH GETS 

TWELVE BIG 

AUTHORS 

OBTAINS SOME FAMOUS NAMES 



Albert E. Smith, president of Vitagraph, 
has announced that his company - has 
signed twelve of America's greatest au- 
thors. George Randolph Chester, known 
to all magazine readers for his "Walling- 
ford" 'stories and who is editor of Vita- 
graph, is responsible, in part, for this 
measure. 

The. -policy of the Vitagraph win be to 
produce a feature by one of the dosen 
each month, for the season of 1019-1920. 
Should both parties be satisfied with the 
outcome of the experiment, it ia likely 
that a farther contract will be executed. 

The list of authors includes Mary Rob- 
erts Rinehart, Robert W. Chambers, Rex 
Beach, Richard Harding Davis, O'Henry, 
Booth Tarkington, Irvin S. Cobb, Amelia 
Rives, George Ade, Gouvenier Morris 
Rupert Hughes and George Randolph 
Chester. 

The first of this series to be released 
will be Rex Beach's "The Vengeance of 
Durand," to be put on the market No- 
vember 10th. 

This move on the part of Vitagraph pro- 
vides a source of supply for material 
hard to excell. 



HAROLD LLOYD HURT 

Los Angeles, CaL, Aug. 29. — Harold 
Llyod, while working on a new comedy 
and performing the stunt of lighting a 
cigarette from a bomb, was severely hurt 
when the bomb exploded. It was thought 
that the affair was a harmless "prop" and 
Llyod calmly put his cigarette to the fuse. 
The bomb then went up, burning Lloyd's 
chest and face, shattering his hand and 
also hurting his eyes. He was rushed to 
a hospital, where the forefinger and thumb 
of his right hand were amputated, • 

The comedian is resting well, but 'it is 
as yet impossible to determine the ex- 
tent to which his eyes will be affected. 
The photographer and his assistant, who 
were in the room at the time of the ex- 
plosion, were thrown to the ground, but 
not hurt. 



TO GET LABOR CHARTER 

It was announced last week at a meet- 
ing of the Motion Picture Workers Union 
of Greater New York,, that the union's 
application for a charter in the American 
Federation of Labor had been presented 
and that a charter would be given it soon. 
The union consists of managers, door- 
keepers, ticket-choppers, ushers, special 
officers and porters. , 

Samuel Tollman, attorney for the union, 
made the announcement, and after the 
meeting said that the first demands that 
would be made would be for increased 
wages, better hours and better general 
working conditions. 

The union also unanimously adopted a 
resolution tendering the sympathy of their 
organization to the striking actors. 



HELD IN FILM LARCENY 

Louis Savine, proprietor of a motion 
picture theatre on Lenox avenue and 143rd 
street, was arraigned last week on an in- 
dictment charging him with criminally 
receiving stolen goods. He was held in 
$2,500 bail by Judge William H. Wad- 
hams in General Sessions, for trial. 

It is charged that the defendant has 
in his possession 13,000 feet of film stolen 
from the Famous Players Lasky Corpora* 
tion, from the Universal Film Company 
and from the Jester Comedies. 



| » FILM FLASHES ""| 

Uojd Whiteside Is doing publicity work 
tor the Vitagraph under B. M. C'onlon. 

H. 22. Lot* baa been appointed manager for 
Select at the lob Angeles exchange. 

W. W. Hodklnaon has arranged to handle 
the Billle Bbodes features in the future. 



E. J. Smith and Ralph Abbott respectively 
the Cleveland and Cincinnati managers of 
the Universal, are In town. 

Bdltb Sterling Is featured In "The Arlsoaa 
Cat Claw," a five reel picture which the 
World has bought. 

Theodore Boberta has signed a sew con- 
tract with Famous Players-Laaky. to plaj 
characters. 



J. Orubb Alexander has arranged to fur- 
nlah screen vehicles for Jesse D. Hampton 
stars. 

Alice Lake Is featured In "Teas of the 

D'DbervUle," on which work was started last 
week. 



The Co-Operatlve Film Company discon- 
tinued business last week. 



Fred C. Qulmby baa returned to New York 
after a seven weeks' tour of the Pathe ex- 
changes. 

William FSrnum last week started work 
on "It I were King." J. Gordon Edwards 
la directing it 

The next picture which Corrlnne Griffith 
will make for the Tltagrapb la entitled "The 
Tame Wife." 



Under the direction of T. Hares Hunter, 
•The Cup of Fury" has been started at the 
Goldwyn studios. 

Elsie Ferguson and her company are at 
Mlltprd, Pa., completing exteriors on "Coun- 
terfeit" written by Oulda Bergere. 

Water HcGrall has been signed by Myron 
Selznlck' ' to play opposite Elaine Hammer- 
stela la "The Country Conuin." 



E. C. Beatty, general manager and booking 
agent of the Butterfleld Circuit of Michigan, 
Is In New York selecting features. 

Frederick P. Flanagan la now a member 
of the sales force of the Educational Depart- 
ment of the Famous Players-Leaky company. 

Victor M. Shapiro has Joined the Pathe. 
He will do exploitation work under P. A. 
Parsons. He recently returned from France. 



Work on "The Copperhead" win be begun 
early In September by the Famous Plsyers- 
Lasky Corporation. Lionel Barrymore will 
be starred and Charles Malgne will direct it. 

"Eastward Ho" Is the title' of the next 
film In which William Eussel win be seen. 
Bmmett J. Flynn will* direct It William Fox 
Is producing the picture. 

William T. Butler, until recently special 
representative for Lloyd Willis, of the united 
Picture Theatres, has signed with Herman 
Rifkln, of Boston. 

Mary Murlllo, who has returned from 
England, will shortly commence work on 
two stories for Norma. Talmadge, having 
Joined the Norma Talmadge Film Company. 

Harry Hoodlnl baa signed a second contract 
with the Famous Player»-L«aky Company 
and will be seen In productions made by that 
company this year. 



Elaine Hammersteln and her company have 
gone" to Cooperstown, N. T., in search of 
proper scenes for "The Country Cousin," in 
wblcb she will next be seen. 

Joseph Henaberry, who recently completed 
directing Douglas Fairbanks la "His Majesty, 
the American," has signed with Louis N. 
Mayer to direct Mildred Harris fl<»piii In 
her new series. 

Wheeler Dryden will be seen in "Wheeler's 
Winning Ways" as bis first attempt for the 
Universal. He is just back from a tonr of 
the Orient and Is the son of Leo Dryden, 
the English author and actor. 



Theodore Boberta. after Ore years of work 
on the screen, has signed a new contract with 
the Famous Flayers-Leaky Company. Rob- 
erts does not intend to return to the spoken 
itage. 



Elliott Dexter** first effort for the Famous 
Players- Leaky Company will be In "The 
Prince Chap." Be will start work early In 
October after he recovers completely from 
the breakdown which laid him up. 
(Continued oa next p«oe.) 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 3; 1919 



FILM FLASHES 

(Continued from p«x» XJ) 



Elizabeth Peterson bas been added to the 
Fox publicity staff. 

Jesae L. Lasky has returned from his so- 
journ In California. 

Blllie Burke In "The Misleading Widow" 
Is featured at the Bialto this week. 



Kathleen O'Connor started work on "The 
Strange Case of Cavendish" last week. 

Jack slower will play in the serial in 

which Eileen Percy Is to be featured. 

Krltzle Brunette will be J. Warren Kerri- 
gan's leading woman In his next picture. 

Goldwyn has just "added to its scenario 
staff. Harvey Tbew and Charles Kenyon. ■ 

William K. Hollander, motion picture edi- 
tor of the Chicago .Daily News, is in town. 

William Desmond's first picture under 
Robertson Cole will be "Dangerous Waters." 

"The Wreck," featuring Anita Stewart, 
is one of the forthcoming Vitagraph releases. 

Sam Polo, formerly a circus performer, 
-will be seen in the next Antonio Moreno 
serial. 



Tom Moore, in "Heartsease" is at the 
Bialto this week. It is a Goldwyn produc- 
tion. 



Frank Rogers has been made district man- 
ager for the Central Weat territory by the 
"Pathe. . 



Blllie Rhodes' second appearance for the 
Hodkinson company wffl be In "Hearts and 
Masks." 



Doty Hobart has been engaged as film edi- 
tor for the Paxamoant-Brlggs cartoons by 
Alex Yokel 



Following' her appearance In "The Climb-" 
■era." Corrinne Griffith will be seen In "The 
Tame Wolf." 



Henry King has signed a long term con- 
tract with Jesse D. Hampton to direct spe- 
cial features. - 



"The Virtuous Model" is the big feature 
of tbe program that .Pathe will release on 
-September 14. 

Arthur Krows has been appointed assistant 
scenario director Of the Yltagrapn, succeed- 
ing Lucien Hubbard. 

"The Unpointed Pen" Is the title of a 
story by Edwin August which tbe World Pic- 
tures has purchased. 

Virtus R. Scott has been made assistant 
to Myron Selznlck. replacing James Dent, 
-who was promoted. 

"The VaBey of the Giants," featuring 
Wallace Held, "is "tbe feature attraction at 
tbe Rlvoll this week. 



Tbe first of the Fall releases of the Uni- 
versal will be "The Breath of the Gods." It 
will feature Tsorn Aokl. 



Ruby DeKemer is to play opposite E. K. 
Lincoln In "The Crucible." which American 
Cinema Arts will produce. 



Douglas MacLean and Doris May have 
started work on "Mary's Ankle." which 
Thomas Ince is producing. . . 

Owen Moore's first appearance with tbe 
Selznlck company wil be in "Piccadilly Jim," 
written by P. G. Wodehouse. 



Blgelow Cooper and Vivien Toby will DC 
seen In "The Country Cousin." now in pro- 
duction at the Selznlck studios. 



Louise Glaum's new picture Is almost ready 
and is being completed rapidly under the 
management of J. Parker Bead, Jr. 

•■Americanism "Versus Bolshevism" Is being 
produced at the Thomas EL Ince studio. C 
Gardner Sullivan wrote the story. 



"The Amazing Lovers," the first of the 
Flscber productions, is almost finished. It Is 
from tbe story by Robert Chambers. 

Raymond McKee has signed with the 
World. His first appearance with that com- 
pany will be opposite Evelyn Greeley. 

Dorothy Gtsb is featured at the BItoU this 
week in "Nobody Home." written by tola 
Zellner and directed by Elmer Clifton. 

Frank Lloyd will next appear in fThe 
Silver Horde" for Goldwyn. The company 
has gone to Seattle for a number of scenes. 

Gladys Leslie baa started work on "The 
Golden Shower," for tbe Vitagraph. Marie 
Eve wrote It. John W. Noble u directing it. 

Thomas Hardy's "Teas of the Durber- 
rille" has been adapted for the screen by 
Finis Fox of the Screen Classics scenario 
staff. 



pear with Geraldlne Farrar and Anita 
Stewart. 



Howard Dietz. formerly of Goldwyn's pub- 
licity department, has been appointed man- 
ager of the exploitation and service depart- 
ment. 



'Tbe Gamblers," written by the late 
Charles Klein and featuring Harry T. Morey, 
Is scheduled for release this month by the 
Vitagraph. - - - 

Warren Washington has signed with the 
Vitagraph to direct the next of the two-reel 
O'Henry stories, to be called "Buried 
Treasure." 

Prixrtlla Dean- has signed with the Uni- 
versal for' a long term of "years and -will ap- 
pear In a series to be called Universal Super- 
Productions. 



"A- Sisterly Scheme" is the Paramount- 
Drew comedy release for August. Mrs. Sid- 
ney Drew directed the picture and also played 
the stellar role In it. 



Ralph O. Proctor, general manager of the 
United Artists Corporation, reached New 
York last week after a tour of the exchanges 
of the company. 

William Cropper has been engaged to 
make Impressionistic sketches of various 
Goldwyn stars aa they appear In their differ- 
ent characterizations. 



Ai Ligori. who has Just completed photo- 
graphing "The Firing Line," with Irene Cas- 
tle, has signed with Paul Scardon, director 
for the Great Pictures Corporation. 

C. A. Srinson. genera] sales manager for 
the. American Film Company arrived In Chi- 
cago last week with a print of "Six Feet 
Four," wblch features William Bussel. 



Boecoe Situ, who originated the part of 
Jack Rutherford in "Civilian Clothes." baa 
signed with the Brentwood company to play 
opposite Zasu Pitts in ber newest production. 

Alexander Gaden, who has been absent for 
almost a year from tbe screen will be Doris 
Kenyon's leading man in "The Bandbox," 
which Is being produced by the Deitrich-Beck 
company. . 

The first Douglas Fairbanks release 
through the United Artists Corporation will 
be "His Majesty, the American." It will be 
let out on September 1. The picture is in 
eight reels. 

Alice Joyce, after a month of rest at Hot 
Springs. \a.. returned to New York last 
week and started work on "Pride," by Will- 
iam B. Courtney. George Terwillger is di- 
recting it. 

Frank Smith, of KIrby and Smith, pro- 
moters of the Edgar Jones productions, made 
in Augusta. Heine. Is- back in New York with 
three two-reel pictures. They are stories of 
the Xorthwoods. 



The Normandy Theatre Company of Brook- 
lyn has been- incorporated for $125,000 by 
Max Oestrlcher, Henry Oestrlcber, and Sam- 
uel Bbonbeximer. to operate at 226 St. 
James Place. 



Frank Currier, of the Metro, will be seen 
In the role of the soap baron In "It Paya to 
Advertise." which Paramount Is producing. 
Tbe Metro "loaned" him to the Famous Play- 
ers company. 

Lovely Helene Chadwick and Rockcllffe 
Fellows will play the leading roles in "The 
Cup of Fury," by. Rupert Hughes. It Is the 
first of tbe Goldwyn company's Eminent 
Authors' Series. 



. Harry Carey's newest western drama will 
be based on a well known story in the Sat- 
urday Evening Post by Peter B. Kyne and 
will be called "The Gift of the Desert." Uni- 
versal is producing it- 
Max Manne. trap drummer at the Rlvoll 
wrote the scenario for a new Mutt and Jeff 
cartoon which Is being shown at the Rlvoll 
this week. Manne also wrote the musical 
accompaniment for the picture. 

"The Crooked Dagger," the Jack Norworth 
serial, will be started next week by Theodore 
Wharton. Frances White will be Norworth's 
leading woman. The picture will be pro- 
duced at tbe new Ithaca studio. 



Hugo Reisenfeld was elected a director in 
both tbe Bialto Theatre Corporation and Bid- 
die Realty Corporation, the latter of which 
operates the Rlvoll. at the last meeting of 
the directors of these organizations. 



Carlyle BlackweU, who recently organized 
his own company is now in New Mexico 
where he is making Indian scenes for his 
first independent picture. Myrtle Owen and 
Gloria Hope have left Los Angeles to Join 
him. 



Edward J. Connelly la back at the Screen 
Classics studio after being permitted to ap- 



Joe H. Mayer, formerly publicity manager 
and exploitation man of the Universal Cin- 
cinnati -exchange, will act as director of ex- 
change publicity during the time Harry Bice, 
who was recently injured, is unable to at- 
tend to the duties of that office. 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"CHECKERS" 

Fax. Sp^cUl Feature. 

Checker* Thotnat J. Carrigan 

Pert Barlow. Jean Acker 

ilea Komainc Ellen Canity 

Arthur Kendall Robert Elliott 

Pu*h Hitler.....'. Tammanv Young 

fudge Bartow Bertram Marburgh 

Pete Ed. •Sedgwick 

Sadie Martin.. T Peggy Worth 

Col. TForren ....Frani Beamith 

Sam Wah ..Freeman Barnes 

Chinese Girl ....Oene Bucus 

A Girl o/ the Slums Juliet Crane 

Hag .....Anna Heilson 

Ballet Dancer Dorothy Orth' 

Kendall's Chauffeur. frank OConnell 

Kendall's Trainer. .'Frank Budenberry 

Col. Warren'* Vote* ; Paul Potter 

Chinatoien Guides. . .Charlie Pang, F. Honda 

Pug Malone Matthew T. Bentz 

Splint Eonan Henry Armetta 

Pert'* Jockey .' Harry Pierce 

Kendall'* Jockeys, 

W. A. Bowman, B. J. Katzman, Jo* Jackson 

Trainman Jam** Dwyer 

Hotel Clerk...: ..Leo Oioerg 

Opiums Smokers. . . . .Dan Dwyer, James Ryan 

Policeman Jerry Flanagan 

Story — Melodrama. Adapted from Henry 
Blossom's play by the same name. Directed 
by Richard Stanton. Featuring all-star 
cast. . • . . 



"EVANGELINE' 

Fox— Five Reels 



-••THE -RED VIPER" 

Tyrad. Six Rcete.- .- 

Gas* 

David Belkov.... Gareth Hughes 

Mary lloijan : . . ., Ruth Stonehou,- 

Dick throne .• L .Jack Gilbert 

Yolanda Kosloff :.'.:.': It-ma Harrison 

Charles Smith ...... .H. B. Fitfimmont 

Mrs. Hogan '.Alberta Lee 

Dan Hogan Alfred HolUngsteorth 

Story — Dramatic. Written and scenarlted bv 

Winifred Dunn. Directed by Jacques Tyrol. 

Featuring all-star cast. 



The story of "Checkers" is well-known to 
most people and will be known by practically 
every one before tbe film's run is over. While 
there are one or two points that were in 
the play by Henry M. Blossom that leave 
themselves to be desired in the film, their 
absence win not be noticed by the majority 
of the public Tbe production will certainly 
draw the kiddies, and they will draw their 
parents, who will undoubtedly enjoy the film 
just as much, if not more, than the kids. 

For thrills, suspense and Interest, the pro- 
duction Is "all there," as the expression goes. 
What more can one desire In an old-fashioned 
melodrama than a thrilling horse-race, a' 
railroad wreck, a kidnapping and a thrilling 
rescue that has a corking fight In it? These, 
put together, with tbe familiar love affair of 
Checkers, the race-track tout, and Pert Bar- 
low, will please those who have seen the play 
before. Top setting- of the film are very good, 
the photography especially so, and the work 
of the cast is excellent. 

Box Office Value 

Run. - 



Despite tbe fact that many pictures have 
been released during the last few years having 
the same theme as "The Bed Viper," the fact 
that the production "has been released at a 
timely moment and -the cast, settings and 
manner in wblch tbe plot, is .brought out are 
all good, will make it interesting. 

David Belkov Is a young man wbo has 
been brought up. on the East Side among tbe 
ignomnt classes. He bas built Ideals for 
himself patterned after the life of the late 
Colonel Koosevelt. 

His sweetheart is Yolanda, a girl wbo bas 
allied herself with an anarchist band beaded 
by Smltb, her guardian. 

Living In the same alley with David is little 
Mary Hogan, a hot patriot, and wbo often 
drowns out the noise of the anarchists' meet- 
ings by whistling "Yankee Doodle." At one 
of these meetings, which David attends, re- 
luctantly, Yolanda la chosen to kill Judge 
Norton, who has just sentenced one of the 
band. David, at the same time, is chosen 
to print a number of circulars calling upon 
tbe masses for an uprising. He does so, and 
after distributing them, feels the pangs of 
conscience. The last straw cornea when Mary 
Is killed in saving tbe life of ber sweetheart, 
Dick Crane, from a band, of tbe anarchists. 
He placea her vision next to T. R.'s and 
.rushes back to the printing press, where be 
turns out a large number of circulars against 
the anarchists. 

These are given out among those who re 
celved the anarchist literature, and cools tbe 
temper of the mob. Smith la angered by this 
and locks David in a room. He escapes, 
though, and learns that Yolanda has gone 
to kill Judge Norton. He goes after her, pur- 
sued by Smith, but arrives just In time to 
throw tbe bomb held by Yolanda in an op- 
posite direction. Smltb comes np Just then 
and wounds David with a bullet. But the 
bomb explodes, killing Smith. A few davs 
later, when David Is recovering, Yolanda 
sees the light and all ends well. 
Box Office Value 

Run. 



Evangeline Miriam Cooper 

Gabriel . Albert Koscoe 

Benedict BeUefontaine Spottiswcode Aitken 

Basil .James M area* 

Father Peleoian Paul Weigel 

Story — Dramatic. Adapted from Longfel- 
low's "Evangeline." Directed by R. A. Walsh. 
Photography by J. D. Jennings. Featuring 
Miriam Cooper and Albert Boscoe. 

Remarks 

In producing "Evangeline" the Fox organi- 
zation has scored a triumph. Tbe story, 
which is the famous poem itself, follows the 
theme and puts the scene of action as the 
poet himself would have desired it. A brief 
prolougue and epilogue are put In before and 
after the actual story. 

The prologue shows a lover's quarrel, and 
of how they are about to break their engage- 
ment. The girl's father, seeing the trouble, 
reads tbem the story of "Evangeline." Then 
follows the picture scenes In Arcady and the 
tale of the love of Evangeline and Gabriel, 
known to every .school boy. Their separation 
and the many trials through which they went 
before .they met again when they were old 
are produced in a manner that Is Interesting 
from start to finish 

The cast especially Miriam Cooper, is ex- 
cellent. 

The epilogue shaws the manner in which 
tbe lovers make up after hearing the poem. 
The film is one that should appeal to any 
audience. 

Box Office Value 

Bun. 



TO MAKE COMEDIES 

Holly-wood, Cai, August 30. — Gaiety 
Comedies, Inc., is a new company formed 
here to make light faxcial comedies. 
George Ovey is the chief comedian. Craig 
Hutchinson, formerly film editor for Mack 
Sennett, and Lehrman Nestor, director 
of Lyon and Moran comedies, are with 
the new concern. James demons is studio 
business manager and E. H. Emmick, 
president of the Peerless Film Service and 
J. L. Friedman, of the Celebrated Flayers 
Film Corporation, are executives. 



-"THE GRIM GAME" 

Paramount. Five Reds. 
Cast 

Harry Hanford Harry Houdini 

Cameron fftoa. Jefferson 

Mary Cameron -. Ann Forrest 

- Clifton Allison Augustus Phillips 

Richard Raver Tully Marshall 

Dr. Harvey Tyson Arthur Hoyt 

Ethel -. Mae Buech 

Police Reporter ...Ed. Martin 

Story — Dramatic, with sensational elements. 
Written by Authur B. Reeve and John W. 
Grey. Features Houdini, escape artist. Di- 
rected by Irwin Wfllat for Paramount Art- 
craft. 

R?marks 
The story Is that of a reporter named Han- 
ford who works on a paper bis uncle Is financ- 
ing. The uncle refuses to give further credit, 
and Hanford proposes a scheme by which the 
old man will be spirited away, and he, Han- 
ford, will be blamed for the murder. At tbe 
trial, the scheme la to be unmasked, and his 
paper Is to have a beat on the sensational 
story. Tbe three men who are to put the 
scheme through, however, take advantage of 
it .to further their own ends, with the result 
that a murder is actually committed. 

Hanford la then arrested and confined, but 
manages to escape from - a lunatic asylum, 
and from various other places. In the end 
he brings the real culprit to Justice with the 
usual happy ending. ' 

Houdini proves himself a genuine thrill 
star in this film. In the Tn^iring of the pic- 
ture be undoubtedly risked his life many 
times. Tbe picture Is a sure-fire money get- 
ter, and in places where they like to be 
thrilled will be booked over and over again. 

The main purpose of its producer Is to pro- 
vide real thrills, and they succeed admirably. 
In watching the unfolding of tbe picture, tbe 
picture fan will forget to look for a plot, or 
for dramatic themes. He will not be bothered 
about the possibilities or tbe probabilities ot 
the Incidents occurring, his whole attention 
being foenssed in drinking In all of tbe thrills, 
genuine and breath taking, that follow in 
rapid succession. , 

Box OSes Value 
Full run. 



"PENROD" RIGHTS SOLD 

DeWitt Newing, of the Century Play 
Company, has sold the moving picture 
rights of the "Peurod" stories to Marshall 
Neilan Productions, for a gum close to 
$25,000. 



MOLLY KING TO START NEW FILM 

"Women— Men Forget" Is the title of a 
picture which Molly King will begin next 
week at the Studio of the American 
Cinema Corporation at Long Island next 
week. It will be her second screen ap- 
pearance for the American. John M. 
Stahl will direct her in it and, appearing 
in the supporting cast will be Frank Mill? 
and Gretchen Hartman. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



E.F. 



JLJL 



P. F. PROCTOR 



B. F. Keith 
Vaudeville Exchange 






Nm T or*) 

B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 



Dlmt by 



S.K. 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX. President 

IN W« t 4wtk St, Nnr York 
JACK W. LOEB 

EDG AR AL LEN 

13 to «. m by 



Attention Vaude ville Acts 

John Quigley Theatrical Agency, Inc. 



Short 



Agency. VngaioTilla 
1M Boylacon St, 



ALLEN 
SPENCER 

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JOE BROWNING 



KEITH'S, BOSTON, 
THIS WEEK (Au«. 25) 




.*'•. •.-•.! r 



An actor-author who was able to 
write a successful act for himself — 
"A TIMELY SERMON." 



m 



A Few of the Successful Acts I have written: 

MORRIS and CAMPBELL 

j "TheAv-I-a-tbr" 

CHISHOLM and BREEN 

'The Cave Man." 

|Sg -. - , .. .. .*. 

LANGFORD and FREDERICKS 

"Shopping" 

MANN and MALLORY 

"Henpecko" 

WEBER and ELLIOT 

"Two Great Lovers" 

AL. LAVAN and CO. 

"Public Service" 

HART and HELENE 

'Antiques*' 

LEW WELCH and CO. 

"The Prodigal Father" 

and LYMAN 

and ROM AINE 

SEVERAL "GIRL ACTS" 

Produced by 

HERMAN BECKER 






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EXCLUSIVE MATERIAL, THAT HITS. 

For appointment, Address JOE BROWNING, Room 1102 Palace Building 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 



5QNGSTW57AND THE ACID TEST- 
THE AUDIENCE TEST ! 



WHEN TO 

i SO WHY DO 



Stern 



: TO GET ACROSS ■ - 



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CoprrUhted. WH.sad .mMiahed «U, by U. CUm^t Corpsrsdon, 1 604 Bro.d.. T , N>, York. Entered at the Port-gee «t New York. June 2*. 1879. as s«cosd<lasi nail matter node- Act of Itod i. lSTt. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 18S3 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 10, 1919 



VOLUME LXVU-No. 31 
Price. Tea Cents. S4.00 « Year 



ii 



"EXPECT 
CLEAN-UP ON 

BIG PARADE 

CORRAL STH AVENUE SEATS 



Made desperate by their heavy losses 
during the actors' strike, a group of the 
better known ticket brokers have plunged 
to the extent of $76,000 on the parade in 
honor, of General "Pershing, in an effort 
to reoeupvpartof the money they lost. 

(Military, parades at this time are' risky 
Ventures for ticket brokers to invest in. 
This is admitted by the more frank among 
those who have put their money into 
grand. stands. Still, having been driven al- 
most frantic by the nnproductivity of their 
expense-laden business during the last four 
weeks and more, they fumed to the 
parade eagerly. 

The result is. that seven brokers have 
built 1 stands along Fifth avenue, the total 
•eating, capacity amounting to 13,821,- or 
approximately 15,006 seats, as they figure 
it The brokers are Dave Marks (United 
Ticket' Office), who, with three others, 
Tyson and Brother, Alexander Ticket 
Office and Jacobs' Ticket Office, controls 
6,000 seats, extending along Fifth avenue 
at BSth, 07th, 08th and 09th streets; 
Tyson .and Company , whose stand la at 
81st street, and contains 1,621; Tyson 
Company; with 2,400 seats at 06th street, 
and' MeB ride's, with 3,000 seats between 
103d and 104th streets. 

The brokers figure. that the cost of each 
seat to them is approximately $5, for, be- 
sides paying a large rental .price for. the 
various grand stand: sites, the construction 
coats have been terrific. -That is .why they 
have fixed the prices of seats at $6, 7 and 
110, the price for each being exclusive of 
the. war tax. 

. The' average price for seats will be 
about $6.50, at which price, if the venture 
proves a sell-out, they will gather in an 
approximate total of $100,000, or $97,500, 
to. be exact., And when the amount of 
their investment is considered, to which 
must be added at least $10,000 more, for 
miscellaneous overhead charges, it be- 
comes quite apparent that they have taken 
a desperate, chance to earn the $1,000 or 
more dollars each that they will earn if 
the venture proves a success. 

To insure success the -brokers have ex- 
pended' large sums' in advertising in. the 
dailies. and elsewhere. In spite of this, 
late last week and even early this week 
they, were far from sanguine about their 
profit* on the parade, one of them' re- 
marking that, "I'd much rather have 'my 
money stuck in some show — there at least 
I've got a chance." .'. 

B. S. MOSS' HAMILTON OPENS ' 

B. S. Moss' Hamilton opened its doors 
last Sunday with the new Famous Player*. 
Lasky Program. The house, hat been com- 
pletely re-decorated and 4s under the per- 
sonal management of William Ray nor, as- 
sisted, by Jack Lereaux. The, openleg. pro- 
gram, consisted of a Wallace- Reid feature, 
topics- jQf , the. day r Newa.. Weekly,, two 
comedies and - an . array, ; of talent: Including, 
Roy King, . Tenor, the Thamara Season* 
Ballet and a Banjo Duet' ' 



BETTY BROWN WANTS A DIVORCE 

Betty Brown, one of Flo Ziegf eld's most 
pulchritudinous show girls in the "Frolic" 
shows, but who says she is through with 
the, stage,, having quit the. "Frolic" when 
.the strike caused it to close, is also mak- 
ing an effort to rid herself of her husband, 
Leslie J. Casey, whom she married Janu- 
ary. 8, 1918. 

This became known last week when, 
through her attorney, Harry Saks Hech- 
heimer, she filed a suit for absolute divorce 
in the Supreme Court, the action being 
based - on the, only grounds on which a 
divorce may be granted in this state — 
adultery. 

The papers thus far filed in the auit fail 
to reveal the .name of the women with 
whom. Casey is alleged to have miscon- 
ducted himself. And when inquiry, was of 
Casey h'"w«Jf early this week he- replied 
"Which onet — there were five or six." The 
only thing Miss Brown would say about 
her was "that she is rich and charming, 
and I know her very well. That is why I 
am not going to tell anybody her namet" 

The Caaeys' marital differences began 
last New Year's day, when, . following a 
row they had. over her failure to. come 
home immediately after the "Frolic" shows 
were over to entertain guests they had in- 
vited to. a New Year's Eve party, Betty 
Brown left her husband's bed and board, 
as such things are described in legal 
notices, and went to live with her friend, 
Dorothy. Klewer in- a hotel on West Fifty- 
sixth street. So far as could be learned, 
they failed to become reconciled since their 
parting last New Year's Day, although 
their. friends know that they have been on 
speaking terms since then. 



EQUITY, WINNING STRIKE 

MUST NOW FIG HT FIDEUTY 

Latter League b Making Active Campaign for Members and 

Shares Fruit* of Equity Victory, While A. E. A. 

Association Lacks Harmony. 



SELWYNS TRY OUT PIECE 
• Boston, Sept 5.— Selwyn and Com- 
pany have opened a new production here 
at the Arlington Theatre with the Craig 
Players. "Prisoner of the World," la the 
title of the new play, written by Margaret 
Mayo and Henry Forman. In as much 
as the hew production is in its second 
week here, and is drawing capacity houses 
every performance, it looks pretty good. 
The title applies to the ex-kaiser, who, 
throughout the performance , is known as 
"Willie the Hun." Allied with the Coun- 
tess Ricei, a former favorite of the de- 
throned monarch, an American corres- 
pondent and a British secret service agent 
unite in a plan to capture the former Em- 
peror. Through the efforts of the countess 
he is enticed from a neutral country into 
a hostile one. Here, in a' secluded chateau, 
when his capture seems certain, he es- 
capes. The manner in which he is enabled 
to- do this provides the high lights of ex- 
citement and suspense in the play. 



CONDITIONS BAD IN ANTIPODES 

. According, to a letter received by Clara 
.Rose,, secretary to Willie Edclsten, from 
Hugh. D. Mcintosh, head of the Tivoli 
Theatres, Australia, the houses in Sidney 
are having a tough break. The business 
was Just recovering from an epidemic of 
Spanish Influenza, which caused a big 
drop in receipts, when a seamen's strike 
was declared. According to Mr. Mcintosh, 
"the strike will last for -a long time and, 
indirectly, 'will affect ■ the theatrical busi- 
ness' as long as it lasts. 

HAD $1,200 HOUSE 
.'TleTelatlons,'of.'a',Wlfe, ,, ;a George. Gatt 
attraction, played, .to. a $1,2000 house in 
Peoria, I1L, last week. . This is a record 
performance for this production'. 



With the actor's strike settled and with 
theatres fast reopening on Broadway, 
plans, have been put into motion to in- 
sure permanency to and to strengthen the 
Actors' Fidelity League. Wiseacres are 
of the opinion that this movement is but 
the beginning of a struggle between the 
Fidelity and the Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion,' and that the Fidelity's campaign for 
expansion and a larger membership has 
been launched with the purpose of entic- 
ing members of the Equity into the fold 
of Fidelity, with the ultimate view of 
gobbling up the Equity. 

What might be considered a Fidelity 
war council met on Monday afternoon at 
the League's headquarters "to assure the 
permanency of the organization upon a 
firm and sound basis." George M. Cohan, 
president of the League, announced his 
Intention of devoting his entire time to 
its' affairs upon returning from a two 
weeks' vacation. 

The league also held an open meeting 
yesterday in the ballroom of the Hotel' 
Astor and registered a marked increase in 
membership, which is but the beginning of 
a membership campaign with which 
Equity will have to cope. Although the 
League is not making propaganda of the 
matter, the faet remains that, in the 
terms of the theatrical peace, Fidelity 
gained as much as Equity. Everything 
that was granted the Equity has been 
granted Fidelity, while, on the other hand, 
the latter' has not incurred the bitterness 
of the managers.' And several liberal con- 
cessions granted to Equity had' their birth 
in the Cohan-Fidelity contract. 

A new membership committee has been 
appointed for the Fidelity, consisting of 
Howard Kyle, Frederick Karr, Jose Rubin, 
Lowell Sherman and Lester Lonergan. 

This committee can offer to new mem- 
bers a contract as liberal as the one that 
the Equity lias wrested from the man- 
agers. It is thought that this argument 
will have a weighty appeal to the actor 
who is looking for a job. 

In connection with jobs, the League has 
established an employment bureau where, 
at all times, there can be obtained infor- 
mation as to places wher employment is 
available, the type of persons desired for 
the play and any other data essential to 
procuring engagements. This bureau has 
already placed several hundred artists 
in positions. 

A record is kept of all those who reg- 
ister. It contains a brief outline of their 
previous experience, their adaptability to 
play type, their appearance and other mls- 
ceifaneons detail which makes it easy to 
'select .the right person for a part and does 
away with sending scores of applicants 
upon a wild goose chase. .. 

Through an ' emergency . relief fund, 

many members, of Fidelity who -were 

thrown, out of work. as a result of the 

'strike, were aided materially. The fund 

has been dispensed with since peace has 

been declared. ■ . il, .,". ^r 

'" To establish a permanent fund far the 

League, a benefit performance will be 



given .under its auspices at the Century 
Theatre on Sunday evening, September 21. 
The entertainment committee In charge of 
the benefit consists of William Collier, 
George Cohan and Holbrook Blinn. Tan 
per cent of the receipts will be donated, 
to the Actors' Fund of America, and, 
after the performance, the League hopes 
to have enough in its coffers to be firmly 
established upon its feet. -"V 

Among- those who have been selected to 
appear at the benefit, besides,- George M. 
Cohan and Willie Collier, who are to 
present a one-set travesty - especially 
written for the occasion, are Mrs. Minnie 
Madden Fiske, Julia Arthur, David War- 
field, Margaret Anglln, Louis Mann, Fay 
Bainter, Frances Starr, Janet Beecher, 
Olive Wynham, Marjorie Wood, Bessie 
McCoy Davis, George MseFarlane, Ralph 
Hen, Justine Johnstone, Blanche Bates, 
Nora Bayes, Ina Claire, Patricia Colling*, 
Florence Nash, Mary Nash, Sally Ann 
WeUman, Maurice, Mary Ryan, Valll 
Valli, Lowell, Sherman, Allan EHnehart, 
W. II. aOmore, John HaUidey, Effingham 
Pinto, Leonor Dlric, Otis Skinner, Joes) 
Rubin, Ann Pennington, Gladys Hansen, 
Holbrook Blinn, Arthur Ashley, Thos. B. 
Shea, Lester Lonergan, Amelia Bingham, 
Ruth Chatterton, Grace George, Alexander 
Oarr, Edna Wallace Hopper, Carlotta 
Monterey, Josephine Drake, De Lyle Aids, 
Grace Fisher, Eugene Cowlee, Burr Mc- 
intosh and Lionel Brabam. Alexander 
Leftwich will be general stage director. 

Meanwhile, the Equity has been busy 
maintaining harmony among Its members. 
Although the victory is ostensibly theirs, 
there are many in the organisation whs 
would have preferred a closed shop, which 
would have meant the elimination of 
Fidelity. There are also those who object 
to an agreement such as the one accepted. 
Much surprise has also been manifested 
over the fact, that a "status quo" condi- 
tion does not prevail now that the strike Is 
ended. 

No copy of the terms of agreement was 
made public until Monday morning, when 
Attorney W. B. Rubin read the contract 
at Equity headquarters after a large 
number of members .had severely criticised 
the Equity officials for keeping matters 
so secretive. At the mass-meeting on 
Sunday, the terms had only been generally 
aliided to and there had been much dis- 
satisfaction. A cloudiness seemed to exist 
over several points in the agreement and 
indications pointed to a busy hoard of 
arbitration in keeping thetrical pesos. 

The terms, as tin ally agreed upon, are 
almost Identical to those that had been 
offered by the managers to the ' Equity 
earlier in the week, sad which had met 
with' flat-footed rejection of the strikers. 

"I« there any difference between the 
final agrement and the one the Equity 
spurned some days agor" Pan} Turner, 
attorney for the Equity, was asked by a 
-Clipper reporter. -. 

"There is a Utile difference," was- the 



(Continued on pagtt 33 and 34.) . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 



WITH STRIKE ENDED, PLAYS 
ARE SPEED ED FOR PRODUCTION 

All Managers Hurry Casts Together and Start Rehearsals of 
New and Road Companies in Effort to Make ! 
Up Lost Time. 



With the news that the actora' strike 
bad been settled managers started mobiliz- 
ing their casts on Saturday so aa to get 
companies to work aa soon as possible. 

Adolph Klanber had his cast on the 
phone as early as seven-thirty Saturday 
morning, with the result that all the mem- 
bers of the "Nightie Night" company were 
busy rehearsing again by Saturday eve- 
ning. • ■ 

Charles Emerson Cook's "A Regular Fel- 
ler," was in rehearsal on Sunday. Nor' 
had the excitement of the strike made the 
players forget their lines, for, according to 
Cook, the rehearsal sounded like a regu- 
lar performance. The play waa announced 
early in August but nevered opened in 
New Tort Among' those in the cast are 
- Ernest Glendenning, James ; Bradbury, 
Everett Butterneld, Edwin Holt, Boy Gor- 
don, Charles Abbott, Dudley Clements, Al- 
bert Buahee, George Cuker, Miriam Sears, 
Margaret Greene, Charlotte Granville and 
Kittle O'Connor. 

"An Innocent Idea, which may be pro- 
dused under the title of "The Bed Con- 
vention," is another Cook production 
which will soon resume reh e a r s al s. Book- 
ings in Washington and Baltimore came 
to naught because of the strike, and there 
may now be several weeks delay before 
rehearsals upon it are commenced again. 

Cook is also about to .put a Florence 
Nash show, as yet unnamed, into rehear- 
sal, while "A Woman's Woman," Mrs. 
Louis De Foe's dramatisation of a Satur- 
day Evening Post story,, will start re 
hfiarsals as soon as Euima Dona returns 
from her, vacation at Mflford. . 

"Up From Nowhere," a Booth Tarking- 
. ton-Harry Leon Wilson comedy which was 
originally set to open .on September 1, also 
started rehearsing again. The play is 
presented by John D. Williams, and the 
chief role is taken by Norman Trevor. 

Rehearsals have also begun for "Hello 
Alexander" in which the Shuberts will 
present Mclntyre and Heath. 

John Cort called three companies for 
rehearsal on Monday. "Fiddlers Three," 
the comic opera in which. Tavic Beige 
continues as the featured player, will open 
the new season in Providence on Sept. 29 ; 
"Glorianna," starring Fritzie Scheff, makes 
its 1910-20 debut' in Detroit on October 
S; and "Flo Flo," with Handera and Mfl- 
11a, will be produced in Cincinnati on Oc- 
tober 5. 

"Friendly Enemies," -with Louis Mann 
in the stellar role will open an engagement 
of four .weeks at the Manhattan Opera 
House tonight. Associated in the com- 
pany - with Mann are Jesse Dandy, Felix 
Kremb, Richard Barbee, Marie Reielardt, 
Ethel Barney and MarceUe Nelken. 

Rehearsals have already been resumed 
of the following A. H. Woods productions : 
"Too Many Husbands," "The Honorable 
Sam Davis," "The Girl in the limousine," 
■The Woman in Room 13," "Up in Mabel's 
Room," "Under Orders," "Roads of Des- 
tiny, w "The Big Chance," "Business Be- 
fore Pleasure" and "Parlor, Bedroom and 
Bath.? 

•Too Many Husbands" is the new com- 
edy by W. Somerset Mangham, in which 
Kenneth Douglas, Bstelle Winwood and 
Lawrence Groesmith will 'have the princi- 
pal roles. It win shortly be presented In 
New York at a theatre to be announced 
later: ... • •,.... ^ .. . 

"The Honorable Sam Davis" is a new 
comedy in three acts' by Montague Grass 
and Julea Eckert Goodman, in which Bar- 
ney Bernard will nan the stellar role. It 
wfll be presented in New York about tile 
middle of next month. 



"The Girl in the Limousine," is a new 
farce by Wilson CoUison and Avery Hop- 
wood, in which John Cumberland, Doris 
Kenyon, Charles Buggies and Zelda Sears 
will play in the principal roles. It win be 
presented in New York about the latter 
part of the month at a theatre to be an- . 
nouneed later. 

"The Woman in Boom 13" will open 
in Baltimore on . September 15. It win 
be followed a week later by "The Big 
Chance" with Mary Nash in the stellar 
role. Florence Beed in "Roads of Des- 
tiny" wfll begin her season in Newark on 
September IS. 

. It is expected that within the next two 
weeks thirty companies of . old and new 
productions wfll be under way. 

Cohan and Harris activities out of town 
wfll soon be in full swing again. Mrs. 
Fiske opens jn "Mis' Nell of N'Orlcang" 
at the ApoUo- Theatre, Atlantic City, on 
September 18th. The western company of 
"A Prince There Was" opens at Denver 
on September 21st- The eastern company 
of "Going Dp" opens at Columbus', Ohio, 
on the 22nd and the western company at 
Hamilton, Ohio, on the 21st. On Sep- 
tember 18th, "Three Faces East" opens at 
Wilmington, Delaware, "A. Tailor. Made 
Man" begins its road tour at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, on the 21st. Grant Mitchell, in "A 
Prince There Was," wfll open an engage- 
ment at the Standard Theatre, New York, 
on September 15th. , , 

The first company of Richard Warton 
Tuiiy's "Bird of Paradise" opens it season 
in Cleveland on September 15th. The 
other "Bird of Paradise" company. wiU 
tour the New England states, and, al- 
though the opening date haa not been defi- 
nitely set, it wfll be somewhere in the 
middle of September. - - 

."The MaBquerader," another Tufly pro- 
duction, has been resting for the summer 
near San Francisco, and wfll start its sea- 
son there with an engagement commencing 
September 14th. 

Smith and Golden's "Thunder," hereto- 
fore . advertised as "Sunset," will open in 
two weeks at the Criterion .here. Other 
. shows are to be quickly put in preparation. 

The David Belasco activities are numer- 
ous. "The Gold Diggers," with Ina Claire, 
opens at the Lyceum, New York, on Sep- 
tember 30th. David Warfield will soon 
go on tour again in "The Auctioneer." 
"Tiger 1 Tiger!" and Tiger Rose" win both 
be on the road by the end of the month. 
"Dark Rosaleen" is scheduled to open in 
New Ygrk sometime . next month and then 
go on tour. "The Boomerang" will short- 
lytake to the road again. After the Ina 
Claire play is successfully launched, 
Belasco wfll turn his attention toward get- 
ting a suitable vehicle for Lenore Ulric. 
"Daddies" wfll hit the road in four or five 
weeks. 

Avery Hop wood is producing for the first 
time at the Garrick Theatre in Washing- 
ton ' next week his newest farce, "Ev'ry 
Little Movement." Earle Foxe wfll be 
seen in the leading male role, while others 
in the new Hop wood farce are Donald 
MacDonald, Lucille Manion, Doris Sherin, 
William H. Pringle, John M. Klein, Lur- 
leen Garrison, Gladys Knoor, Grace 
Louise Anderson and Augustin Glassmire. 

Gus Edwards is recruiting his cast for 
"The Film Girl." Eva Esmond, a child 
actress who haa. played with Margaret 
niington, Margaret Wycherly and Alice 
Brady, has been engaged for a dramatic 
role, while Katherine Quinlan, a well 
known Chattanqua soprano, has' also 
signed a contract. Others engaged for 
"The Fflm Girl" include Lois. Scott, an 
ingenue who has just finished a year's 
contract ' with Fox Ffl ms ' and Lucille 
Moore, recruited from, vaudeville,, where 
she has been appearing with her brother 
and sister. 



HOW DUDLEY GOT THAT EYE 

New light was cast' last week on the 
raven-colored fringe which recently sur- 
rounded the. right optic' of the Loehinvar; 
among the booking agents, Edgar Dudley, 
when the records of the West 100th Street ' 
police station were, examined. Briefly,; the 
facts are as follows : 

The evening Dudley acquired his beauty 
mark, there were grouped- around a table 
in the Little Club, four young people. 
. They were Gladys Jordan. - and - Lenora 
Barron, of the "Mdinight Frolic," and 
George Gates Jr., son of a wealthy Western 
lumber merchant, and J. B. Farrell, son of 
a Western railroad official. Both boys 
graduated from high school last June and 
are matriculating at Yale. 

Shortly after eleven o'clock, Dudley came 
into the Little Club, looked around, and 
noticed (for at this time both of his eyes . 
were .still functioning normally) the; quar- 
tette above mentioned and • strode over' to 
their table, "sort of sociable like," as the 
Western boys explained. Leaning over, he 
whispered to one of the girls. His 'words 
are not a matter of public record, but this 
much is certain; they caused Miss Barron 
to announce that herself and Miss Jordan 
had a previous engagement with Dudley 
for that evening and that it ■ was, there- 
fore, obligatory on their part to permit 
Dudley to drive them home in his car and 
wouldn't the boys kindly excuse their 
rather abrupt leave taking, and so forth 
and so on. It also appears that Miss 
Jordan was not aware of the "previous 
engagement", with Dudley, for she voiced 
her disapproval, bat, since she had arr- 
anged to spend the night at Miss Bar- 
ron's home on West 107th Street, she felt 
it incumbent on her, . as she explained, to 
accompany 'her 'friend and Dudley. 

So the girls left with Dudley and the 
boys went home. But the boys didn't stay 
home long that evening. Shortly after 
la. m., they left the home of Young 
Gates- at 330 West 102nd Street and went 
up to 220 West 107th Street, the latter 
address being the apartment house in which 
one of the girls lives. There they took up 
their vigil, waiting until 3:15 a. m., when 
Dudley, in his car with the girls, hove 
into view. 

Dudley saw the boys waiting there but 
drove the car upto the curb in front of the 
house and there all the occupants, includ- 
ing a gentleman friend of Dudley, alighted. 

Both the boys strode forward. - They 
came very close to Dudley — too close, in 
fact, to suit tile, young booking man*. 
There were heard some strange, sounds. 
"Biff!" waa one of them and "bang!" an- 
other. Farrell had hit the "kidnapper" as 
he calls Dudley, on the jaw, and Gates had 
added to the punishment by smiting . him 
over the right eye. Followed shouts, Dud- 
ley said to have been doing most of it, and 
there appeared the blue coated minions of 
the law. ■. M 

"Arrest that man" quoth Dudley, point- 
ing toward Gates, who was arrested and 
taken to the West 100th Street Police 
Station. Dudley charged him with simple 
assault and, in default of bail, Gates was 
held over ' until nine o'clock that same 
morning in the station house. He was 
then arraigned in the West Fifty-fourth 
Street Magistrate's Court, where, upon the 
failure of Dudley to appear and press the 
charge. Magistrate Sweetzer, upon the. ap- 
plication of Harry Saks Hecbheimer, who 
represented Dudley, dismissed the case 
against young . Gates. :.'••; 

Early this week, Miss Barron stated that 

Dndley had promised to let her drive his 

car that .night, which was the principal 

'reason why they left the boys and went 

"for a Httie ride." 

The eye* have it. 



; "SPEC'S* ARE HMED 

All of the ticket brokers, with the ex- 
. ception of Tyson Company and John Ma- 
honey, who were arrested by Internal Rev- 
enue Agents July 12 last charged with 
failing to stamp the price at which they 
sold tickets on each pasteboard,, pleaded 
guilty sb charged last week in the crimi- 
nal' branch of the United' States District 
Court and were fined $10' each by Judge 
Foster.. . 

The brokers fined are Leo Newman, 
Alex Jones, . Charles 'Levy, Joe Newman, 
Matty Moscowits, David A. Warfield and 
Louis Cohen. They were prosecuted by 
Assistant District Attorney George W. 
Taylor and Louis Marshall appeared as 
attorney for most of them. •;•• ' 

The case; against Tyson- Company and 
John Mahoney was set for Thursday of 
this week,'] it being said by the District 
Attorney's office ' that they will probably 
withdraw, their plea of not ; guilty and 
plead guilty instead, in which event Judge 
Foster will probably impose the same pen- 
alty that he meted out to the other 
brokers. 



CORT PLAYING AGAINST SELF 

Baltimore, Md., Sept. 8. — John Cort 
wfll furnish his own opposition here to- 
night when he opens two attractions simul- 
taneously. At the Ford theatre, "Holey 
Boley Eyes" with Eddie Leonard. will have 
ifs premiere, and at the Academy "Just 
A Minute'-' wfll be given it's first perform- 
ance. 



MADDOCK SETS OPENING 
C. B. ; Maddock's. musical production, 
"Nothing But Love," featuring Andrew 
Toombs, wiU open on Thursday, Sept. 11, 
at the Broad Street Theatre in Newark. 
The. piece was originally scheduled to open 
in AUentown, but was cancelled by the 
calling off of rehearsals on account of the 
strike. ■ *'• .'■.■'' 



KELLARD OPENS THE 18TH 

. John . E. Ke liar d will not - open hii 
season in' San. Francisco, 'as planned, but 
win begin' it in Salt Lake City on Sep- 
tember 18. He will play Tuunlet," 
"Merchant of Venice," "Othello" and 
"Macbeth," in addition to several high- 
class modern plays. 

ST. DENIS DANCERS IN PLAY 

San Jose, Cai.., Sept. 8. — The Ruth St. 

Denis dancers participated in a forest play 
called "The Soul of Sequoia," produced 
here Saturday night The play is by Don 
E. Richards. In the cast were Charles 
Kellog, Margaret Harvey, Phoebe Lorraine, 
Harvey and Olga Braslan. 



FINE FOR FAGAN 

Barney Fagan was showing Ms friends 
recently two pieces of paper, each of which 
he prized most highly. One was a check 
for $500, the other a letter wishing him 
all kinds of happiness and prosperity- 
Each bore the same signature, E. F. Albee. 



OLYMPIC PLANS ALTERATIONS 

Plans are under way to raise the seat- 
ing capacity of the Olympic Theatre, 
Brooklyn, to 2,500 and to build a new 
entrance facing Fulton street Work will 
begin next week. 



NEW CAFE REVUE OPENS 

Joe Ward, who runs the "Orange 
Grove" restaurant and cafe at 869 Long- 
wood avenue, The Bronx, .has opened a 
new revue called. "Jazz land," with a cast 
of twenty -people. The elow was written 
by Sam Ward, and .Ray Perez put it on. 
In the cut are Frankie Marvin, Hamley 
Sisters. Marjorie Dr< bin, -Marie Weaver, 
Jack White, Trixie Warren, and Joe Ward, 
together with a chorus of ten. 



STELLA MORRISEY 

Stella Morrisey, whose picture is on the 
cover of this week's issue of the Clipper, 
is the prima donna of Chas. M. Baker's 
"Sweet Sweetie Girls'* Company, playing 
the American Burlesque Circuit She is 
considered one of the leading prima donnas 
of burlesque, and is, without a doubt, the 
handsomest gowned woman in this branch 
of theatricals. 

'Miss Morrisey makes a change of seven 
costumes during the performance, a spe- 
cial head piece being worn with each gown. 
Her wardrobe this season was made by * 
well known New York costumer and cost 
$2,100, the highest amount,, it is claimed, 
ever paid by any woman in burlesque for s 
wardrobe. This is Miss Morrisey 'a second 
season under the management of Chas. M. 
Baker. She is appearing this week: with 
her company at th* Star Theatre, Brook- 
lyn. 



September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



DEPOSITIONS SAY GALLI-CURCI'S 
HUSBAND WAS SOME LOTHARIO 



Papers, Filed in Chicago, Set Forth Details of Auto Trips with 
.Girls on Which Singer Hopes to 
•*■ Get Divorce 



■mUS 



Chicago, 111., Sept 8.— Interesting tes- 
timony has come to light in the battle 
twixt Gnlli Curd, the opera star, and her 
husband, Luigi Curci, for a severance of 
marital ties. A hearing held this week was 
enlivened by a number of depositions ob- 
tained from people in the village of Fleiseh- 
mann, N. i'., where the pair lived during 
the summer of 1917. The depositions were 
filed in, the Superior Court and were read 
as testimony against the defendant. 

Stories told by the town barber, cobbler, 
butcher, grain merchant, real estate owner, 
etc, indicate that while Luigi Curci and . 
his brother, Gennaro, were inhabitants of 
the village, they were a gay ' pair of 
Lotharios. All of the depositions tell of 
th- witnesses seeing Curci, his brother, and 
Melissa Brown, named as co-respondent, 
together, and also of seeing the brothers in 
company with various unknown women at 
hotels, etc. j During this time, Mme. Galli- 
Curd was away. 

Some of the testimony in the case was 
as follows and began when Attorney Rath- 
bun began questioning Alonzo > Van Bru- 
ner, a resident of Fleiscnmanns. ' 

"Did you ever know a girl by the name 
of 'Melissa Brown?" he was asked. 

"Yes, sir, she lived in this community," 
he replied. • • • 

. Q. — Did you ever see her in the company 
or presence of Luigi Card? A — Yes, sir ; 
about two years ago, on the back porch of 
the Vermelya house. 

Q. The house where the Curds were liv- 
ing in 1917? A. — Yes. I came out of the 
garden, which is in the rear of the Ver- 
melya house. I saw this man (indicating 
the defendant, Luigi Curci) and this Melis- 
sa Brown on the back porch of Vermelya's 
house. 

A deposition made by the Brown girl 
herself was then presented. It was made 
in Chicago on June 24 and starts by de- 
scribing an auto ride that she and her 
cousin, named Mary Hinaldo, took with the 
two brothers. 

Q. How long did you drive on the first 
occasion? A About forty-five minutes. 

Q. AH right; what, if anything, did yon 
do then? A. We stopped in a londy place 
in the road. 

Q. Where were you sitting in the car? 
A In the front seat. 
Q. With whom? . A. With Luigi. 
Q. What, if liny thing, happened then? 
A. Why, we were talking and loving a bit. 
Q. What did Luigi Curci do, if anything, 
then? A. Why, he put his arms around me 
and hugged me and kissed me. 

Q. What happened next, if anything, 
Mias Brown? A My cousin and Gennaria 
got out of the car and went for a walk. 
Q. Where? A In the woods. 
Q. All right ; what did you do then, if 
anything? A Luigi asked me if I would 
mind getting in the back of the car, and I 
said I would not. 

Q. Did you go into the rear seat of the 
ca? A Yes, 

Q. Did he stay there with you? A He 
did. • '- ' 

Q. All right; what did he do there, if 
anything? A He loved me some more. 
Q. What else? A. He kissed me. 
After completing the story of the road- 
side rendezvous, Miss Brown told of two 
more evening rides to the same spot. On 
the fourth night, she testified, the same 
foursome visited the house where the Garcia 
lived. 

Q. How long did yon stay there? A 
Oh, about a half hoar. 

Q. What happened, if anything? A Oh, 
we were talking and loving a little. 

Q. Want do you mean by loving? . ■ A 
Well, he put hia. arms around me and 
based* me. 

The testimony of two young girls was 
tnen presented and was as foUowa: &; 
Q. Did you ever see Luigi Curd, who 

■ .:' "• ' •' • '■'\-: : ■ ' 



sits by the wall there. A Yea, air. .' 

Q. Where did you see him first? A. I 
saw him the first year they were here. 

Q. Did they ever apeak to yon? A. Yes, 
sir. 

Q. Where did they first speak to you? 
A. In 1917 my sister and I were walking 
from the depot, and in front of Doolittle's 
feed store they asked us if we would take 
a ride, and we started to run. 
' Q. What is your sister's name? A. 
Marjorle. 

Q. How old is she? A Fifteen. 

Harry Sammet, attorney for the defend- 
ant, asked: 

"How old were you in 1917?" 

"Sixteen." 

Q. Did you go to school? A. No, sir. 

Q. Is it not a fact that when you came 
along they asked you if you were going to 
town, and if you would not go along. A. 
Mo, sir. 

_ . Q. Haven't you ever accepted any one's 
invitation to ride to town. A. Yes, sir. 

Q. Do you know the names of the peo- 
ple you took the rides with? A. I only 
take a ride with people I know. 

The court will listen to arguments Sep- 
tember 16 on the motion of counsel to have 
the depositions of Melissa Brown and Mary 
Itinaldi, with whom the husband of the 
singer is alleged to have been intimate, de- 
clared incompetent testimony. 

"JUST A MINUTE" OPENING SET " 

The Knickerbocker Theatre will re-open 
on Sept. 22nd, with "Just a Minute" as the 
attraction. This will be the Now York 
premiere of the play of" which John Oort 
expects considerable. " 



THURSTON SIGNS FOR 6 WEEKS 

(Howard Thurston,' the magician; haa a 
contract with Charles B. Dillingham, by 
which he gets the use of the Globe thea- 
tre fora minimum period of six weeks with 
an option for a longer period should the 
business of the show warrant it. 

JEWISH THEATRE THRIVING 

The Jewish Art Theatre, which opened 
in the old Garden Theatre on Labor Day, 
bids fair to thrive. The first production 
there, "The Idle Inn" has proved a first- 
rate artistic success and is atracting much 
more money than was expected to the box 
office. '•'•"•, 

The Garden Theatre was leased by the 
Jewish Art Theatre, Inc., from the New 
York Life Insurance Company, the owner, 
for one year, with options thereafter cov- 
ering a period aggregating five years. The 
rental is approximatdy $800 per week. 

The theatrical plan of these Yiddish 
players is based along the same lines as 
those inaugurated by The Theatre Guild 
which produced "John Ferguson" last sea- 
son; It is a co-operative plan, the players 
receiving a fixed salary and, in addition, a 
pro-rata share of the profits. 

Emanuel Reicher has been appointed 
art director and all plays will be produced 
under his personal supervision. Samuel S. 
Grossman, formerly connected with the en- 
tertainment bureau of the Jewish Welfare 
Board, has been appointed general man- 
ager and Jack Charash is handling the 
publicity. 

"The Dumb Messiah," an historial drama 

"-."■ft a«=t» by David Pinaki win foHow 

The Idle Inn" and wfll be presented early 

next month. In this play Emanud Reicher 

win play the leading role. 

BURKAN GOING WEST 

Nathan Bnrkan, the theatrical lawyer 
iSi. 1 "*** »n Thnwday or this week tm 
California; where he plans to spend a four 
weeks' vacation resting from tie effects of 
the actors' strike, in which be played an 
important legal part. - 



"BANDITS" TO GIVE BALL 
"The Bandits," a new organisation 
composed of Theatrical and Wall Street 
men, are to give a ban about October 15th, 
under the management of Hilly Hinee. The 
affair will like tatke place at the Am- 
sterdam Opera House. 



' . ~ ii/r^M^TA* BEATEN UP 

Alfrea* Bryan,' 1 the songwriter, is" con- 
fined to his borne in a bandaged condition 
and under the' care of his physician) Dr. 
Ayre, while Detectives Maskiel and Brady 
of the West Forty-seventh Street Police 
Station, are investigating an assault 
charge he has lodged against Mike Don- 
aldson, soldier, Croix de Guerre medallist, 
and former trainer of the late Stanley 
Ketchel, the prizefighter. 

How Bryan, who wrote' the lyrics for 
the Shubert "Gaieties" and for the "Hdlo, 
Alexander" show, came by the" bandages 
which now swathe his head and face was 
revealed early this week when his son Leo 
reported the aUeged happening of last 
Sunday afternoon to the police. 

According to the Bryans, Donaldson met 
the songwriter last Sunday afternoon at 
the Hotel de France, on West Forty-ninth 
street. They were friends of several years' 
standing. A discussion arose over some 
recent happenings, not revealed, in which 
I*o Bryan and Donaldson were the prin- 
cipal participants. 

Bryan told the police that Donaldson 
and he walked out of the hotel and con- 
tinued the discussion. Finally, when they 
were a few doors west of the hotel, he 
says he told Donaldson not to bother him 
and turned suddenly to leave him when 
something flashed from Donaldson's hip- 
pocket, Bryan felt himself struck from 
behind over the head and that is all he 
remembers, he says. 

He says that an acquaintance passing by 
found him lying on the sidewalk in a 
bleeding condition, and placed him in a 
taxi which took him to the Polyclinic 
Hospital, where his wounds were dressed. 
There his son came and took him to the 
home of Mrs. Minna Wells, mother of the 
late Jack Wells, at 167 West 120th street, 
where the Bryans have been living during 
the last few months. 

The extent of Bryan's injuries as sum- 
marized by him is as follows A scalp 
wound in the back of the head which re- 
quired several stitches, a split lower Up 
which required three stitches, and a few 
minor bruises and contusions about the 
face. 

Donaldson, who haa been a guest at the 
Bryan home several times since he return- 
ed from active service at the front about 
six months ago, lived at the Hotel Somer- 
set untO the altercation with Bryan last 
Sunday. Since that time he has left the 
hotel, leaving no forwarding address. 

SUES CRESCENT OWNERS 

Frank A 8 locum, former manager of 
the Crescent Theatre, Brooklyn, haa sued 
the Realty Associates, claiming that 
there is stiU due him the snm of $460 in 
commissiona i growing out of the lease 
which he successfully negotiated whereby 
the Shubert 's, last June, took over the 
Crescent Theatre. 

The Shuberts leased the house from the 
Realty Associates, the owner, for a period 
of five years from last June, at an ag- 
gregate rental of $115,000 for the full 
term of the lease, or an average yearly 
rental of $23,000. However, after the 
negotiations were completed, the theatre's 
owner agreed to allow the Shuberta $16,- 
000, this money to be need by them for 
alteration purposes. 

In bis smt, which was filed by H. J. and 
F. E. Goldsmith, his attorneys, Slocum, a 
brother of John P. Slocum, producer of 
"The Lady in Red," claimed that be waa 
also entitled to commissions amounting 
to $450 on the $16,000 that the Realty 
Associates had permitted the Shuberts to 
deduct. 

The Realty Associates, on the other 
hand, after paying Slocum the commission 
on $100,000, about which there waa no 
contention, did contend that they did not 
have to pay- any commission on the $16,000 
which it turned back to the Shuberta. 
_However, the case was settled last week 
when Slocum accepted 5200 in payment of 
the $460 claimed by him. r»7«w» « 



JOE CAITES SIGNS KITTY GORDON 
Kitty Gordon, who, for the last few 
years, has been showing herself to motion 
picture fans exclusively, will shortly be 
seen on Broadway under the management 
of Joe Gaitea. : She "will be ■tarred in a 
musical romance called "Love for Sale." 
Jack WiUon, one of the co-authors, is to 
have the leading comedy role. The play 
waa written Jar WU1 8. Johnstone and 
Jack Wilson, witb music by Harry Archer 
and Lyrics ijf Thomas Johnstone. 



ROBBED SHOW; GOES TO JAR. 
Butland, Vt., Sept 4.— Frank H. 
Smith, a roustabout with the Joseph Dion 
Carnival Circus Shows, was sentenced to 
one year's imprisonment here for stealing 
$300 from the treasury of the show. He 
pleaded guilty before Judge Goddard in 
Rutland- City Court 



"TEN NIGHTS" OPENS 
Baltimomc Md., 8ept 6.— Robert W. 
Downing, who is appearing in "Ten Nights 
in a Barroom," opened here Monday night 
and has been doing good business all week. 
Arthur C. Alston is the manager of the 
production. In the cast are James Hen- 
derson, Nye Mclahaw, Frank Base, Arthur 
Fox, Lew Preston, Florence SedeU, Helene 
Andree and Betty Conrad. 



"LOOK WHO'S HERE" GETS OVER 

Baltimore, Md., Sept 7.— The inevit- 
able bedroom scene baa been dragged into 
musical comedy, for "Look Who's Here," 
a new farce with music now playing at 
the Academy, haa two of the four scenes 
in the last act played in a very pretty bed- 
room, with two artistically appointed twin 
beds that are occupied from time to time 
and, at other times, pnshed against the 
wall to make room for song numbers. 

The farce possesses complication npon 
complication, aided by musical bits that 
are quite melodious and linger in the mem- 
ory. "I Know and You Know," and "The 
Turk Has the Right Idea" were the most 
popular numbers, whUe "Love Haa Come 
to Stay" and "Bubbles" both possess 
"whistleable" quality. 

Cecil Lean and Oleo Mayfleld are fea- 
tured in the piece, in the respective rolea 
of a young novelist and a matrimonial ex- 
pert The novelist la ao busy injecting 
love into his novels that he apparently haa 
little or none left to bestow npon bis wife 
and it is not until a foreigner begins to 
make advances to her that the novelist 
awakens to the fact that he is really in 
love with hie own wife. 

Instead, though, of winning her back 
by Iovemaklng, be turns her over to the 
foreigner and sends them off upon a 
"honeymoon," telling the foreigner to take 
good care of "our wife." Then Rosamond 
PureeU, a matrimonial expert who haa 
achieved a reparation for curing husbands 
of "wife trouble," is gent for by the novel- 
ist. She prescribes a large dose of jealousy, 
which finally succeeds in turning the wife's 
attentions from the handsome foreigner. 
' But the complications have only Just be- 
gun, for the pretty matrimonial expert 
■thinks herself In lore with the husband 
and the plot keeps tangling np until almost 
the grand finale, when everything, of 
course, turna out aa it does in ah weU reg- 
ulated musical comedies. 

Richard P. Temple, in the role of a 
Scotch hotel proprietor, made a distinctive 
nit Joseph Letore and Emflie Lea. who 
Played the parts of the foreigner and wife, 
rendered several song hits and won ap- 
plause with their dancing. Individual 
honors also went to Alicia McCarthy, 
Mary McCarthy, George Mack and Irene 
Rowan. Throughout the piece, the clever 
work of Cecil Lean and alias Mayfield waa 
forever apparent 

The book la by Frank Mandel lyrics by 
gdward Panlton, and music by Silvio 
Heto. The piece is presented by Spiegel 
Productions, Inc., under the personal direc- 
tion of Max Spiegel 

"GREENWICH FOLLIES" MOVES UP 

v jfe C t*S , , wl< * vm — «V»WeB," which 
baa been holding forth down at the Green- 
wich Village Theatre, and which waa to 
have moved uptown about a month ago, 
but waa prevented by the strike, moved to 
the Non Bayes Theatre Tneaday night 



THE NEW YORK C LI P P E R 



.... W«*-*.»-* 



September 10, 1919 



PARIS ACTORS WIN AFTER 
STRIKE AN D THEAT RE LOCKOUT 

Manager* Met Demand* with Refusal and Then Closed Houses 
""* as C«t» Quit, Only to par* Jncrfeai<* j> * 
in Salaries Later. 



Paris, France, Sept. 8. — A threatened 
Btrike of actors here and a threat from the 
managers of retaliation by a lockout, were 
both carried oat Saturday night when the 
audience had filled the Gaiety and the per- 
formance was about to- start. The leaaer 
of the orchestra then approached M. Franz, 
manager of the house, with an ultimatum 
making certain demands. He refused them 
and both parties made good their threats, 
the actors by walking but and the manage- 
ment by declaring a lockout. 

The other houses, with the exception of 
Le Opera, Le Opera Comique, Le Comedle 
Fran caise and Le Odeon, which have been 
granted subsidies by the government and re- 
mained open despite the conditions, fol- 
lowed suit as did 350 moving picture houses 
and about twenty music halls. AH the va- 
riety halls also declared lockouts at once. 

Several managers, did not even wait for 
the strike to be called, but closed their thea- 
tres and soon a general Iocqout had been de 
dared, in which the theatres closed included 
the following music halls, "Follies Begere," 
"La Cigale," "Casino de Paris," "Mari- 
veaus," Mayol," "Olympia," "Alhambra," 
"Ambassadors," "Alcaxar," "Appolla," "Le 
Reaneisance," "Le Femina," "Le Edwardes 
TIL" At least 10,000 workers from all the 
music halls and variety theatres were af- 
fected. 

The Inter-Sy ndical Committee which rep- 
resents the unions of all stage , folks, from 
musicians and actors, to stage hands and 
electricians provided free open air perform- 
ances to win the public favor and succeeded 
in doing so. 



At a meeting yesterday, it was decided 
to ask the managers to reopen the eheatres, 
and amusement places, provided they agreed 
to pay actors and actresses for' the time 
they were locked out, and provided also, 
that they place any agreement of a settle- 
ment before the committee for ratification. 
The managers at once declared the lockout 
off and provided a higher scale of wages 
than that paid before, but refused absolutely 
to deal with the union committees indi- 
vidually. 

The demands of the actors were as fol- 
lows. 

No one must be hired for an .important 
role without three years' experience at three 
specified theatres. 

An actor must not be forced to rehearse 
a part more than four times if he has al- 
ready appeared, in it. 

An actor or actress has a role permanent- 
ly for the season when he or she has played 
it four times.' 

Actors or actresses in principal roles 
most not be forced to rehearse on the day of 
performance. 

The musicians , union made the following 
demands: 

All members of the working staffs must 
belong to the Federation. Musicians who 
work two weeks are automatically engaged 
for the season. Musicians must' be paid 
for all work outside strictly orchestra work, 
such as work behind the scenes or on the 
stage. Machinists and electricians must 
get -22 francs (4.40) daily, with a weekly 
day off with pay. Dancers must have 
their weekly day off. 



MOROSCO SUED FOR DIVORCE ';-.- 

Los Angeles, .Sept.' 7.— -Charging" her 
husband with cruel and inhuman treatment; 
and .with misconduct with Selma Paley. 
former star at the Burbarik Theatre here, ' 
Mrs. Oliver Morosco, wife of. the theatre 
proprietor and producer, has filed suit in 
Los Angeles for separate maintenance and 
for an' in junction to- restrain him from dis- 
posing of or encumbering *un y of their c\Sm- . 
nmnity property , -estimated by Mrs. Moroc- 
co to be worth at least $200,000.' .," .. 
- Five hundred dollars a 'month is asked 
for the separate maintenance of Mrs. Mor- 
osco and their son, Walter, twenty years of 
age. The charge is made that Morosco and. 
Selma Paley are living together at Long 
Beach, N. Y., as N. A. Paley and wife. 

The MoroscoB were married in San Fran- 
cisco in 1807 and lived together for more 
than twenty-one years. Not until last Aug- 
ust, Mrs. Morosco says, did she learn of 
Morosco' s conduct with the actress. The 
community, property includes leases on 
theatres in New York, Chicago, Los An- 
geles, San Francisco and Oakland. 

The Plaintiff also complains that Moros- 
co, without her knowledge or consent, sold 
to the Famous Players Lasky Company 
"Peg o' My Heart" for $40,000 and other 
theatrical productions controlled jointly by 
them, and failed to give her her share of 
the proceeds. ,'.. 

- SEEKING DRUMMER AND COIN 

Galesbuko, IiX., Sept 8. — Emil Schoen- 
berger, bass drummer in Gay Jasperson's 
band with the Irving J. Polack World At 
Home Shows, is. being songht by the show 
folk, who claim that he disappeared 'here 
this week after neglecting to return $100 
or over which he had collected in various 
sums from the managers and performers 
about the show. 

Schoenberger had been in the habit of 
handling post office and parcel business for 
the shows and the greatest losers, it is said, 
were Oggi Gomes, Mexican lasso expert 
with the Rhoda Royal circus and Wild 
West and Mrs. Tom Kelly, wife of the 
manager of the side show. Schoenberger, 
who is a recently discharged soldier, joined 
the shows a few weeks ago at Lima, O. 
The police have been notified. 



STRIKE LAWYERS' FEES HEAVY 

It was estimated early this week by a 
theatrical attorney who is familiar -with 
the fees charged by prominent lawyers in 
cases that attract wide public interest, that 
at least $75,000 will be the amount the 
managers will have to pay the lawyers who 
acted for them during the actors' strike. 

Chief among those who will receive a 
large fee for his services is Bainbridge 
Colby, chosen by William. Klein, the Shu- 
bert attorney, as the counsel in chief for 
the managers. Mr. Colby, it is reported, 
will receive a fee of $26,000, he having al- 
ready received $5,000 on ! account as a 
retainer. Charles S. Tattle and Edward 
Auerbach, both being members of the law 
firm of Da vies, Stone and Auerbach will 
receive fees- totaling $20,000. •.- 

Nathan Burkan, attorney: for: Smith and 
Golden and Charles B. Dillingham, William 
Klein, attorney for the Shuberts and one 
or two legal luminaries of lesser import- 
ance will probably divide between them at 
least $30,000 in fees for the special services 
they rendered during the strike to their 
managerial clients. 

"LADY IN RED" STARTS AGAIN 

John P. Slocum has presented an en- 
tirely revised version of "The lady in 
Red," which opened last Monday night in 
Syracuse. An entire act has been elimi- 
nated, the piece running with two acts 
now instead of the three which it possessed 
when it played here at the Lyric Theatre 
last season, with Adele Rowland.- The 
show's cast this season is headed by Ruth 
McTamaney and Arthur Deagon and in- 
includes Carrie . Reynolds, George Tripp 
and Earl Yates. 



; WATSON HAS BIG WEEK 

Cleveland Ohio, Sept. ^"Sliding" 
Billy Watson, who was at the Empire last 
week, played to the largest week's busi- 
ness ever done- by -a brirfesqne at 'that 
house. His receipts were $T,12»:83, a rec- 
ord and they only' plajr six days' 1 here? "' "■' 



"DOUBLE HARNESS" IS TRITE 

" Washington, D. C, Sept. 8. — By the 
time Maurice- E. Marks and Edward A. 
Paul ton eliminate the anti-prohibiton ' pro- ' 
paganda and the cruder manifestations of 
hokum and Jazz .from "Double Harness," 
the three act' comedy that Joseph Klaw 
presented here tonight at the Belasco, they 
may have a play which will run 100 min- 
utes. The observation affords one an idea 
of the amount of material in the production 
which can even charitably be classed as 

passable. -..J -.....; ... 

''Double Harness" in its present form, 
would probably be refused transportation 
into New York, it is doubtful if any one 
can twist the theme of the piece into a 
form .that will be more than trite. The' 
plot is reminiscent, to speak kindly. It's 
the old reliable story of the snappy lad 
from Columbus, Ohio, who invades the 
Buckeye State small town, puts, over some 
high financing that' would easily deceive a 
person rnifamflisr with the English lang- 
uage and manages to combine two hated 
rival interests, cop off a third share for 
himself and win the girl of the story. All 
of which is presented in a fashion as full' 
of suspense and sustained interest as the 
dramatic opus ■ of your nearest green 
grocer. 

Just why the. authors have voiced so 
loud, long and incessant indignation at the 
act of July 1, 1919, is a matter of some 
mystery,- but. they make their characters 
behave as if prohibition were merely im- 
minent and not an actuality in localities 
outside of New. York, Atlantic. City and 
Cumberland Gap. -They even manage to 
make a supposedly prohibitionist turn out 
a private tippler, thereby -outraging the 

, verities of the play rather frightfully. 

Charles Dow Clark scores heavily in a 
rube] role. Minnie Milne, Edgar Nelson, 
Sam' Edwards, Betty Alden, John Junior, 

! Howard Sloat, Ruth Donnelly, Frank 
McG-lynn.' Robert McCleary and. Helen 

• Gurrie" accept parts grace&ijly,. . John- Ben- • 

' dricks is a bit too heavy at present. 



SETTLE THREATENED SEPARATION 

That James Doyle, the dancer, of the 
team of Doyle and Dixon, and his wife. 
Gene Doyle, have been having marital 
differences, was learned last week when 
Mrs. Doyle had her husband served with a 
summons said to have been in an action 
for separation which she instituted through 
her attorneys, H. J. and F. E. Goldsmith. 

A process server served Doyle with the 
summons in the Pennsylvania Depot short- 
ly after he had alighted from a train on 
which he had come from ont of town. 

However, it was learned- that within 
twenty-four hours after Doyle had been 
served with the papers, he became .recon- 
ciled with Mrs. Doyle and she, in turn, 
withdrew the suit she had so recently in-., 
atitnted. 



f JOLSON AND WIFE MAKE UP 

Lo8 Angeles, Sept. 9. — Al Jolson is re- 
ported here to have become reconciled with 
his wife, from whom' he . was divorced in 
Oakland' about two months ago. Friends 
of the re-united couple from many parts of 
the ' country have- been deluging them- with 
congratulatory I telegrams sincei dt became 
knovhi'-'tiurtTHey- have , T>ecoml reconciled 
and were -staying -atythe Van Jwjys Hotel, 
which they'lef t yesterday for Mw York. 

While the divorce suit which Mrs. Jolson 
brought several months ago in Oakland was 
still pending,' the comedian came to Cali- 
fornia with his New York attorney, William 
Klein, and attempted to settle the marital 
differences . that existed between them. 
Failing in this, he . arranged a financial 
settlement that Mrs. Jolson is reported to 
have disliked at the very outset, preferring 
to receive nothing from, the husband from 
whom she severed all marital ties, I Follow- 
ing 'the granting of the divorce decree, 
Jolson is said .to have left California for 
New York dispirited and broken hearted. 
' He spent much of his time in New York 
running here and there,' to fights in Phila- 
delphia and seeking other exciting forms 
of amusement designed to overcome the 
grief by which he was swept, in a manner 
that was arousing considerable comment 
among his 'friends in the East. 

All this time the "Sinbad" show in 
which he had been appearing was closed 
for the summer, bnt scheduled to open 
Labor Day in Philadelphia. There it was 
to have begun a tour that would have ended 
in California next Winter. He looked 
forward to 'the show's California engage- 
ment, for he had planned mentally to meet 
his wife 'here again and' resume thejr 
wedded life, which had begun twelve years 
ago. 

The actor's strike in New. York resulted 
in the "Sinbad" show's failure to open in 
Philadelphia as scheduled, so the' comedian 
deemed the time propitious for' a hurried 
trip to California. He' arrived here' early 
last week with his friend Bud De Sylva, 
the song writer. •■' 



BELASCO SHOW OPENS SEPT. 30 

"The Gold Diggers," a drama, by- Avery 
Hopwood will be presented by David 
Belasco at the Lyceum Theatre, September 
30, ' with Ina Clare in the stellar role. 
Others in the cast are, Bruce McRae, H. 
Reeves-Smith, Frederick Truesdell, Horace 
Braham, Austin Harrison, Harold Christy,- 
D. Lewis . Clinton, Frank Lewis. Jobyna 
Howland, Beverly West, Louis Galloway, 
Ruth Terry, Pauline Hall, Lily an Tash- 
man, Luella Gear, Gladys Feldman, Kath- 
erine Walsh and Louise Burton. Prelimi- 
nary performances in Washington will pre- 
cede the New York engagement. - . • ■ 



TRIXIE FRIGANZA SELLS HOME 

Triiie Friganza, at present in San 
Francisco, California, has sold her two- 
story home in Bensonhurst, Long Island, 
to Isaac Eisenberg. The Ford Sisters' also 
disposed of their home at 1941 84th street, 
Brooklyn, to Charles "Askln.*." ""' 



HELD COSTUMES BRING $3,000 

Costumes and personal effects of the 
late Anna Held, which went under the 
hammer of the auctioneer last week at a 
sale and exhibition held in the Waldorf- 
Astoria, brought more than $3,000. 

Scores of friends and admirers of the 
late star attended the 'sale and vied in 
bidding for her personal effects,' which 
-they desired to keep as mementos. One 
of the largest buyers was. Liane Carrera, 
daughter of Miss Held, who purchased all 
her mother's lingerie .and her scrap book. - 

The sale, included .seventy hats, fifty 
stage gowns and ISO pairs of shoes. The 
smallest sale was ten cents for a boy's 
hat and. the largest, aside "from the jew- 
elry, was $600, paid for several gowns and 
other belongings. 

Although most, of Miss Held's jewels 
. have not, as yet, been sold, her attorney, 
Thomas Keough, is daily receiving bids 
from, all over the country.- One pearl neck- 
lace, valued at $100,000, which startled 
theatredom when Miss Held appeared with 
it in a Broadway production ton. years ago, 
was sold to a New. York jeweler for 
$52,000. : 

A brooch, willed to Lillian Russell, 
which contained an oval pearl, flanked by 
two. sapphires, eight diamonds and six 
pearls, was also on exhibition.;, i 

Miss Held's jewels are appraised at 
$125,000, and it is expected that bids will 
far exceed that amount. Her. collection 
includes some of the finest work" of fa- 
mous Parisian jewelers. Among her fa- 
vorites which are now on sale are a pearl 
and diamond studded lavalliere valued at 
$8,500, and a pearl and diamond studded 
dog collar value at $9,000. There are 
many smaller pieces, including more than 
300 rings.- ': ■ •'• - ' ' 



. ALBEE STOCK. ENDS SEASON 

Providence, B. L, Sept, 7.— The A 1 bee 
Stock Company, playing at the Albee Thea- 
tre, this city, -closed its season 'last' night. 
This completes the twenty -fifth season' oT 
the company 



PLAYING MALE PART 

- Detroit, Mich., Sept 8.— Marie Curtis, 
one of the very few stock actresses who has 
played male roles, is portraying the role 
of "The Yogi" In "Eyes ' of Yontir? here.. 
produced- -by- Jessie Bonstelle, before she 
sails Tor England.' She is the first woman 
to play the part. - 



September 10. 1919 



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LAUDER TROUPE 
r TO TOUR 
AFRICA 

NEW ZEALAND ALSO INCLUDED 



SYDircr, Australia, August 15.— Tenta- 
tive plans were arranged here this week 
which will probably result in Sir Harry 
Lauder and bis vaudeville troupe making 
a tour of South Africa and New Zealand. 
The tour will probably begoin - early '■ in 
October following Sir Harry's tour in this 
country, which- began last May and is 
scheduled to close about the middle of next 
month. 

J. and N. Tait, under whose direction 
Lander is making his present Antipodean 
tour, have announced that the unprece- 
dented financial success that has attended 
the present tour led them to arrange its 
continuance in South Africa and New 
Zealand. 

Sir Harry opened here in Melbourne last 
May. From here he went to Adelaide and 
early this month began an engagement 
there, at the elose of which his Antipodean 
tour will come to an end. 

Since the beginning of his' tour in this 
country, Lauder has played to capacity 
business, his show being considered the 
beat vaudeville entertainment that Aus- 
tralia has witnessed in years. 

Muriel Window, the American singing 
comedienne whom Sir Harry brought with 
him to head his variety aggregation, has 
proven to be one of the features of the 
show. 



GRAND RAPIDS PARK CLOSES 

";Grand Rapids,, Mich., Sept 6.— ripamona 
Park, Reeds Laic, here, closed Its season 
this week, after, 'a very . successful run. 
The concessions were all paying proposi- 
tions. The theatre, which has been play- 
ing big time vaudeville all season, has been 
closed, and so has the restaurant The 
people connected with the Park have re- 
turned, for the most part,' to their homes 
In - Chicago. L. J. De Lamater, manager 
of the park, will have it repaired, redec- 
orated and repainted, prior to its opening 
next season. The bill for the last week 
was Hari Onuki, Bawls, Van and Kauf- 
man, Cesaire Rivoli, Charles Diamond and 
The Rosarios. ... 

.-;;: START PLAYING ACTS 
The Park Theatre, Manchester, New 
Hampshire, which has hitherto been a 
motion picture house, will open on Septem- 
ber 15 with a policy of vaudeville and 
pictures. The Sheedy office will book, ten 
acts into the house each week; five for 
each half. The theatre baa been remodeled 
and redecorated so. that it can now ac- 
commodate vaudeville as well as films. 



IAJ5J?R0DUCE*$t 
AGAIN TALK 

ASS'N 



NEW ACTS 



CLAIMS TOWNES USES HIS GAG 

George Yeoman has made a complaint 
against Sidney Townes through the N. Y. 
A. for using a gag that he claims to be 
his. He alleges that Townes heard it when 
the pair were playing on the 'same bill 
but that the gag had been written by James 
Madison for the Yeoman act The gag in 
question concerns a woman who went into 
a butcher shop for twenty-five cents worth 
of round steak, and the butcher said, "111 
let you smell the hook."' 

SHAYNE'S COMPLAINT UPHELD 

The N. V. A. has sustained Al Shayne 
in his complaint against Sabini and Good- 
man for infringing upon his act. A com- 
mittee reviewed both acts and decided that 
that portion of the act in which there is 
an altercation with a "plant" in the audi- 
ence is, on , the pan of Sabini and Good- 
man, a direct infringement on the other 
act and should be immediately eliminated 
from their routine... . ,.-..• 



MARRY IN CANTON 

Carton, Ohio, Sept. 6.— Hazel Smith, 
*>ne of the Three Riley Sisters, was mar- 
ried yesterday to Thayer Charles, musi- 
cal comedy and vaudeville performer, who 
has recently returned from France, where 
he served a year. 

The couple are travelling together 
throughout the middle west in a vaude- 
ville .offering. 



IT TOOK KETCHUM TO CATCH HIM 

On Monday night there was great ex- 
citement about the Riverside Theatre, for 
Madame Herman, at least, when her 
poodle dog,' Teddy, decided to take a ran 
up Broadway and bad gone all the way 
from 90th to 112th street before John 
Ketchum, still in his clown's costume, over- 
took and brought him back to the theatte. 



BERTRAM BEATS THEM ALL 

When it comes to chess, Robert Bertram 
is in a class by himself. There were 
twenty entries in the N. Y. A. chess 
tournament last week, and Bertram was an 
easy winner, taking every game he played. 
When he won the tournament he received 
congratulations. 



. FEATURED WITH BIG POM 

Two Russian' acts, "The Cathedral 
Quartette" and "The Balalaika Orchestra," 
are being featured with "The Right to 
Happiness," now at the Park Theatre, 
Columbus Circle. Both are under the 
management of Sunia Samuels. 



PANTAGES HOUSE OPENS 

'Spokane, Wash., Sept 6:— rThe Pant- 
ages Theatre here, opened this week under 
the management of R. Clarke Walker, with 
the old Fall and Winter policy. Shows on 
Sundays and holidays will be . continuous 
from 2 o'clock to 11 o'clock, with five com- 
plete vaudeville bills a day. 



BENNETT AND RICHARDS TO SAIL 

Bennett and Richards will sail for 
England Sept 10, where they will play the 
Moss circuit 



THINK IT WOULD BENEFIT ALL 



For a long time there has been con- 
siderable talk about forming an associa- 
tion among the producers of girl acta, for 
protection purposes, and it has sprung up 
again. 

At the present time, the producer of a 
vaudeville girl act is always in fear of 
a rival producer who is on the lookout for 
girls with sufficient experience and talent 
and does not hesitate to resort to stealing 
them from other productions. 

The girls who "touch" managers for 
small amounts and who always manage to 
stay ahead of the game' are another evil 
that the producer of tabs must deal with. 

Then, too, there is the girl who, after 
being perfected in rehearsals, "jumps" the 
show just when she is needed most. 

These are some of the problems that 
confront the producer of girl acta. Under 
present arrangements, he has no effective 
way of coping with these difficulties, and 
it is believed that an organisation where 
all the tab managers could work in a com- 
mon cause, would lead to happier results 
for all concerned. 



BROWN OBJECTS TO BILLING 
Tom Brown, formerly with the Six 
Brown Brothers, objects to the Brown 
Saxo Six using his name in billing their 
act and has . brought the matter to the 
official attention of the N. V. A. The act 
is. now playing middle western time. 



LA MONT HANDLING ARD ATH'S ACT 
Bert La Mont will handle the English 
bookings of; all of Fred- Ardatb's acts. 
These include "The Financiers," "The 
Deetsator," "Corner Store," "The Mor- 
row," etc.'- -,-•..■• 



TRIO SAILS FOR ENGLAND 

Biking, -Fay and El kins, sailed for Eng- 
land last.. week. They will open on' a tour 
of the. Moss theatres for which they have 

contract for twelve weeks and option. 



WINS FRENCH SCHOLARSHIP 

William H. Yodery, the colored com- 
poser and .instrumental arranger who 
organised the 807th Infantry Band, that 
afterwards became known as the Head- 
quarters Band in France, is leaving for 
France October IS, where he will enter the 
French High School of Musical Studies, 
in the- Palace of Fontainebleau. 

Yodery has received a tree two-year 
scholarship at this musical school, he hav- 
ing the distinction of being the only Ameri- 
can musician-composer to ever win ; a 
scholarship from this French musical in- 
stitution; Last August while stationed at 
Chaumont France, with his band, Yodery 
took the examination in competition with 
120 other musicians. Forty of this number 
passed with sufficient percentages* to entitle 
them to take the final examination, Yodery 
being among the forty. And In. the Anal 
examination he not only came ont first, bat 
he also * led with an unprecedented aver- 
age of 98, a mark that was acclaimed by 
musical scholars throughout France. His 
composition for the occasion was a de- 
scriptive tone poem entitled '"Two Months 
in the Old Mffl." 

• Yodery has orchestrated the music for. 
some of the foremost musical shows. 



\. 



BOOKING COLUMBIA CONCERTS 

Feiber and Shea are booking the Sun- 
day concerts at the Columbia Theatre, 
where the Sunday vaudeville performances 
were resumed last week. Nine acts are 
booked into the theatre on Sundays. 



COMPLAINS OF HONEY BOYS 

Alleging that the Honey Boys are using 
some of his original material, Dan Futch 
has appealed to the N. Y. A. to settle the 
dispute and determine his rights in the 
matter. Futch was with the Honey Boys 
for several' seasons, and says that when 
he quit the act they continued to use ma- 
terial and business that he had originally 
introduced and which belongs to him. 



1 iDec-notfirftbe magician, whg-has just uu- 
"is'hed playing the A>E. P. and Y. circuits 
liA ; FraW,v1ielglen* and Germany, is pre- 
paring a new vaudeville called ,T MadeIon! 
Madelon! Madelonl" in which he will be 
assisted by Miss Shannon. He opens in 
Chicago soon on the Western Vaudeville 
time. 

"Marvel," the deaf mute female dancer 
impersonator, will be seen in a new spec- 
tacular dance act to be produced by Sea- 
bury & ShaW shortly. 

Jeanne & Norma Golden, with Hy Glanan 
at the piano, will break in a new act the 
latter part of next week. 

Etta Haans, late of musical comedy and 
at present in vaudeville, will head a new 
female minstrel act which Jules Larvet is 
producing for her. The aet will play the 
better vaudeville houses. 

Browne and Alain, comedy singing, talk- 
ing act with special scenery. 

Yickers Sisters and Dave Dillon, a new 
singing, dancing and piano aet 

Benton and Shore, new comedy act in 
one with special scenery, called "The Wop 
Johnnie." 

Jack King, just back from nineteen 
months' service in France, is to do a new 
act with a female partner under the team 
name of Waverly and Ludlow. 

Eunice Sauvaine, formerly SkeUye and 
Sauvaine, to be seen in a new act pro- 
duced by the K A L Enterprises, called 
"Over Your Heads." 

"Boardwalk Breezes'' is the title of a 
new aet being produced by the Thor office. 
Milo Belden wrote the book and lyrics and 
Winfield De Long the music. It has a cast 
of nine. . 

Sam Gold, formerly of Gold, Reece and 
Edwards, is rehearsing a new act to be 

S resented under the management of Ben 
turns. - • 

Burns and Garry, the former of Smith 
and Garry, and the latter of Burns and 
Jose, will soon do a new act opening on 
the Poll time.: - 

Frank Evans, Robe Johnson and Ted 
Evans are showing a new "rube" act en- 
titled "The Old Meeting House." 

"Pop" Ward and Johnny Curran have 
joined forces and will again do their old 
act called "The Stagehand." Mark Levy 
has booked it on theXoew time. The turn 
is breaking in out of town this week. 

Princess Missrah and Company, in an 
"Oriental Fantasy," is a. new act which 
Paul Durand is >ini«*nt»»g The turn which 
includes singing, dancing and talking Is 
breaking in ont of town. 

An act of Harry Hart, formerly with a 
Morrosco production and Ed. Lowery, re- 
cently with Liana Carrera, is all set The 
boys will open on the Fox circuit. 

The Carli ale 8, well known in wild west 
show circles,, are breaking in a new west- 
ern novelty act which will be seen shortly 
in the local theatres. . * 



MAXELL HAS NEW ACT 

Willis Maxell, the dancer, is arranging 
a new act for himself and partner which, 
after being shown outside for three or four 
weeks, will be brought into New York. 



BRAY REACHES JAPAN 

The Orpheum Offices are in receipt of 
a cablegram from' Mr. and Mrs. C. E. 
Bray, stating that they have arrived safely 
in Yokohama, Japan, on their world tour. 



WILL PRODUCE TABS 

Fred Martins, Inc., is the name of a 
new producing company formed last week 
to produce musical tabs. The first three 
releases will be "Divorce a la Carte," 
"Bachelor's Club" and Sporting Love." 
Tbe music of~tbese is being written by 
Jack Smyth. The company has been in- 
corporated for $10,000. 

MRS. PRIMROSE HEADS ACT 

Los Angeles. Sept. 6. — The Primrose 
Minstrels, founded by the late George 
Primrose, have been headlining here -at 
Pantages .theatre. Mrs. George Primrose 
baa stepped into the cast and is acting as 
interloentor. * . 



HAVE SIX ACTS COMING 

The recently, incorporated K. mid L, 
Theatrical Enterprises, Inc., with a capi- 
talization of $5,000, plans to present six 
new vaudeville acts within the next two 
months. Bernard Lohmuller. the producer. 
Roberta Keene Tubman and William Tuj- 
man, are the individuals who organized the 
corporation. 

The corporation's initial offering is 
called "Oh, What A Girl" and Is an elec- 
trical novelty act in which Eunice Sanv- 
ain," formerly of the team of Skelly and 
Sauvain. is being featured. The act is 
scheduled to open in a Keith out-of-town 
house on Thursday of this week. Shortly 
after this act is presented, another one to 
be known .as the NC-4 Quartette, with a 
regular seaplane, will be presented. 



° OPENS ON FOX TIME 
"Dangerous Dan McGrew," the 



Fred 



Ardath act which was seen here last- sea- 
son, but 'has been idle for some time, opens 
on the Fox time this week. 



8 



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«Ri -IS qftEJnb-g r 10, 1919 




PALACE 



Strassell's Animals, two sea H°ns, a 
pony and two dogs, opened th* show The 
main feature of the act, in fact ninety per 
cent of it, is the clever work ol the sea 
Sons, who do a number of *"««*"• 
tricks. One of the lions, m addition to 
riding a pony while Juggli-* * W» his 
nose, plays "America", an a senes o£ trum- 

"^Foley and O'Neill did excellently in 'the 
second spot with some well rendered songs 
and. dancing bits. The -tenor sang an ex- 
ceptioiiallyfine balled called That. Won- 
derful Mother of Mine" with excellent vo- 
cal effect and scored one of the big hits of 
the act with the -melodious number. 

Charles King, held over from last week, 
did not do as well as the early position 
of the act would seem to. promise. King 
has a great deal to do in it, in fact is on 
continually from the curtain's rise to «s 
fall and his voice seemed tired beforfe he 
had finished the exacting role. The four 
girls sang and danced as pleasingly as 
ever and the entire offering U of I high 
order If some slight re-arrangement 
-whereby King could get a short rest be- 
tween his numbers could be effected, it 
would be advantageous! 

Walter Brower, the personality boy, is 
back at bis house after a long absence and 
his appearance gave promise of a new 
act. But. with the beginning of his rou- 
tine, all hopes of something new vanished. 
He is still telling of his marriage ana the 
wedding trip to New York iri."t&e upper 
berth, the prohibition bit, and the recita- 
tion regarding the prodigal girL If 
Brewer's material were only new, if it 
measured up to his fine personality, what 
a hit he would be. 

The Creole Fashion Plate closed the 
first part with a slightly re-arranged act 
that is an improvement over his old of- 
fering. His songs are better, particularly 
the -Carolina Sunshine" and "I'm ■ a 
Dreamer That's Chasing Bubbles" num- 
bers, and he is showing some beautiful 
costumes. He has a new finish to the 
act and, after changing from woman's at- 
tire to that of a man, makes a rapid change 
to the girl again. This bit, while a good 
finish, will make no hit with the females, 
who usually ■ insist that it takes an hour 
to dress, while he demonstrates that a 
complete change can be made in consider- 
ably less than a minute. 

During the intermission, ' up-to-the-min- 
ute pictures showing the arrival of Persh- 
ing were shown and did about as much as 
anything could to rouse the audience from 
its langour and lassitude. 

After Topics of the Day were shown the 
Arnaut Brothers, with their clowning and 
instrumental playing, entertained mildly 
for several minutes. The falling off the 
chair bit continues to be the feature 
laughing bit and the bird imitations regis- 
tered strongest as an applause incentive. 

Ted Lewis, now in his third week, scored 
the big applause hit of . the bin- with his 
Jazz Band which, under his clever direc- 
tion, is constantly improving. Lewis has 
made a few changes in the act and each 
one is a laugh producer. In its present 
shape the Lewis act is in a class all by 
itself and its success is sach that it could 
continue at the Palace almost indefinitely. 
Lewis possesses exceptional ability ; so 
much, in fact, that his- future as a single, 
when the Jazz Band fad is over, seems as- 
sured. It will be interesting to watch the 
stage future of this young comedian, so 
suddenly shot into prominence. by the Jazz 
tune craze. 

Anna Wheaton and Harry Carroll, the 
songwriter, did well considering their po- 
sition. They sang a number of Carroll's 
old and new song compositions and Car- 
roll's voice, by some miraculous means, 
sounded quite musical. 

Berk and Valda, with' Granville English 
at the piano, closed the show with a well 
put on dance offering. The pair are a 
clever couple and held the audience in well 

W. V. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

""' (Continued on page* • 



10) 



RIVERSIDE 



COLONIAL 

Due to the length of the last and feature 
act, the program was necessarily shortened 

to seven acta this week. 

■Wm Perry, in his now famous-creation, 
"The Frog," opened the show and got 
away to a nice hit. He offered his well- 
balanced stage contortionist act and, it 
might be said, he need fear nothing from 
anyone. His stunts are difficult and well 
done. '•. '' — 

Stanley and Birnes, in their well known 
dance offering, were second. They term 
their act, "After the Club." Why, we can- 
not see ; but, aside from that, it is a very 
acceptable dance offering. They open with 
a song or two in which they tell of their 
having been married and divorced . on the 
same identical days. They then go' into 
a routine of double stepping, which if not 
new and novel, is at least extremely en- 
tertaining. They scored a large hit and 
had to take an encore. 

Arthur Havel and Company, in "Play- 
mates," "were. the third dish on the menu 
and proved very relishing. They have a 
comedy playlet that has to 'do. with a 
"Mama's Boy" who belies his outward ap- 
pearance. Little Reggie has no playmates 
and so his mother secures a nice "rough- 
neck" for his playmate. The "roughneck," 
immediately begins to teach the kid a few 
lessons and sonny dear hands him a.- sur- 
prise. The comedy was well handled • by 
Havel and his assistants. 

Fallon and Brown are offering a rather 
good comedy act in which the only objec- 
tion is that they too often allude to the 
part they played in the war. But the war 
stuff doesn't go any more. Fallon gives a 
remarkably good imitation of Bert Fitx- 
gibbons. They scored a hit and had to 
take .an oncore. • 

The Barr Twins, have a likeable danc- 
ing offering, the only fault with which was, 
the inability of the orchestra to play their 
music right at any rate, this was. the case 
on Monday afternoon. The girls, who have 
personality coupled with talent and a neat 
offering, scored a decided hit. They open 
with a number in which they tell of how a 
girl must win a fellow now-a-days, and go 
into a dance. Each time they "effect a 
change ■ of costume. . Their • accompanist. 
Bud Bernie, offered a solo. They also 
offered"* semi-old fashioned number, which 
was followed by an oriental dance in ap- 
propriate costume. The act closed with a 
Chinese novelty number. 

Following intermission. Herndne Shone 
an Jack Denny, assisted by a company of 
two men and one woman, offered "Peggy 
O'Brien." a heterogeneous offering com- 
posed of several bits of business that at- 
tempt to ridicule the vaudeville statge. The 
writer is not in sympathy with Miss 
Shone's offering at alL Why she ever 
abandoned the "classic" she had before is 
inconceivable. This act does not give her 
the opportunity to display her talents that 
she. had in the other. J 

The big act of the program was "Chic- 
ken Chow Mean," a rather puzzling dish, 
for it is composed of so many different 
kinds of good vaudeville food that an at- 
tempt to combine them tends rather to 
sour what was intended for a very sweet 
dish. Flo Lewis and Jay Gould do the 
best work in the act and try very hard. 
The chorus is pretty and each member does 
a bit of specialty. The supporting com- 
pany all tried their best, but of them all, 
only the little toe dancer succeeded in im- 
pressing the audience. The trouble with 
this act is that there is too much to it. 
The plot is rather fishy, running here and 
there, - and landing nowhere in particular. 
The opening number by the chorus was 
poorly done, as the girls were all out of 
step. The Ethel Barrymore bit is over- 
done. So is the shimmey which is fast 
losing its Togue. ■ S. K. 



ROYAL 

Buck Pielert "and Abbie Scofield offered 
a balancing act, in which the man does 
all of the stunts, while the girl assists 

with a, stream of chatter and a. song. The 
feats performed by the man are' not very 
much out of the ordinary, but the con- 
stant stream, of talk by the girl seems, to 
help the act along. The closing stunt, in 
which the man balances a large wheel. on 
a_rod_upon his chin is a good one, and 

made a good finish 

The Tw.q, Jesters,. Bigelow and Clinton, 
started with a sort of introductory song, 
and followed with a current comedy, song. 
A comedy song by one of them alone, and 
it did not go particularly well. A jazzy 
song was followed by one with a touch 
of -the Far East. It helped the pair score 
at the finish. 

Hackett and Delmar offered a song and 
dance. act that was good in spots and not 
quite so good in others.. - The girl is a 
capable dancer, but the man did not ap- 
pear to be" in particularly good form, and 
faltered in more than one of his steps. 
They started with a double song and 
dance, after which the girl did a semi- 
classic dance along. Delmar followed with 
a Bong and dance, after which Miss Hack- 
ett did an Oriental dance. There was an- 
other dance by Delmar, and then one by 
his partner, whom he joined at the end. 
Jack Inglis in his single amused the 
audience and walked off with. a hit under 
his belt. Inglis has an act that includes 
numerous witty bits,' although there are 
one or two places where the pace slows 
up; The rest of the act is for the greater, 
part sure fire, and Inglis uses his material 
to good advantage, with the result that he 
is successful. 

- Jimmy Hussey and Company appeared 
in "Move On," an elaborately staged pro- 
duction, written by Hussey. Tot Qualters, 
who was with George White's -dancing act 
.last season,' and William' Wdrsely are seen 
in prominent roles in the offering, which 
also includes a jazz band and a few minor 
characters. • 

While the act scored a hit, and there, 
was the usual demand for HuBsey's songs, 
there is one fault in the offering — the 
principal does not have enough to do in 
the turn. There are" several^ good gags 
which give him opportunities - to get 
laughs, but the spontaneous roar of mirth 
which his old act always caused, somehow 
or other was not forthcoming. Tot Qual- 
ters was the center of attraction for a' 
good length of time, supplying a recitation 
and shimmy dance; and Worsely sang a 
ballad, while Hussey sang a few of the 
songs which he used in his soldier act. 

Elizabeth M. Murray sang a. few songs 
and told a number of stories. Her work 
seemed to be just what was wanted, for 
she registered heavily and had to take an 
encore. She displayed a tendency while 
telling her stories to start many of her 
sentences with the word "so," which didnt 
sound very well when so often repeated, 
but, otherwise, she put her selections and 
gags over in fine fashion. 

James C. Morton and his family, Mamie, 
Edna and Alfred, scored a hit, making it 
necessary for Morton to deliver a curtain 
speech before departing Morton is an 
exceptionally clever comedian, and while 
there are many places in the act where 
the material is not of the best quality, 
Morton handles it in such a way as to 
draw laughter. 

Phil Baker, assisted by a plant in one 
of the upper boxes, stopped the show. ! . He 
did not get off to a very fast start, but 
worked zealously and with the aid of his 
plant, rang up a great hit. 

Reno, in an act patterned after that of 
Joe Jackson, closed the show and held the 
crowd in until the very finish. His antics 
caused much mirth. ' L S. 



' Adelaide Herrm'an, "widow of ~the~fa- 
mous "Herrmah the' Great," assisted by a 
company of three, opened, the show with 
a aeries 'of* the " mystifying tricks which 
made her late husband's name known the 
world over. ._■ . -, .-' ; 

Frank Crumit,- who plays -the guitar and 
ukelele is singing some -new songs in addi- 
tion to *he »half dozen or more: old ones 
which have been .associated with his act 
for many j seasons. Crumit has _, a light 
tenor voice of plaintive quality which lends 
itself, well to the old "fashioned melodies. 
These songs" of other days seem to appeal 
to- Crumit as" well as his audiences. as in 
addition to singing them he dresses them as 
welV tiiS _ 3othes and make, up suggesting 
the country boy of a_quarter_of a century 
agoriather'than the vaudeville entertainer 
. of to-day. 

Mile. -Diane and. Jan Rubtni haye a 
musical, act in which the artistic musicianly 
ability of Rnbini and the cabaret style of 
the. Madamoiselle are curiously blended. 
The singer possesses the nasal tonal qual- 
ity usually heard in the singing 'of the 
French ehanteuse, and a breathy voice 
production seldom found, among singers of 
her nationality, i Among her songs were 
"Madelon" and a parody on "A Little Love, 
A Little Kiss" rendered with a auggestive- 
ness of manner hardly in keeping with the 
Other portions of the act. Rubini is a 
fine violinist, . he plays with the -smooth 
flowing tone and delicacy of expression 
which is a delight to the ear. A piano ac- 
companist billed as Salvatore played ac- 
ceptably and with a change in .the vocal 
department of the act if would live up to 
its billing which is "a miniature recital." 

Olsen and Johnson, a nut pianist and 
singer have an act which is difficult to de- 
scribe. It is a -weird -collection of songs 
and instrumental bite put-together without 
rhyme or reason, and which could be 
rendered backwards fully, as well as ac- 
cording-' to its • present ' routine. Present 
day vaudeville patrons are getting much 
enjoyment from acts of this nature and as 
long as the taste continues, Olsen and 
Johnson will be a hit. They were on Mon- 
day night. 

Carlos Sebastian, assisted by Olga Myra 
and Arthnr Anderson have -. a song ! and 
dance offering called "Bubbles!' which 
ranks with vaudeville's most artistic pro- 
ductions. In four scenes, the story of the 
little" playlet is unfolded in song, dance 
and story. It is a dream of bubbles and as ■ 
the colored globes float upward Sebastian 
lives once more his life and dream of love. 
Olga Myra, an excellent dancer makes an 
excellent partner for Sebastian, and in ad- 
dition to her dance numbers does some good 
i violin playing. Anderson- played the piano 
accompaniments and rendered an effective 
solo. One or two of the best numbers in 
the act, were however practically spoiled 
by the inability of the orchestra and An- 
derson to get into' the same tempo. 

Alice Hamilton, bills . her monologue a 
"Breath of Lavender and Old Lace." It 
is wholly charming and she cleverly told 
of the refined old lady's experience while 
on a visit, to. her city wise young son. 

Dooley and Sales have changed one or 
two songs in their "Will Yer Jim?" act but 
that is about all since it was first shown 
several seasons, ago.-. In reality the act is 
nothing more than a personality offering 
and as long-as that holds they w-ill continue 
to score strongly on almost any bill. Per- 
sonality, however is an elusive quality, 
rarely extending over 'a "great, period of 
years -and should be fostered by the con- 
stant supply of the best and finest material. 
In spite of its success new material is 
badly needed in the Dooley act. 

Frisco and his Jazz band found- the late 
spot and the hot night a combination too 
difficult to successfully contend with. The 
snap and vim' .of the act seem to have dis- 
appeared and it is now but mildly enter- 
taining. While the Jazz was at its height 
Frisco, once around, was a sensation, but 
the Jazz is going and Frisco with it. 

W. V. 



September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




ORPHEUM 

Jack Hanlcy opened the show with an 
act that included juggling, balancing and 
bits of. manipulation. 

Helen McMaaon, Maurice Diamond and 
Ethel Rose ve re offered a song and dance 
act that received its full quota of applause. 
The act is nicely staged and does not las 
for a moment. The trio is a capable one 
and the hit which it scored was fully 
merited. ' A song and dance ensemble 
Btarted^them off. There came a- song by 
one of the girls, after which there was a 
rag doll number.' Diamond .did a dance 
that- got him' a good sized .hand. There 
was another vocal number then and a 
dance by the company to close. 
• The'Jazzland Naval Octette, eight boys 
•who have seen' service, proved that the 
audience here, has not tired of jazz music. 
They rendered ■ several popular melodies, 
(instrumental, and song)" as well as a few 
bits of dancingj -A few of the boys are 
versatile chaps, one of them playing the 
banjo, violin and saxophone, while an- 
other also played several instruments. 
The company put its selections over nicely, 
scored a hit and took an encore. 

Brendel and Bert offered a comedy skit 
that had the audience in an uproar. The 
male member of the company- is a Swede 
comedian and exceptionally clever. The 
girl offers good assistance to him and the 
two work well together. There are num- 
erous Irish, Wop and Hebrew comedians 
in vaudeville now, but Swede imperson- 
ators are rare. Brendel, playing . on the 
big time,' will supply a deficiency. There 
is much slap-stick comedy in evidence, all 
handled in expert fashion. 

There was a delay after this act and 
the audience was impatient. Even Louis 
Beinhard, the orchestra leader, became ir- 
ritated. Films showing the arrival of 
General Pershing were then flashed. 

"For Pity's Sake," the C. B. Maddock 
playlet which . features Thomas Duraj, 
dosed the initial section of the program 
and had the audience giggling with mirth. 
It is a rube playlet with a goodly number 
- of funny bits, a good cast and plenty of 
action. In addition, it is staged in a most 
suitable manner. The burlesque on the 
old-fashioned melodrama is - really funny 
and with Duray impersonatng an entire 
orchestra, it was a scream. 

Craig Campbell followed. "Topics of the 
Day" and sang a few classical arias. Hec- 
tor McCarthy, announced as the composer 
of one of the pieces, accompanied him upon 
the piano and did his share well. Camp- 
bell" has a voice with a .wide rang*? possess- 
ing many pleasing qualities but displays a 
tendency to keep it covered. In spite of 
this fact, his selections were received with 
enthusiasm and he registered- solidly. . 

Dorothy and Madeline Cameron, assist- 
ed by Dave Dryer at the piano, presented 
a dance act that met with approval The 
girls dance well and Dryer is a capable 
pianist The girls started with a song, 
which they followed with a dance. Dryer. 
then imitated a pianola. There were then 
two more dance numbers, with Dryer giv- 
ing another solo. The music for the act 
hag been written .and- arranged by Dryer, 
who receives credit for it on the program- 
Lew Dockstader delivered a monologue, 
which opened with talk centered about pro- 
hibition. He lingered for some time on the 
subject of the "Death of John Barleycorn,* 
but drifted to talk about women, marriage 
and then politics. Dockstader "had a num- 
ber of witty remarks to make about the 
President and bis relations with the Sen- 
ate and the manner in which he delivered 
them kept the audience laughing continu- 
ally. Dockstader is one of the best mono- 
logists appearing in vaudeville and every- 
thing he says is really funny. ' He scored 
a hit of plentiful proportions. 

The Breen Family dosed the show and 
their work, most of which is truly 'novel, 
tept the crowd seated. -J, {J,- 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(Continued (ras» P**e * *nd an p*s« It) . 



T 



ALHAMBRA 



The Dorans offered a surprise dancing 
skit which took a bigger hand than the 
usual opening is accorded. One of the 
boys works as a female until the last 
number of the offering, and, while his 
features and limbs would betray his sex 
to a close observer, his dancing is very- 
light and graceful. His brother also does 
some good work. The two have a good 
variety of numbers and go through their 
routine without a hitch. 

The Shirley Sisters have added quite a 
few new costumes to their wardrobe, and 
look very pretty. The two would greatly 
benefit themselves by studying the art of 
delivery, especially . in the type of songs 
which these girls render, all of them being 
popular published numbers. 

"On the Ragged Edge" was brought up 
from the second half, exchanging places 
with Gallagher and Rolley. The offering 
is . called a jazz comedy, and was written 
by Frances Nordstrom. The playlet is a 
sort of jazz satire on, a melodrama, and, 
as it is, pleases. However, the idea can 
be elaborated on to a larger extent to 
much better advantage. 

Harry Kranz and Bob LaSalle, working 
in the fourth position after being a num- 
ber two act for quite a long time, showed 
that, no matter what spot' they have, these 
boys are bound to stop the show. This 
they did, and, considering the small size 
of the audience, and the .extreme heat of 
Monday evening, it was a feat to boast 
of. Since the boys have inaugurated their 
dance imitations at the close of- the act, 
they have been a. riot in each of the 
theatres in which the writer has reviewed 
them and are setting a record. 

Homer B. Mason and Marguerite Keeler, 
assisted by George E. Romaine, presented 
their travesty on the eternal triangle. The 
playlet is very cleverly handled by the 
cast, and is, in itself, an extremely clever 
offering. The consternation of the Span- 
iard on' finding that the husband of the 
wife .with whom he intends to elope does 
not object proved an excellent comedy situ- 
ation. Romaine, as the Spaniard, gave ex- 
cellent support -to Mason and Keeler, 
whose work needs no comment. 

Following the intermission, Ed Gal- 
lagher and Joe Rolley, offered "The Bat- 
tle of Whatstheuse," which has been 
greatly improved since seen here last. The 
pair have added a few new gags, and handle 
their material to good advantage. Gal- 
lagher has added a mustache to his part 
of the act, and it looks as though it will 
turn into something — some day. Roller, 
as the ' black-face comedian, did excel- 
lently, but the harmonica bit could have a 
little more to it. 

None t te, assisted by a pianist, unbilled, 
has not only retained her popularity with 
vaudeville patrons during her absence in 
musical comedy, hut increased it. It would 
only be repeating what has been said over 
and over again, to say that her personality, 
is exceptional, her voice very good, and 
her. playing on the violin artistic. Her 
pianist rendered capable assistance. 

Homer Dickinson and Grace Deagon 
have improved their offering by the addi- 
tion of new material in the way of gags. 
Dickinson holds up his end of the offering 
very nicely, and, as a "kid" comedienne, 
Grace Deagon can be rated among the beat. 
Even though the pair have added a num- 
ber of new gags, they can improve their 
skit still further by changing a lot of the 
old ones, which' are still in the act, for 
newer material. 

"The Sculptor's Dream," a posing act, 
presented by Mme. Irene Hermes, closed 
the show, and held the house. Two women, 
very nicely formed, pose in the nude, with 
gold and marble make-up, -and one man* 
a- la Adam, . with, .'marble make-up, too. 
The poses are artistic and well done. 
■: 0£p 'I* m \\ ■' G.J.H. 



EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 

The show began with the showing of a 
feature comedy and a news reel. 

The first act on the program was The 
Four Meyakos, billed as a surprise from 
the Orient, which it is indeed. The writer 
has seen many Japanese risley performers, 
but. never any who could do anything In 
addition. The surprise in the act. is the 
ability of the girls, who do the risley, to 
play musical instruments, and to sing and 
dance, a la "Americanaise." 

Masters and Kraft have a rather amus- 
ing satire on the dance, past, present, and 
future. They open with a number in 
which they explain the purpose of their 
act, and follow with their conception of 
the dance, teams as they worked thirty 
years ago. Next. is their' idea of how the 
dancing man performs today. They close 
with a rather prophetic burlesque on the 
futurist vaudevillian. They provided quite 
a few laughs, and showed a variety of 
difficult steps that the folks seemed to ap- 
preciate. 

Marshal Montgomery, kingpin of the old 
boys among ventriloquists, waa third. He 
is assisted hy Edna Courtney, who does her 
little quite well. The act is elaborately 
staged, and well worked out. Montgomery 
works in evening dress, and the scene rep- 
resents a dining room, with a piano set 
in it for- extra atmosphere. Montgomery 
does- all of his old tricks, such as drink- 
ing, eating, smoking, and -what not, while 
manipulating his dummy. He scored heav- 
ily, and had to respond to an encore, for 
which he offered his time worn, though still 
interesting, whistling bit ' This went over 
very nicely. 

The vaudeville was continued by Travers 
and Douglas assisted by Louis Theil, in 
their humorous little playlet "Morninglory." 
The act is built up around the effect* of 
a smart salesman's new advertising scheme. 
He sends friendly love letters to school 
teachers extolling the wonders of bis soap 
"Morninglory." These are worded so as 
to please and yet to make the reader 
wonder what they are all about. He sends 
two to a little school teacher, and when 
the village censors open them, — rgood night ! 
She loses her job. Enter the guilty sales- 
man who tells all about himself. He learns 
of the trouble he has caused, and soon 
rights things by his knowledge of the do- 
ings of the village deacons when they reach 
the big city. 

The Dixie Duo, Sisale and Blake, came' 
next, with a classy song and piano offer- 
ing. These boys. two. clever colored en- 
tertainers, have the goods, and. send them 
over the footlights in regular big time style. 
They offer a number of Dixie and "Blues" 
melodies, in a manner peculiarly their own. 
The songs 'are catchy, and of the lasting 
impression kind. The best number in the 
act, however, is the one in which Lieut. 
Sisale depicts the taking of a patrol across 
"No Man's Land." This earned the first 
of their three encores. They have a sure 
fire applause and encore getter. 

"The Rainbow Cocktail" is an unusual 
musical act in that it has no comedians 
and no widows who are looking for hus- 
bands. It is a strictly singing act except 
for a few dance steps to offset the 
monotony. The piece has to do with a wiz- 
ard who can rejuvenate .old people. Sev- 
eral old time performers come to him, and 
he makes them young again. Among 
those who came were one of the original 
"Flora-Dora" girls, the three little school 
girls from Mikado, The Merry Widow, and 
the original ballet girl. Of course he makes 
them all young again, and he himself be- 
comes a youth once more. The ending of 
the act is a spectacular riot of colors. 
The act is well named. 

Following an intermission, the feature 
picture, "The Virtuous Thief* ' with Enid 
Bennett was shows, S. K. 



BUSHW1CK 

Clifton Crawford, who was billed as 
headliner, was suddenly taken ill on Mon- 
day afternoon and could not appear. Lew 
Dockstader was called down at the last 
minute from the Orpheum and filled in for 
him. 

Kinograma, which have been shown at 
the close of the show throughout the Bum- 
mer, occupied the opening. place on the bill 
following the overture. Andy Byrne and 
his.. orchestra are back at this house and 
jazzed . all of their selections with a lot 
of pep, despite the extreme heat of the 
day. 

Camilla's -Birds followed the news reel. 
The birds .are a species of " Australian 
Cockatoos, 'that are well- trained and do 
their .work well The bits offered .are the 
regular routine of birds- acts,, consisting 
of such stunts as chariot work,' rolling a 
ball, and a fire scene. The act pleased 
and was' accorded a good hand. - 

Raymond and Sch ram found the second 
spot to .their, liking with, a number of 
songs which they delivered well. Schram 
up to recently, did an act somewhat on 
the style of this one with Lieut Arm- 
strong: The two open with' a number 
which tells about one of them having been 
a lieutenant in the army and the other a 
private. Two popular numbers follow, and 
they then render a medley of jaxs and 
operatic tunes with a word parody that 
shows the competition between these two 
kinds of musi Other bits have been 
heard on the same' style, but this one is 
unusually clever and is arranged nicely. 
They took. an encore. 

Eddie Barto and -Florence Clark, as 
Columbia and Victor, offered a song and 
dance skit The scene- is laid in a phono- 
graph and piano store in which two large 
and two small _ phonographs are discovered, 
in addition to two pianos. After some pat- 
ter and a song from the two large phono- 
graphs, Barto and Clark come from their 
respective machines. The patter contains 
a few good gags and a few poor ones. The 
singing and dancing of the pair is very 
good, but, 'with this exception, the act is 
not np to the standard of quality that the 
audience is led to expect from the "clever 
and unusual opening. But some revision 
cf the- poor .spots in the offering would 
make it a real big time offering. 

A. Robins, the "walking music-store." 
and his partner, the latter an attractive 
woman who plays an accompaniment to 
Robins, gave a very good account of them- 
selves. The various comic apparatus and 
the large number of articles in his pockets, 
brongbt laugh after laugh. from the audi- 
ence. His imitations of various musical in- 
struments are very good. 

Kohlmar and Company offered a pleas- 
ing sketch of Jewish life that was excel- 
lently handled. The' playlet is clever and 
•is out of the ordinary run of vaudeville 
sketches. 'The offering gave a very good 
.account of itself here. 

Lew Dockstader walked on while most of 
the audience were walking out, for the pro- 
gram had led them to expect intermission. 
They returned to their seats, however and 
Dockstader had them all laughing at his 
eulogy to the departed John Barleycorn, 
and at a number of other gags. 

Following a film showing Pershing's ar- 
rival came Florrie Millership and Alfred 
Gerrard. Assisted by Eddie Moron at the 
piano, they offered, a number of songs and 
dances which were delivered ip their usual 
clever manner. The pair have unusual 
personalities, and gained instant favor. 
Miss MfUersnip is featuring, for her song 
number, one of Lou Pollock's Lew oriental 
numbers, and the manner in which she 
delivered it was excellent 

Morgan and Kloter, two girls, followed 
and received a generous amount of ap- 
plause. The two sing, well and have a 
good variety of songs. But the comedy has 
much room for improvement 

Great Koban and Company (Japanese), 
closed the show with a very good exhibi- 
tion of Risley, acrobatic and various other 
feats. ' . O. J. H". 



CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 




HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

TA <"** *•*>.?. *i f . AT 

Opening act* displaying originality are few 
and far between. Therefore, til* Brighton* 
deserve modi credit for 1 their dexterity In 
patching colored cloths together so that they 
form Interesting; pletnrea that are pot to- 
gether as quickly tint the audience hai no 
chance to become restless or bored. They 
are adepts In their work and have a torn 
that lends color to any Mil. The reception 
Of the act, however, was only lake warm. 

Earl BlcarU food the next (Pot even 

colder. In bis Imitation of Al Jolson, bat 
gats everything Into It except personality and 
the ability to pat the song over. Nor does 
he fare nraeh better when he tries to render 
other number* la his own way, depending 
entirely too much upon the orchestra and 
the melody* to carry his songs through and 
entirely too little upon the way be sings 
them. His oversea* stories are 1 oat a little 
better than his singing, hot audience* are 
growing tiled of the "Over There" stuff; 
vaudeville has become saturated with it. 

iBlcard'a constant sUnalons to the "em- 
pire" of a ban game, must have crated upon 
the ears of those who know anything at an 
about correct B-igHah. which la, maybe, the 
reason that, as he ssys himself, when he 
played before the King of England, the King 
gave him half an hoar to get oat of the coon- 
try. 

"The Woman Eternal" Is a well worked-oat 
playlet that holds Interest from beginning to 
end both because the plot grips and because 
the acting la above the ordinary found In 
playlet*. The acting of the wife is particu- 
larly worthy of mention: she has been for- 
tunate enough to have exceptionally good 
lines to read and abe knows bow to get them 
across most effectively. She i* never 
"stagey** and has a natural way of speak- 
ing that many actr esse s would do wen to 
cultivate. Her support la good. In the 
"dream*' scene* where she fondles the Jewels, 
she should work more toward the center* of 
the stage, for, as It is now, the audience on 
the right side of the house cannot see what 
abe is doing for more than a minute. 

O'Connor and Dixon know bow to get 
laughs and demonstrated this once again on 
Thur sd ay night: Their fooUabneaa reaches 
the nth degree at times. Bat the audience 
like* it; so whafs the oddst 

Janet of France, with her pianist, is remi- 
niscent of the days of Melville Ellis snd Irene 
Bordonl, and, while they lack the finesse of 
these old headline's, the act is, at least, 
novel. 

Big laagbs were scored by J. C. Mack and 
Company, particularly in the scene where 
the foolish boy asks his mother bow she 
was courted by bis dad. The act runs away 
from the conventional and finds the going 

H. J. G. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



M 



FLATBUSH 

(Last Half) 

Jerome and Newell scored In first place 
with, a novel oriental acrobatic bit. The 
two men worked wen together, and.- barring 
a few attempts at humor, ought, with a little 
more work, find the better small time easy 
going. 

Hampton and Blake, In second spot, did 
not do so well. Their'* Is a typical null 

time act and la lacking In action and unity. 
Their gags are not all new and some of them 
did not get over. They would do well to 
secure some new materia!. 

Martha Hamilton and Company, next, of- 
fered a clever skit, the plot of which deal* 
with poker and the instalment man. The 
husband, who - makes a good salary, turns 
it an over to bis wife, who in turn secretly 
looses all playing poker. As a result, every- 
thing In the house has been bought on the 
instalment plan and all the tradesmen are 
creditors. There sre some clever spots and 
an abundance of humorous situations. The 
closing Is ' decidedly weU done, setting forth 
a double moral, first, for the husband always 
to be the family cashier, second, for the wife 
never to play poker. 

Emma Stevens, soprano, imitating ' an 
operatic star, wag next on the bill. Her. 
voice Is not always true in the upper regis- 
ter. Nevertheless, her song cycle was well 
chosen and ber plano-logue scored appianse. 

She took an encore and sang a timely blue 
song about rent profiteering. 

Ellis and Irwin, in closing place, scored. 
They have a clever act which, at the start. 
leads the audience to believe. that .they are 
worse than they really are. It later de- 
velops Into a good song and talk bit. The 
men stork smoothly, but would do well to 
tone down their singing snd speaking voices. 



FIFTH AVE. 

(Last Half) 

Mabel Burke, back after her vacation, 
started the show off with an animated sons;. 

The Four Cliffords, a colored quartet, two 
men and two women, presented a song and" 
dance act that -was well liked. 

The Barry Girl* offered a sonar and talk 

act that was good in spots only. The torn 
Is modelled after me usual sister act and 
started with a double song In which they 
Introduced themselves, after which came 
some talk that was nicely put over, one of 
the girls, the toner one, loaning the other 
about a gentleman friend of hers. There was 
then a song and dance by the shorter girl, 
followed by an Irish number by the other. 
The -•"-*■■> dance, In attractive costumes, 
would have been better without the few bits 
of patter employed by one of. the girls. 

Prank Mullane sang a few songs and told 
several stories which provoked mirth. 

Walters and Walters, a man. and woman 
team of ventriloquists, have an offering that 
la a novelty as far as such acts go. The 
spectacle of two ventriloquists working to- 
gether Is "a unique one and, since both are 
clever and' the material used Is up to the 
mark, the of fer ing u entertaining 

Rudlnoff started by making one of his 

"smoke pictures," delivered a good deal of 
patter and imitated some birds. His offer- 
ing; will be reviewed In the new act and 

re-appearance department. 

Bits Could Is back after entertaining' the 
boys In France and Al Mitchel, an ex-dough- 
boy assists her at the piano. They will be 
fully reviewed In the New Act- department. 

Frank Stafford, in. his Rip Van Winkle 
travesty, held the interest of the audience. 
His assssssl and bird imitations were liked. 
* Iforan and Mack are a duo of blackface 
comedians who have a collection of gags and 
other comedy bits which they make sure nre. 
An of their material Is handled In a manner 
almost flawless. .They scored a tremendous 
hit. 

'Bound Travers and Company In a novel 
offering that Included a varied collection of 
stunts closed and held the crowd in nntll 
the finish. I. 8. 



M 



AMERICAN 

(Last Half) 

Stanley opened the afternoon performance 
with a number of equllibrlBtlc feats which 
be did well. 

McAvoy and Brooks, man and woman, the 
former exceedingly tall and the other very 
abort. In comparison, offered some singing 
and patter. The singing can only be termed 
fair, and the patter Is very poor. The ma- 
terial, also, Is in decided need of a good 
deal of improvement. 

The Five Fetrovas. whose special . curtain 
gave the name of "The Patrowars," followed 
a two-reel western fllnr with a novel strong 
man act; The company, consisting of three 
men and two women, has an attractive spe- 
cial set and also a very good routine of feats. 

Win and alary Sogers gave a good account 
of themselves with a pleasing, comedy., skit 
in one and also Old a song and dance. The 
patter' has a. .number ox* fairly good gags 
but the laughs come mainly because, of ' the 
manner In" which they are 1 delivered. ■"' • 

Grace Carlisle and Jules Homer offered 
some singing and . Instruments! work that 
waa very well done. This audience, as a 
rule, does not cater to the classic style of 
material, and yet this - act -was accorded a 
very big hand. Miss Carlisle rendered two 
numbers vocally snd did them well. Romer 
offered a few selections at the piano, and the 
violin. He rendered three solos In succes- 
sion on the latter Instrument. Three solos 
In sucesalon are rather tiresome to a vaude- 
ville audience, especially as they are an of 
the same variety.' A song between two of 
them would aid a great deal. 

Plunkett and Sates can greatly improve 
their offering by either eliminating most of 
the potter- or getting new material. The act, 
for the moat part, consists of dancing, which 
Is nicely done. The young man's eccentric 
dance went very well. 

Sam Howard and Company offered a 
comedy playlet which, as a whole, can only 
be caned ordinary. There are quite a few 
weak spots In the offering that need strength- 
ening and the acting also leaves a good deal 
to be desired The sketch has a' Very good 
line for the finish, which sends it off to a 
big hand. G. J. H. 



PROCTOR'S 12STH STREET 

(Last Half) 

' Ralph and Mays, man and woman, opened 
with a juggling skit. See New Acta. 

Theresa Quadri offered a song cycle and 
was taken ont after the matinee performance. 

BUner Foblo wag taken off in the midst, of 

bis act. 

Miss liUotte. assisted by an unbilled com- 
pany of two men, offered a sketch and went 
fairly weS. See New Acta. 

Snsanne Simpson came on with medals 
pinned an over her dress. She lasted for 
two numbers on the piano. 

Jules and Annette Garrison pleased with 
their comedy offering. Garrison should curb 
his inclination to recite, for. as a whole, bis 
material Is fairly good. Hiss Garrison Is 
an exceptionally well-built attractive woman 
and looks very wen in an her costumes. She 
sings pleasingly and could render one or two 
more numbers. 

De Loreh and Hclstnrin, two colored men 
With extra blacking offered a comedy skit 
and gave a good account of themselves, flee 
New Acta. 

Anthony has Improved Ms offering since 
reviewed' under New Acts, by cutting down 
on the whistling and putting in another num- 
ber with the accordeon. He can still improve 
It by the. addition of more, numbers. He 
went well here. 

Wynt and Wynton offered some patter, 
singing and dancing. The pair are w^giiab 
and plainly proved that they have the re- 
puted English sense of humor. Americans 
win never rave over English acts If this 
team Is a sample. Bee New Acta. - 

Rogers and Iain, two men, through con- 
stant Jockeying, took a large number of bows. 
One of the team takes off the role of a He- 
brew comedian and doei It lust like the 

average boy at a party would. The other 
la a faivly good straight and sings well. 

BlUle Seaton, assisted by a pianist, offered 
a pleasing ' routine of songs. Miss Seaton is 
an attractive girl, sings well and handles her 
numbers nicely. The pianist assists capably. 

Eva Faye. playing -a full week stand .at 
this house, offered her mind-reading act and 
proved that Barnnm waa right. 

Jimmey Lncas, assisted by Joe Hall, closed 
the show with bis "nut" offering and not 
only held them but went over for a big 
hand, G. J. H. 



AUDUBON 

(Last Half) 
Chljo and Chl]o, man and woman Japs, 
followed the opening films with an acrobatic 
and dancing offering of merit. The acrobatic 
portion, done by the man, consists Of a num- 
ber of very good' equillbrlstlc stunts. The 
dancing*, which for the most part is done 
by the woman, also Is very good. One ec- 
centric dance which she did received a very 
large amount of appianse. ■'-»" 
..Jack Marley . offered a monologue that" 
started with some poor gags, but •■ rapidly 
improved as his offering went on. He has 
a lot of new material about the actor's strike 
snd' other up-to-date ' topics. There are. 
however, a few gaga In his offering that are 
decidedly suggestive and should be omitted. 
He 'closed with two patriotic recitations 
which ' were not necessary to get him a big 



■ Al H. White and Company, the latter not 
being billed, offered a pleasing comedy 
sketch of Jewish life which went over - very 
wen The playlet Is . well-written, and 
handled excellently by a capable cast, 

"Willie Solar followed the news reel -with 
.his eccentric song; offering. He has a man- 
ner of delivery that is sure fire and proved 
It here. He stopped the show after rendering 
bis "Aba -Dabs" number and dance, which 
he did exceedingly welL , 

Basil Lynn and Company ire nsing Lynn's 
"Racey Conversation" ~ which he and Mayo 
offered on the big time. Lynn has a new 
partner ■ who ' handles-, -his end., of the offer- 
ing capably. The -new.' man sings well and 
is entitled to equal "billing with Lynn. The 

act went big here. "'-' 

Ten Eyck and Wiley Company closed the 
show with an artistic dance offering.' Some 
of the costuming is startling, but, aa a whole, 
the offering la very artistic. They have a 
very good conservatory set, In the center of 
which Is a marble fountain, with streams 
of -water playing: on" an electric bulb. The 
dancing is done by' Ten Eyck and' Wiley, 
man and womarLT ' ' ■ ' '~.G. J. H. 



METROPOLITAN 

U.l(L«tHalO i 

The musical Chrystlss, man. and woman, 
opened the show with .their well known in- 
strumental offering. The a'cv. has been 
padded out with a lot of comedy talk which 
fell rather, flat. Their playing' waa very 
good and they scored heavily with It. They 
opened with a French horn and saxapbone 
selection and closed with a double xylophone 
number. 

Smith and Baker have an ordinary sing- 
ing and piano act. As the young lady at 
the piano truthfully admitted, she can not 
sing nor dance, but abe plays her piano well 
enough to get along. The man has a pleas- 
ing singing voice and his numbers were well 
put over. His last, an . imitation of Jimmy 
Hussey, ' although not announced - as such, 
was received with favor, 

Morgan and Gray have a comedy offering 

which they put over very nicely. Their 
skit, for such it is. Is of the domestic' 
comedy type with a lazy husband and a 

faithful wife as the characters. The wife 
attempts, many times, to get her husband 
off to work. When he finally decides to get 
up, he finds that he Is late and. In his harry 
to get dressed, gets himself Into a hopeless 
tangle. Finally extricating himself and 
running to work, he discovers he' has no 
money. After a morning of strife and hurry, 
be finds that, it la Sunday and- he doesn't 
have to go to work. Their lines are. very 
funny and . they put them 'over as well as 
any one could wish. 

Sc hwann and Clifford are still doing 'their 
weU known comedy act. Their turn consists 
of a number of bite of business, clever gags, 
snd songs, which are put together in a mess 
and dished up a la carte for the audiences 
approval. They scored a hit and had to take 
an encore. Schwartz, la a good Jew comedian 
and has every reason for being. Miss Clif- 
ford sang well. »'" 

"Cairo" is supposed to be a wonderful 
spectacular act • and, ' when It began. It 
looked like It, with, oriental scenery, heavy 
atmosphere and deep chanting. When It had 
been on for about ten minutes, it proved a 
miserable fliile. The only redeeming feature 
of the act Is the singing of the tall fellow, 
who possesses -a pleasing baritone voice. 

"Bin. Henry," with Charles Bay, was the 

feature picture. ' S. K. 

KEENEY'S 
(LautHalf) 

Jewel and Raymond, who have been seen 
hereabouts under the name of Dorothy and 
Buster., offered their boy and girl tdnglng 
and comedy act. They scored a decided hit 
with their offering, which makes a good 
opening act. 

Charles and Anna Glocker, billed as the 
original water swingers, presented their well 
known novelty offering in which everything 
from a glass to a bucket of water la swung. 
The brunt of the work falls to Charles, who 
doesn't seem to mind it at all. 'They scored 

a huge bit, the end of their act putting them 

over with a real big bang. ,„., ,-j,, ■ 

..'Ward and Warden, -. .two .-'men .in comedy, 
tomfoolery followed and auceeded in win- 
ning numerous laughs. Their 'material le. 
for the most part, stmppy", 'wUh^nst enough 
spice in it to make 1 It .tasty to : the average 
vaudeville audience... They nut their material 
across in a smooth eass, way. that is. sure to 
please. . '.■"-.'.,' .«*....» . /..« ' . ; fc 

An Interruption was^ offered' here In the 
way of a Hearat-Pathe news reel. 

Anger and Packer, man and woman, in a 
.comedy »*-~*r l *'g ' and - talking ' set? ; continued 
the vaudeville where, it had been left off. 
Their act consists of. several small bits of 
business and a number < of mpld 'crossfire re- 
marks' which they exchange. One. or two of 
them could be eliminated without harming 
the act. They closed with some Binging 
which was well liked. They scored a good 
sized hit. . ■.• -v ',$';, 

.."Prosperity" is a one act "morality, playlet 
in which the author has attempted to teach 
the. lesson of .thrift as the only meins to 
real success. The act la well written ' ami 
played.. The., dialogue Is Interesting. The 
audience admitted toe -value ,, of the act by 
its 'appianse, which' waslou'diand unstinted. 

Boyle and Brazil claim to be Into. of "Chin 

Chin."" They offered a neat dancing act 
which was received with favor by the" audi- 
ence.--' ■■-.' ■■'■ '.:■•"-■ • "■ ■ : .. '^js ■ '■''» 

"The Owl Club" a three man Singing act, 
closed the bill. Why they, bare selected this 
name or why they .take up seven nMnutes 
of time in some useless- business, is a mys- 
tery. . But when, they , get down to. , brass 
tacks they/. put across a" rather, good 'sincinK 
"act. 5 -"Tile White Heather"" was the .'feature 
act. ■■:-■ '■■ ■-'■■.■*■"'■.. ■■ ■■...■■'--. ■"■ ■".•■-■ ';-& K. 



September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



n 




RITA. GOULD 

4Kieatre-4WA. Avenue. K **»'•■ . ■'} . . 

Style— Singing and talking. ' 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting— In one. 

Rita Gould, billed -as the girl whom 
tbe soldi era in France knew aa "Sis Rita 
of the A. E. F." is back, from Europe 
with a song and talk act. Her work in 
connection with the Over There The- 
atre League does not seem to hare 
dimmed her spirit in any way and, aa 
a result, her performance has the same 
big kick behind It. And a kick in these 

■ dry times is a thing much to be desired. 

She started with a bit of patter and 

- men went into a "Pane" aongv Another 
song number followed, she adapting for 
her use a piece usually sung by men. 
Some talk in which she introduced Al 

- Mitchel, who accompanied her upon the 
piano, as a former soldier, was followed 

■ by another song and then a dance. There 

- was a jassy song and then one of Al 
Jolson's "Sinbad" hits, to close. 

Miss Gould's reappearance here was 

- a success, and she will probably have 
little trouble in the two-a-day. Her 
manner la forward bat ehe la the type 

'. of woman performer, who Is nsnslly sue- 
SjSiaMC Her style is somewhat JMJfcg 
to Belle Baker's. She knows bow to 
torn the sentiment of an audience her 
way. and tbe fact that she did her bit by 
entertaining the soldiers should Increase 
her drawing powers. 18. 

YVONNE AND COMPANY 

T hea tre— H artem Opera House. 
Style— Psaofag. 
Time— Fifte e n min ute* . 

Setting— Putt itage (special). 

Yvonne and Company would be better 
billed If their notices read Yvonne and 
Kobeloff, for Constantina Kobeloff, who 
formerly appeared with Mile. Dssie, does ' 
just as much work as the young lady. 
The ' remainder of the company la a 
violinist who directs from the o r che str a 
Pit 

Yvonne opens with a toe-dance in 
which she is assisted by Kobeloff. A 
Banian eccentric dance by Kobeloff fol- 
lowa While the dance is good, Kobeloff 
has done better. A toe-jass dance, some- 
what' on the style- of Mile. Dasie'a fol- 
lows, by the young lady. Tbe violinist 
then renders a solo and another dance 

- by Yvonne and Kobeloff completes the 
' offering.' - 

The setting is good, but Yvonne would 
do well to get some kind of covering far 

- the stage, the bareness of which takes 
away from the effect of her curtain. 
The costumes are pretty and tbe danc- 
ing good.- Tbe act, at present, Is a bit 
tough' In spots and win need a i few 
weeks to get smoothed out. A little more 
length to the routine win also help. 
With: these changes made, tbe act. should 
Play the big time houses. G. J. H. 

JACKSON HINES 

. Theatre— Harlem Open Home. 

Style B ine in o. 

Time— Tieelve minute*. 

Setting— In one. 

Jackson Hines is a well appearing 
baritone who sings a repertoire of wisely 
chosen m elodies. He has a good voice, 
pleasing personality and renders his 
numbers nicely. His budget of songs 
is somewhat short and the piece which 
he need to finish, off. with at this bouse 
did not make a very good, closing. 
Otherwise he should have little tronbls 
in reaching the two-a-day houses. 
- Hines led off with a "Pal" song, put- 
tins it over in line shape. He followed 
with another well-known piece, "On 
tbe ' Boad to . Mandalay," - and elosed 
with a new "Frenchle* song. He re- 
ceived a big hand at the close of his 
offering, but declined an encore: He 
could easily have taken one or mora, 
however. f, 8. 



wlSfr 



**• 



|new ACTS AND J*£APPEARAN 



BilSS L1LLOTTE. 

Theatre— Proctor' t 125th St. 

Style — Sketch. 

Tbattr-Simteen minute*. 

Setting — Foil stage. 

Although billed as Miss LUlotte, the 
young lady in this act is supported .by a 
company of .two men, one of whom is 
entitled to equal billing , with her. 
The scene is laid in a dining room 
. where a burglar has just been caught by 
the young lady, who lives in the bouse. 
She sympathizes with him and he tells 
her a hard-luck story about her father, 
who had"- made him a pauper and that he 
had to. have money to get oat West to 
a pal of his who was in trouble. She 
tells him she will loan him the money. 
He lays his gun down and she gets it. 
She then holds him np and sends for 
the police. He calls her- a lot of names 
. which imply a great deal, and in fact, are 
greatly rrrcrdone. He then tells her that, 
in spite), of the fact that she holds a 
loaded gun in her hand, be is going to 
Walk out of the room and that she will 
be- too much of a coward to shoot him. 
After calling her a few more names, he 
walks out. Curtain. • 

We wffl let the reader Judge the plot 
for Mmajft, But the skit has much room 
for improvement There are too many 
petty | compliments which pass between 
- the two and the offering drags a good 
deal' throughout. The acting can be 
termed only fair. . G. J. H. 

. PRINCESS NAI TA1 TA I 

Theatre — Yonker*. 

Style—Singing. 

Time — Twice missies. 

Setting — At one. . 

The Princess is a very attractive look- 
ing young lady who closely resembles 
Fay Balntcr in "Bast Is West" Al- 
though she sings and speaks without an 
accent (for which the average audience 
should and win, be grateful), she claims 
to be a real live Chinese,' add, in a little 
announcement which she makes in tbe 
midst of her program, tells the audience 
that she was educated in England and 
lived there since she wag ten years old. 
. While her voice is not powerful, it haa 
a pleasing quality which wffl get her 
over In .vaudeville. She offered a num- 
ber of popular jazs and ballad numbers. 
When reviewed, she stopped the show, 
and the writer, who haa watched this 
Yonkers' audience at different tunes, win 
say that is something to boast of. The 
. Princess should find it easy going in the 
better class of small tune. G. J. H. 



"BEGINNING OF WORLD" 

Theatre — Eigkiv-firwt Bt. 

Style— Dancing and color efect*. 

Time — Twelve minute*. 

Setting— Special. . ., 

"The Beginning of the World" Is an 
interpretive dancing act, the most Impor- 
tant part of which appears to be the 
color effect scheme employed. There is 
a. screen- and the colors are flashed upon 
it from behind. Just what it is supposed 
to represent would be difficult to under- 
' stand, were it not for the explanation 
upon the program. It is difficult at 
times tor see the dancer. The offering la 
a novel one, however, and win And work. 
The girl who does the dancing repre- 
' senta the spirit of color, who returns 
from the earth to the sea of color, hear- 
ing an empty cup. This has been emp- 
tied by supplying the world with splen- 
did colors, taken from the Sea. She 
vanishes into the sea when there is a 
revelry of color. In the [morning . she 
emerges, with her cap filled and goes 
forth to' supply the world with her tints 
once more. x. 8. 



FREDERICK AND RAYNOR 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Comedy playlet. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting — Full itage. 

"You're Name Again, Dear," ie the 

title of this playlet, presented by a man 

. and woman. The offering is a satire on 

the eternal triangle and not very well 

. written. The principals also handle the 
. vehicle poorly with the result that there 
arc places where it completely fails to 
hold interest. There is nothing excep- 
tional about tbe theme, but with bright 
lines and a few clever situations, it 
might be acceptable. 

The story concerns a man who, in a 
somewhat intoxicated condition, enters 
a lady's apartment through the window. 
The inmate of tbe apartment appears, 
excited and soliloquizing. She remarks 
that aha will marry the first man she 
meets. Then she suddenly discovers the 
man in her apartment. She orders him 
to leave, but then changes her mind, and 
he is called back, and she offers him a 
position as her "husband" at $500 per 
month, explaining that he is to act. In 
that capacity in public only. 

It is made known through bits of pat- 
ter that ehe wants to use him to pro- 
voke jealousy in another man, who haa 
broken an appointment with her. A 
telegram- from the latter, in which a sat- 
isfactory explanation is given for hav- 
ing broken tbe engagement, then ar- 
rives, after which the man who broke 
into her apartment Is ordered to leave 
and is "discharged" from his position as 
husband. 

He reads the telegram through, discov- 
ers that the sender, whom he knows, is 
not tefflng the truth, and wins the girl 
when he proves that the other is faith- 
less. La 



ZOTTI AND PINTEL 

Theatre— Eigktvfint Bt. 

Style — MvtioaL 

Time — Twelve minute*. . 

Setting— Four (Special). 

When reviewed, this act was seen at 
a disadvantage, as It closed the bill, in 
which spot it was misplaced. Boainna 
Zotti. evidently an Italian prima donna, 
assisted by Jagues Pintel, at the piano,' 
Is offering a high-class singing act that 
would do for a number two or three 
spot on a big time bin. 

She opens with TJn Bel dl Yedjremo" 
in Italian, from Puccini's "Madams But- 
terfly," which she sang well, although 
' the piece la a trifle long for an opening 
number.' Pintel; then, offered a piano 

, solo while she changed from the costume 

of a Geisha girl into evening gown. Her 
second song was a coloratura number, 
which she rendered equally well. Her 
last number consisted of two verses 
from "Comin' Thru the Bye." 

S. K. 



DeLORCH AND MCLAURIN. 

Theatre— Proctor', 125t* Bt. 

Style — Black-face. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting—/* one. 

Two colored men using extra blacking, 

After the "Bosery" is beard off-stage; 

the drop rises on' two "coons ' shooting 

' craps. Tie opening, while old, is don* 
wen and won them immediate favor. 
After some patter, a song by tbe pair is 
offered. The men have good voices which 
they use to better advantage by leaving 
out the throaty rumble which they put 
into most of their singing. More patter, 
a song and dance completes offering. 
The patter needs improvement in spots, 
but the offering will do for the three-s- 
day. G. J. H. 






FRANK STAFFORD AND CO. 

Tneatxs^ffoiW i ^ e r. Bo %fi. i * p 
Style— Fantattic playlet. 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

"XHunter'g Game" is the title of this 
sketch, which is a sort of allegorv built 
on Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle 
story. A great portion of the offer- 
ing consists of imitations of various 
animals and birds. Although there are 
a few place* where the torn lags, for 

. the greater part '. it holds interest, is 
nicely staged and should be able to play 
the ' better small time with success. - 

The torn starts when a number of 
elides, commenting lightly on Rip Van 
Winkle's • experiences, are flashed upon 

' the screen. Stafford follows them, com- 
ing out with a dog. The rest of the 
offering consists of some talk and imi- 
tations of various animals. Rip is sup- 
posed to fall asleep after meeting one 
of the mountain men who offers him a 
drink from a large keg. In his dream 
he meets an Indian girl whom he in- 
terests with his bird imitations. He 
leaves and later wakes up, twenty years 
older. " 

The turn ends when he remarks that 
he is going home to face the music 

L 8. 



SAILOR LANN1NC 

Theatre— Proctor-* 136th Street. 
Style— Imitation*. 
Time — Ten minute*. 
Setting—/* Uoo and one. 

With the drop in two, a phonograph 
is disclosed, from which some unintel- 
ligible singing and talking issue. While 
it cannot be understood, it sounds- Hke 
the old style phonograph, and, after a 
minute or so, Sailor T^imt„g comes 
from the phonograph box with a hand- 
kerchief in his mouth. The opening, 
although it is being used by some, is a 
novelty, for it haa not been seen around 
the city. 

The drop in one is then let down and 
running proceeds to do a few whistling 
imitations, some of which resemble 
those of the Arnant Brothers ia the 
"Bevo" whistle. He then does a few 
other imitations, including those of a 
crying baby and an aeroplane. The 
latter is something new. After a yodel- 
ling song, he closes with the phonograph 
imitation with which he opened. 

Lanning has a abort routine, but does 
bis work wen. He should get plenty 
of work along the three-a-day route. 

a j. h 

ALLMAN AND NALLY 

Theatre— Yonker*. 

StyW-Talking ami tinging. 
Time— Fourteen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

Jack AUman, recently of Arnold and 
Allman, is now doing most of the act 
which he did with Rena Arnold, with a 
new young lady named MaretU NeJJy 
as partner. 

The opening ' of the other act, in 
which the girl flirts with AUman, is 
still retained. But, towards the Utter 
part of tbe act, most of the material 
baa been changed, new songs and gags' 
being put in. Also one or two bits done 
by Miss Arnold are not done by W*M 
Nally, but she does other things vary 
nicely to make up for them. 

While Miss Nally is not a dough and 
tumble comedienne of Miss Arnold's 
type, she has a very pleasing personal- 
ity and handles her lines excellently. 
She also sings well, and, in fact, gives 
aR the support that could be desired to 
Allman 

The turn has been vastly improved 
and should hold an early spot on a big 
time bill without difficulty. G. J. H. • 



12 



THE NEW : :Y O R K C L I PP E R 



September 10, 1919 



FOREIGN NEWS 



ERROL TO STAT IN ENGLAND 
AND PRODUCE FOR DECOURVILLE 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 



COMBINE OF STOCK MANAGERS 
AGAIN RUMORED ON B'DWAY 



American Comedian Also Has Offers from Sir Alfred Butt and 

Is Ackne wledged Cleverest Man in West End— Feud with 

Rohey Makes Him London Favorite. 



London, Eng.,. Sept 6.— From present 
indications, it looks as though Leon 
Errol. popular American comedian and 
producer, is to become a London fixture 
for some time to come, despite the fact' 
of his reposed engagement by Flo Zieg- 
feld for a New. York revue. Sir Alfred 
Butt is seeking, his services as a pro- 
ducer and has offered him a good contract. 

But Errol Is - now under contract to 
Albert DeCourvQle and his associated in- 
terests and it . is doubtful whether he 
will allow Errol to produce for a rival 
management and ' appear in the Hippo- 
drome productions at the same time. 
' DeCourville's stand ih the matter will 
not be known until Th is return from 
France, but it is expecVcd £hat he will 
most likely retain Errol's services, as two 
road companies which Errol .rehearsed 
were, so well liked that the Moss Em- 
pires,. Ltd., for whom they were pro- 
duced, and the Hippodrome management, 
have decided .to _ keep him under cover 
for future uses, as a revue producer, v . 

This condition of affairs was brought 



about through the professional jealousy 
of George Bobey, who was appearing in 
the same revue with Errol. Bobey in- 
sisted that Errol's part be cut down to 
seven minutes and forty-one seconds, or 
he would leave the show. The manage- 
ment did not want to lose either Errol 
or Rohey, so matters were settled to 
satisfy the latter. Errol is drawing down 
$1,750 for his London appearance, but' 
Rohey ig the big drawing card of the 
revue, so there was no other course open 
to the management. • 

The f ued between ' Enrol and Eobey 
aroused Errol to put his best efforts into 
the production of the Moss revues and 
he startled London's theatrical world. 
Today Errol is acknowledged as "the 
cleverest man in the West- End," and the 
conservatives of theatricaldom, who are 
many, have requested ttim to consider 
Hobey's ' attitude as a purely personal 
one and not as an expression of the gen- 
eral feeling- of English professionals, -who 
are trying to create a' feeling of brother- 
hood between American and English per- 
formers. 



BANVARDS PERFORM FOR KING 

London, Eng., .Sept. 8,-r-The -Plying 
Banvards, an American novelty act, headed 
a special performance attended by the 
King, and Queen, which was given upon 
royal command in celebration of peace 
here recently. The proceeds of the per- 
formance were donated to the Variety 
Artists Benevolent Fund,: which maintains 
a home for the care of infirm . variety 
artists. 

The feature of the performance was a 
Pageant of Peace, presented by about 1,500 
people, including the Royal Trumpeters. 
Variety artists who took part in the pro- 
gram '■ are ' The Flying Banvards, Ernest 

Hastings, Rohey and Loraine, Sam Bar- 
ton, Arthur Prince and "Jim*' Harry Tate, 
who is also well known to American audi- 
ences, Clarice Mm and "That,** Crock 
and Partner, DuCalion. The King and 
Qneen were especially pleased with the per- 
formance of The Banvards. 



CHARLOT PRODUCES "BRAN-PIE'' 

London, Eng., Sept 5.— Andre Chariot 
has just produced a new. two-act revue 
called "Bran Pie," at- the. Prince of Wales 
Theatre, which hag been redecorated and 
remodeled. The piece, which is a success, 
is being enacted by the following company : 
Jack Hulbert Jose DeMoreas, The Two 
Bobs, Odette Myrtle, Phyllis Titmua and 
Beatrice Lillie. 



WRITING PLAY ON CROMWELL 

London, Eng., Sept. 5.-^John Drink-, 
water, the playwright is writing a series of 
historical plays, the first of which is to be 
entitled "Cromwell" and in which Arthur 
Bouchier is to play the leading, role. The 
other is ; to ber called "Mary, Queen of 
Seots."' 



MOSS EMPIRES FAYS 15 PER CENT 

Lohdon, Eng., Sept 5. — The Moss Em- 
pires, Ltd., has just declared a dividend 
of 10 per cent, with a bonus of 2s. 6d. 
per share, thus making a 15 per cent divi- 
dend for the half year ending June 30, 
1919. The dividend -for the same period 
last year was only 8 per cent "* 



SHOWS MUST START EARLY 

Adelaide, N. S. W., Aus., Sept 4.— Due 
to a new lighting restriction here, the per- 
formance, of theatricals must start at 7.45 
and- end by 10 o'clock. Matinees are 'given 
by the aid of lamps and candles, as no 
light save one lime lamp is allowed. 



STOP ONE ALEXANDER KB) 

London, Ens., Sept 5. — One of the three 
Alexander Kids has been prohibited from 
working on the English stage because of 
its age. The youngest of the three kids is 
under ten years of age, and, according to 
English law, can not appear. 



DECLARE DIVIDEND OF 20% 
London, Eng., Sept 5. — The directors 
of the Metropolitan Theatre of Varieties 
and the- United Varieties Syndicate, have 
declared a dividend of 20% for the Half 
year ending June 30. The dividends are 
to be tax free. 



OFFICER YOKES OPENS TOUR 

Glasgow, Scotland, Sept 7. — Officer 
Vokes and Don, the inebriated canine, 
opened here yesterday for a tour of the 
Varieties and scored' a big success. Officer 
Vokes and his dog hail from America, 
where they appeared in the Zeigfeld 
Follies. 



GRUNDY AND YOUNG BOOKED - 

London, Eng„ Sept 6.— Grundy and 
Young, an American act which opened here 
some time ago, scored such a hit that it 
has been booked over the Moss Empires and 
Syndicated theatres, till 1921. 



"BIRD OF PARADISE" OPENING 
London, Eng., Sept 5. — Richard Walton 
Tally's "Bird of Paradise" is scheduled to 
open on Sept 11, at the Lyric, under the 
management of Sir Alfred Butt 



BILLY REEVES BOOKED 

London, Eng.. Sept . 5.— Billy Reeves, 

the original "Souse," created such a hit 

here that he has been booked for every 

week this year, and 1920, with the Moss 

.Empires. 



LESLIE GAZE BADLY BURNED 

StdkeT, Aus., Sept 4. — Leslie Gaze was 
badly burned while attempting to extin- 
guish a fire in his home. He was burned 

about the face and hands. 



Would Form Organization to Protect Themselves and Assure 

Mutual Benefit — Could Easily Secure One Hundred 

Members Among Small Independent Managers 



It is again reported that a movement 
has been started to band together the 
managers of stock companies throughout 
the country into a protective association 
for mutual benefit. And the report has 
it that the first step, should it become a 
reality, would be to attempt to lower the 
rate of royalty now being paid for the 
use of plays. The organization, it is said, 
could have at least 100 or more members 
who, if banded together, could benefit 
themselves in many different ways. 

There are up to date, exclusive -stock 
companies in sixty-two cities of the 
United States. - These organizations are 
scattered all over the country, extend 
from coast to coast and from border line 
to border line. The New .England and 



Eastern coast section is the heaviest sup- 
porters of these companies with : the 
Middle West and .West- gaining in 
strength. The larger cities support as 
many as three, and sometimes more com- 
panies. San Francisco has three, Los. An- 
geles three, New York six,. Chicago four, 
Boston three, Oakland, CaL, two. 

The royalties paid by: these organiza- 
tions to play brokers amount to many 
thousands ■ of dollars weekly, ■ and com- 
plaint has often been heard. that they are 
too high. The big .operating- companies 
do not feel this so much. as the small in- 
dependents, whose overhead expense has 
been greatly increased. • j .". 
. It is said that the plan will find favor 
among the independent, permanent com- 
panies. - . . 



GEORGE K. BROWN IN TOWN 

George K. Brown, who manages the 
Brown Players, .which recently closed a 
Summer season at Whalom Park, Fitch- 
burg, Mass., was in New York last week 
securing the -best plays available for the 
reopening of his company on Sept. 15 
at the Lyric theatre, for its regular Win- 
ter run. The members of his cast are 
100 per cent Equity, he says. 

HAWKINS WEBB COMPANIES OPEN. 

Two new Hawkins-Webb companies 
have opened to good business' with stand- 
ard attractions. The one at the Empress, 
Butte, Mont., opened with "Broadway 
Jones," and the one at Flint, Mich., 
opened with "The Fortune Hunter." 

WOODWARD OPENS IN SPOKANE 

Spokane, Wash., Sept 6.— The Wood- 
ward Flayers, at the Woodward Theatre, 
this city, opened their season here- this 
week. The company, under the direction 
of O. D. Woodward, opened with "Here 
Comes the Bride." 



TORONTO STOCK TO CONTINUE 

Toronto, Can.; Sept 6. — The Royal 
Alexandra Players, under the management 
of Ed. Robins, at the Royal Alexandra, will 
continue their season for the remainder of . 
the Winter. . 



OPENS IN HAVERHILL 

HayebhTlx, Mass., Sept. 7. — The Arthur 
Casey stock company, at the Academy of 
Music, this city, has just closed a success- 
ful opening week, with "Happiness" as the 
attraction. ..-..!' ...•'. 



S ALLAN REOPENS SEPT. 15TH ., 

Erie, Pa., Sept. 8. — H. Sallan will re- 
open his season, of stock at the Park Thea- 
tre here September 15. The leading people 
will be Ben Taggart and Corrine CantweU. 



SEAMON REOPENS IN PORTLAND 

Portland, Ore.. . Sept 8. — The Seam on 
Players, at the Baker Theatre, opened their 
regular Winter season here last night with 
"Come Out Of the Kitchen." 



ROSE O'NEILL IS BACK 
Rose O'Neill, who takes care of the stock 
department ' of the American Play Com- 
pany has just returned from a two weeks' 
vacation; . 



" ED WILLIAMS STARTS AGAIN 

Aitoessos, Ind., Sept 8.— Ed. Williams 
reopened' his season here last week at the 
Crystal Theatre. 



JEWISH STOCK REOPENS ■■•- 

Last Friday night the Lyric Theatre, 
Brooklyn, which for several seasons past 
has been the home of ' a Jewish " Stock 
Company, re-opened its' season.'-' 

The . play was a drama in . four acta 
entitled "The Faithful Mother,"' from .the 
pen of S. Cohen and tells - the story of 
how a girl was wronged and the price 
she and her loved ones had to pay for' 
her folly. Miss Lillian, as Nina, the girl 
who for eight years kept-, her -shame a 
secret even from her - husband, did good 
work.. "'•.-••.■.-"'.': • ■:-. ': '.. 

. The story, in brief, is- this, Nina has 
been left with a child by Isadore, who 
has deserted ■. her. , Nina's mother brings 
up. the child as her own, leading. her hus- 
band to believe that- he .is .the father. 
Eight years pass and at a Sunday night 
gathering, Nina, now married to someone 
else, meets Isadore, also, the husband- of 
another. It does not take long for her 
secret to leak out. - Her child takes ill 
and she acknowledged that she is the 
mother^ The child dies. Seeking out 
Isadore in his home, she kills him and 
then' becomes insane. 

The roster of • the company includes 
Mr. Lowenfield, Miss Offerman, Miss 
Lillian, Mr. Lillian, Mr; Maltz, Miss Ring- 
ler, Mr. Rodin, Mr. Klein, Mr. Dorf, Miss 
Hoffman and Miss Ma&ke Klein. The com- 
pany is under the direction of Hyman 
Wilenski, who will- produce all of the 
plays. This is the. fourth year of the 
company's stay in Brooklyn. - The theatre 
has been repainted and redecorated. 

'■■■■ JESSIE BONSTELLE SAILS - 

Jessie Bonstelle, the stock manager and 
star, has sailed Tor. England,, where she 
wiU produce - ^Little Women." Katherine 
Cornell and Marian De Forrest sailed' With . 
her. Miss Cornell is to star in the pro- 
duction in the role Of Jo, and Miss 'De- 
Forrest is to assist in the 'producing of 
the show. 'They sailed, on the- steamer 
Rochambeau last Friday. • : '< 

DESMOND COMPANY OPENS 

Gesicabtown, . Sept 8.— The' opening 
week' of the Mae Desmond Stock Company 
here played to capacity houses at the Or 
ph'eum and . pressaged a successful season . 
"Polly With a'Past" Was used as the open- 
ing vehicle. Those in the company this 
year are Mae Desmond, Frank Fielder, Jay 
J. Mulrey, Jack Hope, William J. Towns- 
end, Helen Des Monde, Ohja Krolow, 
Sumner Nichols, Louise, Sanford, Earl D. 
Dwire, Berhice. Callahan, .Guy.' Hitner and 
Sam C. MAW. This is the company's 
second season here, the previous season 
lasting thirty weeks. 



.K. 



September 10, 1.919 



THE NEW YORK. ..CJLIPRER 



13 




Founded In IOJ bx Fraak Q mm 

Published by the 

CUPPER CORPORATION 

Orland W. ."aughan. . . .President and Secretary 

Frederick **- Muller. ._...{, '...'.... ; .Treasurer 

1604 Broidwsy.'K*"*-"'" * •* 
-Ttlephon* Bryant SM7-C118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 
Paul C Sweinhart, M an ag in g Editor 

NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER, 10, 1910 



bands or musicians might harbor is no less 
..the' actor's grievance. . ...... 

.'The stagehands and musicians have 
shown their great power. They have ele- 
vated themselves to an equal pinnacle' with 
the actor on the theatrical plane. They 
' have gained a new ally from whom they 
have a right to-, expect aid. 

They are the real victors' in the recent 
theatrical war.- 



Ente'red Jane 24. 1879. at.tie Port Office at 
New York. N. Y., aa aecond elaaa matter, on- 
d "the ait of March 3. 1879. 
THE CLIPPER ia leaned every JTODNESDAY. 
. Forma Close on Monday at 5 P. am. 

.SUBSCBJPTiOH; .' V". 
One year, .in advance, $4; six months, J»; 
three months, M. Canada and foreign portaga 
«tra. Single copies will be sent, ., postpaid, on. 

receipt of 10 cent*. •'■'" ' .*.- -■' 

ADVERTISING RATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 

Chlcaao Office-Rnom 841, State Lake Bid* 
^T IU»«v F. Rosa, Mahacib. . 
Su Frandico Office— 830 Market St. 

'"•'-'- ■'"■ ' R. Coh«h, Man acm. ' 



.£>:■ - _______ 

m ' rp ...-■-■.■.. - . 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

McAvoy and May were with Tony Pas- 
tor's Co. 

Cissy Loftus was married to Justin 
Huntley McCarthy. 

De Wolf Hopper opened in "Dr. Syn- 
tax" at the Broadway, New York. 

Delia Fox appeared in "The Little 
Trooper", at the Casino, New York. 

Actors' ' Protective Union No. 1 opened 
offices at 8 Union Square, New York. 
. "Her Eyes Don't Shine Like Diamonds" 
was published by M. Witmark & Sons. 

Hagenbeck's Animals were exhibited at 
the Madison Square -Garden, New York. 

The Gorman Brothers produced "Gil- 
hooley Abroad," with Vevie Nobriga in 
the cast. 

Chas. Drew, Alice Johnson, Snitz Ed- 
wards and Ida. Mulle were with The 
"Brownies" Co. . 



-v. 'Address All Communications to 
TOB : NEW YORK CLIPPER ,. 

~.~'v-. 1« Breohny, Naw Y«s_.^ -' 
fitpjttrrd' Cabl* Address. "AntHOaiTV," 

•< : Tiut CLiwaa CAJtTaa obtaihid wboijiai* a» 
iitaii, at our agents. Corrmge. American News 
Agency 17 Green Street. Charing Cross Road, 
LondoUi W. C,: England; Brentai.0 a News De- 
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(ton &.Ootth,-faS P_t Stress. Sydney. N. S. W.. 
Au,tr»l_: 



Answers to Queries 



E. ' D. S.— Arthur Hopkins wrote the 
book entitled "How Is Your Second Act" 
two years ago. ■". 

A. M. R. — Yes, Sophie Tucker, ia at 
Beiseuweber's again. Write to her in care 
of them. 



'V. U. — CDonnell and Blair played Poli's 
Bridgeport during the first half of the 
week of June 17, 1917. . 



S.' H.— There is a producer by the name 
of John D. Williams: "Up from Nowhere" 
is his latest production. _ 

■EL' I. V.— -It may have been the same 
act.- Acts frequently play the small and 
big time under different names. 

D. D.— Margaret Matzenauer, when she 
was divorced from Eduardo Ferrari-Fon- 
tana, received custody of their child. . 



D. B- E. — Lila Lee, the picture star, is 
the same as the Lila Lee who was "Cud- 
dles." " Georgie Price is his full name. 



WHO WON THE STRIKE? 

Now timt tbe^oke of the theatrical war 
"has ; cleared away and "the St Regis "peace 

tribunal" has changed Broadway once again 

from a battleground to the:'prosperous and 

lively district it used to be,, it is not the 

actor ot. the manager who.i.is entitled to 

say' he" ended the strike.; those who have 

the greatest right to cry. "Victory!" are 

the stagehands and . musicianel "■ 
- Without them, the jactors could never 

bave'stood out. Without the„ intervention, 

of these- two unions, th?- managers would- 

undoubtedly have won. by: assuming a "sit ; 

right' policy. But the opposition, of the 

American Federation of Labor made the 

odds against the. managers too serious and 

too great. It- was, "'on /a smaller scale, a 

parallel to America's interventiott to, the 

world' war: the -stagehands-ami musicians 

held the balance of ';' power "and : turned ^the 

tide of victory;" r>. '■^ i -.\-.. ••} •*;-'i : V-:.'i- ■'.■•.-.. 

• Joseph - N. •■; Weber, v.^'pxeddjmji. 'of ; the 

American Federation otMuSdaaay-told ;the 

actors at their mass meetmg-vou'jSanday,, 

"Without us.you would hbt'bave'Brevaaedj" 

and the applause that' followed, this". state-- 

ment showed s that the. actors .{realized :its ; 

truism; : '-''-. "~ . • '■. : <--\ • . , 

Now,' what of: the, future? :y Arer.tyejto 

take Weber's" word ^at-''the musiciaiis and 

' stagehands came into - tb e fight because ! the 

actors were. Tight" .at -Its face value," o?,.^- „ tl 

would we be justified in seeking^anOtheey^jjr^j. Br o ok 

motivt? 1 '' - •■'. Ki&z c : "yi -'-i'^&jfer ■'? c r^?*"-" ■ 

.„ ."I- ^*-..a ♦».;.<.^ i v« Ma ™r »w.:- r -inyfttock in Cleveland, Ohio. Her name, 



C. H. J.— Both the B. & B. and Ringling 
Brothers' Shows belong to the Ringlings. 
Phineas Taylor Barhum was his full name. 

K. P. — The Friars laid the cornerstone 
of their clubhouse at 110 West 48th Street, 
on Thursday afternoon, October 21, 1915. 

A. F. — Boscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle has' not 
been making any pictures lately. Yes, he 
is one of the most famous comedians on 
the screen. . *. 



i'-"VB. D. C. — Lois Josephine is now teamed 
with Leo Henuing and is presenting 
tically the same act as she did with 



an actor before this' strike did .not eVen- 
recognize" a stagehand pn the street. ; .Weber 
admits that he did not know a single actor 
before the fight began. and how many of 
his. men working in the musician's pit were 
never considered. by the actor other than, as 
a necessary. evil "to ball up" the tempo on 
the song: hit of the show.! ..',,"..';> > ; 

But. now enter the stagehands and musi- 
cians in a new light. They personify the 
hero who ' enters in the third act and saves 
the chee-ild _ . o. 

But,- more than gaining the respect of the 
actor,'. they have placed; him in a. lifelong 
debt He 'is now. more, than' friend; he is 
Rn ally. Just as the actor's battle was 
labor's fight, so now.it should: seem the 
future 1 business grievances that the stage- 



1 prior to .her legally changing it, was Theo- 
dosia Goodwin. j >:' 



STRIKING HUMOR 



3P- 



and After It W« SeltleJ 



THE END HAS COME 

The actor 
Can now get his watch 
Out of hock 

And settle with the landlady 
And eat 3' squares per day again. 

Tho manager - ' - ' ' «' 3 '• 

Can be interviewed once mora ' 
On such subjects as: ' -i- S 

"Tendencies of the Modern Drama,** 
Or "How I Pick My Stare," . 5f 
And he need no longer worry 
About the H. C. L, 

The press agent 
Can dispense with the ice-box 
And dust off the typewriter 
And again feed the editors 
With hokum and pipe-stuff 
That they have grown to love 
Because of its constancy. 
How the stuff has been missed 
For the past month! 

The musicians 
Can once again sound "A" 
And sleep regularly 
In the musician's pit 
Between "the song numbers 
In the shows in which they play. 
And the stage hands 
Need no longer call the actor 
^Brother" 

But may now call him 
The old, familiar names 
Whenever he gets in the way 
Of (he sce'neshifter. 

The public 

Lord bless 'em! — 

Can once again cut out the pictures 

Of stage favorites 

From' the magazines - ' - 

And enjoy the naughtiness. 

Of a bedroom farce • -v n 

Or the tunelessness '. ,• * ' ■ 

Of a. musical comedy 

That hag no plot 

But' is otherwise very good, *,>:' 

Ah, the good old days returneth! 

And we need no longer worry •'• 

About writing Striking Humor, 

Though we admit* ; 

We will miss the speeches , 

Of Louis Mann. ■■■ 



Some of the newspapers have been set- 
tling the strike every morning. 



When the stage-hands refused to allow 

the Gailo Opera Company to appear, it 
kept the singers from cashing' their notes. 

..-■' ' -->. i 1 ■■■■■■a 

We hear that Arthur Hopkins Is consid- 
ering writing a history of the theatre. If 
so-' he ' will probably allude to the present 
as "The Dark Age." 



:-j '. 



As we ait ait those Fidelity meetings 
.and, at times, our thoughts run around 
rather distractedly, we often wonder at 
what atore one can buy those monoplane 
collars. . 



Perhaps all these journeys to Washing- 
ton have been to persuade the powers- that- 
. be to insert a .clause in the League of 
Nations that will make further theatrical 
'wars impossible. 



C. W.— Gus Edwards bas been producing 
revues and- musical acts for several sea- 
sons past.. Yes, Olga Cook worked for 

him two 'years ago. 

E. D; B— Mae -Murray was' a Ziegfeld 
girl once. Yes, she is the original Brink- 
ley girl. You are right; ehe has been - 
s tarred in pictures.'/ !-.'.'•; :> .. . ■: ,., 

~EL T.— Ton. lose tie bet. The Bigo 
who appeared at the Regent a few weeks 
ago is. the same Bigo who was married to 
the Princess de Chi may . 



■ Publicity Purveyor Head, who recently 
assumed command of Belasco'a press de- 
partment, says that be can't understand 
why no one has struck him for "ducats", 
since he has been on the job. We wonder t 



. George White was lamenting over the 
fact the other 'day that he hasn't the same 
command, of language as Louis Mann. 

"Command, nothing!" put in Willie Col- 
lier, probably thinking of Mann's recent, 
allusion to an "anonymous check.**. "Mann 
hasn't command of the ' language ; ; he -has 
lost' control." . .- •'•"'. •' 



This .strike's a big drama, but there are 
no intermissions. .. 



In theatrical parlance, the actors' strike 
had a long run. . 



We never- beard less from Lee and Jake 
nor more from Louis Mann. 



They cried "Peace! Peace'!*? but there 
was no piece playing on all of Broadway. 

This' affair is different than a baseball 
game, for, in this, one strike means out. 



The ' opening or closing of "The Chal- 
lenge" is getting to he an every- day affair. 

Striking humor is hard to find this week, 
for Louis Mann has been unusually quiet 



. Tommy Gray attends all the meetings of 
the playwrights for some reason or other. 



Oh, those, were the good old days — those 
days when.- there were shows on Broad- 
way... * 



Ed. Wynn remarked last week that the 
managers can't win, because they have no 
show. 



It's mighty lucky these days for the dra- 
matic critics that they are not .'"paid on 
space." . . . -~{ 



There's many an actor who' has played 
the role of striker' longer than any other 

role he ever had. 



On Broadway, you would think it still 
summertime, so many actors are walking 
around out of work. 



. Probably the position of ° some of the 
Equity members is: I love my 
Mann, but I love Barrymore. 



Morris Gest was trying to get in "right" 
with the members of the "Fourth Estate", 
who hang around the managerial publicity 
office for news, cigars, 'n other things. 

"I used,, to be a newspaperman,** re- 
marked Gest, springing the old gag. 

"Ia that'rightl" said one of the boys; 
,? to be polite. 

"Yes, I used to sell newspapers in Bos- , 

ton.'* ' 

To the tune of "T was Only an Irish- 
man's Dream": " 

Sure, the lights were all shining on Broad- 
way; 
Every playhouse was packing 'em in. ■ 
All were seated at eight and did patiently 
wait 
For the time that the play wouldJfBegin. 
Stage-hands sang aa they set lip the 
scenery ; .- 

Stars just begged to go on, it did seem; 
The musicians all pleaded iv "-,-- r -- 
To play longer than needed— . 
But 'twas only a manager's dream. 

.. (News Item.— ,Fat Lady and Wild Man 

from Borneo go on strike at Maine County 

Fair.) 

The fat lady sat on her reinforced chair 

And said to the wild man with long, bushy 

hair, ., ■ * • , 

"Here we work night and day 
• . For such low, measly pay, 
That it's, high time we struck, for this 

side show's unfair!" - -'. 

So she packed up her photos, abandoned 

her chair, 
While her wild partner shaved and parted 
his hair. _ ■:•■"' ' ' 

They went on strike ' '- , ..^ '.;:, 
And they started to hike . 
Away from the tent at the Maine County 
FaSrv/' --..'- J.., .".''.-.. 

' The fat- lady found it cost money, to eat. 
And with, funds getting low, she grew thin, 
more petite, - . 

And the noisy, wild man 
laving on a new plan, 
Looked quite like the rest of us walking 
the street. 

I 
So when the strike trouble was settled, at 

last 
The lady once fat had 

.. Afl*TO-Js^^iairc*^OT< ' 
JliVat tEe wild man no- more— 
fellojv- — Thus, when the show started again, they 
were not in the cast. - " 



.1 

1 



m 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 






IFIED 

By the writers of "Lonesome 15 and "Bubbles" 



Songs that 
please the 
public are 
sure hits. 

This is 
one of 

them l 



it was born a Hit J 



e*» 




HERE'S 

YOUR 

COPY 





ets 



the kind of 

applause 

that thrills 

you through 



Your Copy and 
Orchestrations Are Ready 



CHICAGO 

>and Opera -House: Buildinfl 

BOSTON 

181 TrcmontStrect 

PHILADELPHIA 

Globe Theatre Building 

NEW ORLEANS 

115 University. Place 

TORONTO. 193 Yongr St 



LEO. FEIST, Inc 

711 Seventh Avenue, New York 




CLEVELAND.' Elia<.ton<- Bide. 
BUFFALO, 485 Main St. 
PITTSBURGH. 312 Camerphone Bids 



DETROIT. 213 Woodward A\e. 

-KANSAS CI IV. Cavetv Theatre^ Bld^r 
' LOS ANGELES. S36 San FemaJndo'Bidjr. 



ST. LOUIS 

wiumet': Building 

SA.Ni FR.ANC1SCO : 

m.aces Theatre Building 
.MINNEAPOLIS 

^yric TKe>tre u Building, 



September 10, 1919 



THE HEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




CENSORS STILL 
CfeEAWNG UP 



SHOWS 



MANY MORE CHANGES ORDERED 



The censors of The American Burlesque 
: Circuit are still at work whipping . the 
shows . on their wheel into shape. They 
seem to be making a determined effort to 
place all companies in top notch shape. 
Last week they ordered sweeping changes 
in several shows. This week. the bine pen- 
ciling continued, with the following results : 
"Bound the Town."— Owned by Stouse 
and Frankiyn. Changes require two new 
principals in cast. Show excellent other- 



"Girla, Girls, Girls."r-Changes require 
all principals except prima' donna and 
sonbrette, to be changed at once. 

"Cracker Jacks."— Owned by Ed Rush. 
— Changes require two changes in prin- 
cipals, two new sets of scenery and- four 
new changes of wardrobe. i , 

"Sport Girls." — Owned by Sam Howe. 
Changes require two principals to be re- 
placed, two new sets of scenery and several 
borders to be replaced. Also . two new 
seti of. costumes to be provided. 

The changes ordered last week have been 
made and the censors subsequently have 
pot their O. K. on the shows. Among 
those ordered- changed were, "The Temp- 

j ters," "Social Follies," and "Jazz Babies." 

. Several managers have asked the censors 
•for clemency, stating that they have, em- 

■ Sployed a good many principals who have 
never worked in burlesque before and say 

'the' committee should give them time to be- 
come broken- in. 

The following shows have been passed 
as being first class: "Follies of Pleasure," 
owned by Rube Bernstein: "Monte Carlo 
Girls," owned by Tom Sullivan ; "Beauty 
Review," owned by Sam Levey; "Hello 
Frenchy," owned by Thomas Beatty: "Pat 
■White's Own Show," "Sweet Sweetie 
; Girls," owned by Chas. M. Baker, and "Ed. 

* Hayes and his Own Show," -owned by 
Dave Kraus. j '-., " 



SUES BURLESQUE CLUB 

E\ The Burlesque-Club ov bein^ auod fox 

BM6 by Joseph Dick, who, last June, whan,, 

aroe "club printid a program far its anr. 

nual outing, solicited advertising for the 

program. 

In his complaint, filed in the Third Dis- 
trict Municipal Court, Dick alleges that 
the amount claimed is a balance due him 
for commissions on advertising matter he 
sold for the program. He claims that he 
sold $475 worth, and that he was to re- 
ceive twenty per cent of that .amount; 
that . the total commissions due him 
amounted to $95, but that he received 
only $30 on account. He is, therefore, 
seeking to recover the alleged balance. 

CHANGE WILLIAMS SHOW CAST 

Wobcestkb, Mass., Sept. 8. — Several 
changes will be made in the "Girls From 
Joy land" here this week. Roy Burke will 
replace Bert Keller, Jean Shuller will re- 
place Al. Watson and George Wright re- 
places George Brennon. A new sonbrette is 
also expected here from New York during 
the week. Sim Williams has also taken 
over the management of the company and 
win remain with the show for the balance 
of the season. 



"BLUTCH" COOPER IS BETTER 
Patchooue, L. I., Sept 8. — James E. 
(Blotch) Cooper, burlesque magnate, ar- 
rived here today. He will spend several 
weeks recuperating from a recent illness. 

Cooper wast* confined to bis home in Yon- 
kerg for •fltonrj. weeks with pneumonia, but 
since pa&ng the crisis he' has been steadily 
improving' in^ health. The doctors- claim 
it was only his great strength and resistive 
powers that bulled him. through. ' He lost 
about forty 



I. 



pounds during his illness. 




HAYES' SHOW WONT LAY OFF 

The Edmond Hayes Show, instead of lay- 
ing off next week, before going into Tren- 
ton, has made arrangements to play Plain- 
field on Monday, Perth Amboy Tuesday and 
Bristol on Thursday. It is expected that 
they- will book in New Brunswick Wednes- 
day in the next few days and then tatke up 
their regular time on Friday, at Trenton. 



BUSINESS IS GOOD 

Business in the burlesque houses is re- 
ported as very good throughout the country 
this season. Word comes into New York 
every day of the record breaking business 
shows' are doing in many towns. Houses 
which a few seasons ago. did from $2,500 
to $3,500 on the week are doing this sea- 
son, from $6,000 to over $8,000. 



NEWARK LOCAL TO HAVE BENEFIT 

Newark, N. J., Sept. 6. — A benefit will 
be given at the Broad Theatre, this city, on 
Sunday, Sept. 14th, for the Sick and Death 
Fund of the Newark Theatre Stage Em- 
ployees local 21. ' Ten acts will appear. 
Morris Schlinger has donated the house. 
Tom Miner will be the stage director and 
Jim Marco the producer. 



KAHN.CJVES BONUS 
One of the -first "things Ben Kahn did 
on his return from Maine on Tuesday of 
last week was to give the chorus girls who 
remained, loyal to his house during the 
Summer'' a bonus of $20 each. . It was 
handed out last Saturday in addition to 
their salary.. He also advanced all. the 
girls to $20 per week." 

MAE KEARNS MARRIES 

Mae Reams, of the National Winter 
Garden, was married on August 26th in 
New} York to Fred Isaacs, of. the- New 
Hayries Hotel, - Springfield. Miss Kearas 
lef t :> f or; .' Springfield '. after the ! wedding, 
whefce shie will make her home. 

* ■• — — ~ rT rmr — ™~ 

CASTS ARE STRENGTHENED 

Norma. Bell, Roy Sean and Billy Gib- 
son .were£booked into Kalm's Union Square 
lasti-.weelt AlscMitty Devere with "Jan 
" -"■Tjean SlnHer with "Girls. From . 
'• George *Clark and Ect Crawford 
"Gfjrla, Girls, Girla."- All were booked 
and Richards. . 




ALSPUTJ3VER 
Trffe 




MONDAY 



SOME SHOWS ALREADY WORKING 



With the opening of the National Bur- 
lesque Circuit season . taking place next 
Monday, General Manager Charles Bar- 
ton, when seen early this week, would only 
give out the. openings of a few shows on 
his circuit. 

Tom Coyne's Show, which played the 
Garden, Buffalo, last week, moved into the 
Pershing Theatre at Bast Liberty, Pitts- 
burgh, on Monday of this week. 

Mark Lea's "Cheer Up Girla" will play 
three one nlghters into Baltimore, where 
it will open next Monday at the Folly. 

Jimmy James "Girls From Jasaland" 
opened at Amsterdam Monday and will 
play one nlghters into Buffalo, where it 
will open Monday. 

Dick Zizzler's "Girls From the Gaieties" 
will open at the Colombia, Rochester, on 
Saturday and will play there all the fol- 
lowing week. | 

Margie Pennetti's "High Life Girla" 
will open at the Gayety, Philadelphia, 
next Monday. , 

Lew Livingston's "Vampire Girls" is in 
rehearsal. ■ ' ■ ." 



WORKING OLD GAME AGAIN 

The old game pot' Over on several box 
offices around -the circuit a few years ago, 
wag tried again at the Majestic Jersey 
City, last week when the "Step Lively 
Girls" were playing there. 

A man stepped up to the box office 
about six o'clock one evening with a pack- 
age addressed to the manager of the show, 
and - with $52.50 charges to be collected. 
The young man in the box office paid the 
money. When the package was opened 
by Manager Shapiro, it contained a dozen 
lamp shades from a five and ten cent, store. 



JOIN UNION SQUARE COMPANY 

Bert Bernard, last season with Stone 
and Pillard, and Stella Rose, with Ben 
. Walsh last season, opened at Rahn'a Union- 
Square, Monday. 

SIGN FOR "JAZZ BABIES" 

Mittie Devere and Benton and Clark 
have been engaded by Peck and Jennings 
for their "Jazz Babbies" Company on the 
! American Circuit, 



SOUBRETTE FN HOSPITAL 
Louisville, Ky., Sept 6. — Dot Barnetto, 
sonbrette of the "Cabaret Girls," baa been 
confined to her hotel with an attack of 
the grippe. It is expected she will be able 
to rejoin her show and open in Columbus 
Sunday. In the cast of the "Cabaret 
Girsl" this season, are Manny King, Fred 
Hackett, Ben Holmes, Earl Sheeban, Dot 
Barnette, Leona Fox and Bertha Starts- 



YORKV1LLE OPENS IN OCTOBER 

It is now reported that Hurtig and Sea- 
man win open, the YorkviUe about Oct. 
11.* Frank Parry, formerly manager of the 
Colombia, Chicago, will manage the house. 



JOINS THE BOSTONIANS 

Clare Clay an ingenue, has been booked 
with the Bostonians. She will open in 
Albany Saturday. Ike Weber booked her. 



GOES INTO "GIRLS DE LOOKS" 

Hilda Le Roy will replace Elsie Bostel 
as prima donna of the "Girla de Looks" 
next week in Cleveland. 



BAKER CHANGES CAST 

The following changes have been made 
in Charles Baker's "Tempters": Margie 
Hilton, Frank Hanscom and Ethel John- 
son have closed. The new members are 
James Mclnerney, Dorothy Lawrence and 
Vslma Addison. 



SIGN WITH DEADY SHOW 

George Clark, Ed. Crawford and Ernest 
Fisher,'- have been signed for Deady's 

"Girls, Girls, GMs^J^mpany.. , 

REVUE HAS NEW INGENUE 

Dotty Ray has replaced Phylis Eltis aa 
ingenue with Abe Reynolds' Revue, booked 
by Roehm and Richards. • 



PLANT REPLACES SUITS 

Vic Plant will replace George Suits with 
Campbell and Drew's "Liberty Girla" at 
Boston this week. - - 



.* FLO DAYS GETS DIVORCE 
Flo Davis, sonbrette of "Blntch". 
Cooper's "Sight Seers" was granted a 
divorce from George E. Leavett, a lieuten- 
ant in the army stationed in Columbus, 0., 
in Chicago recently. 




. Cooper's "Best Show In Town" la 
this week's attraction at the Columbia, featur- 
ing Frank Hunter In a book entitled "Here, 
There and Everywhere," for which Bitty K. 
Wells Is responsible. 

Hunter and Manny Kohler are handling- 
the comedy. Hunter does a "wop" In tin 
Orst part and makes his entrance as an Ital- 
ian general. He Is banting for a rich wire. 
After his first entrance ha changes to a miss- 
flt dress salt. In this character, be is ex- 
tremely amusing. 

He does black face In the second act, get- 
ting as much as he could out of the part. 

Kohler la doing a Dutch comedy role of a 
refined type. He Is sood In the part, his 
dialect pleases and he dresses neatly. 

Ralph Bockawsy is doing the "straight" 
He. la on* of those fellows who pats all his 
energy Into hla work. He reads lines nicely 
and makes a good appearance. 

Chas Wesson It a juvenile "straight" He 
sings and dances nicely, dresses well and 
handles himself finely. 

Lynn Cantor, a one looking prima donna, 
was In excellent voice Monday ad rendered 
her umbers with her usual success. . Her 
wardrobe Is beautiful. The gown she wears 
In her opening Is really ■ gorgeous. 8h« did 
nicely In the scenes and. Is very clever. 

The McClond Bisters are with 'this show. 
They are two attractive blondes and look 
enough like one another to be twins. This Is 
the first time we have seen liable at the Co- 
lumbia since she was with the "Bon Tons" 
several years ago. She was then doing a 
minor part, and she has Improved wonder- 
fully, both In her work and appearance. She 
reads lines well, puts a number over great 
and dances as she did when we last saw her. 
Her acrobatic dancing,- high kicking and 
splits, took the house. '• 

Flossie McCloud's eccentric style of work- 
ing was liked try the audience. She breesed 
right into favor through her dashing ways and 
charming personality. Her costumes were In 
good taste. These two girls are a success, 
and they should go well all over the circuit. 
Margie Winters, with a delightful person- 
ality and easy way of working, makes 'a 
dandy Ingenue. She has a strong voice that 
la just suited for ebon or ]axs numbers, and 
bad no trouble in getting encores tor an the 
number she offered. Her wardrobe Is can!- 
vatlng. 

Virginia Ware, a good straight" woman 
for Hunter, did very well In all the 
in which she appeared. She offered 
very pretty dresses, likewise. 

The "bench" bit offered by Hunter and 
Flossie McClond. was well worked up. Bock- 
awsy had left a hotwater bag on the bench 
and Hunter, while making love to Was Me- 
Cloud, sat on It His actions were fuany 
and kept the audience laughing during the 
entire scene. • ■ . 

The "love" bit, with Hunter proposing to 
different women until he found one with 
money, was pnt over well and was liked. Dur- 
ing the scene. Wesson, Kohler, Bockaway ana 

the Misses Cantor, Ware, Winters and Xante 
McClond appeared. It was different than 
. the usual proposing uts and went big. 

The "apedalator" Wt, wtr U Wesson aa the 
".pec" selling- a ticket to Hunter, who wanted 
to see- a burlesque show, was anoth er bit 
that was new and worked up welt Kohler 
and Bockaway also appeared In the bit ' 

The "punch" bit was another good comedy 
scene. Miss Cantor, who waa to hold a recep- 
tion, called different members of the house- 
hold to make the punch. Each bad an excuse, 
but came back one at a time with a bottle of 
liquor of different kinds. Later, several par- 
took of the punch and became Intoxicated. 
and Miss Ware's Imitation of one In that con- 
dition was excellently done. The scene fin- 
ished with a fast acrobatic dance offered by 
Hunter, and Stable McClond, that went W». 

Flossie MeClond. In a beautiful partus 
gown, offered a singing specialty In one. Her 
two* numbers were liked and she pot them 
Over well. 

The chorus girl number of musical lustra - 
•menu wss nicely carried out HtmteT, as- 
sisted by Bockawsy, worked op sons food 

laughs here. • 

The Ttoy Bbop" scene was about the asm* 
aa last seas o n . Hunter and Kohler. as babies, 
getting; a number of laughs. Flossie Mc- 
Clond did a good eccentric dance at the finale 
, of the first act, which gate the torn a good 

Vesaon and Miss Cantor- sooted In their 

which, opened with both zflajtng 

Wesson then went Into, a dandy 

shoe dance, Introducing a number lot 

dlrBcaH steps. 



X6 



Ififfe NT^M^OR^ct:tPT^ii. 



•0; r ' ;-';^tesmber 10, 1919 




September 10, 1919 



T^E : N;ETW Y.O R K /.' CHIPPER 



>i7 





GEO. FRIEDMAN OUT OF 
McCARTHY-FLSHER CO. 

JC*neral -Manager and Put Owner of 
Company Resigns — Joe Mrtttrntnal, 

Former Sales Manager, In 

George. Friedman, for the past- two and 
a half years the general manager, of the 
McCarthy: & Fisher publishing house, re- 
signed his position last week. In addi- 
tion to being the manager of the concern 
Mr. .Friedman wag also a stock holder 
in the corporation and in resigning sold 
out his interests in the company, receiv- 
ing therefor a cash settlement amounting, 
. it is said, to $15,000. 

The McCarthy & Fisher Co., although 
one of the young firms in the music pub- 
lishing business has been particularly sue- . 
eesaful, has published a number of big' 
selling song hits land prospered greatly 
financially. Joe McCarthy, the lyric 
writer was one of the original founders, 
of the firm and when .he withdrew, sev- 
eral months ago received $70,000 for his 
interest. Fred Fisher, the composer, who 
with McCarthy, started the business, will 
continue to conduct the house and Joe 
Mlttcnthal, former' sales manager,. Das 
succeeded George Friedman as general 
manager. Mitt en thai is well known in 
the music field,' having been connected 
with the business for many years and 
having been associated with a number of 
tile big houses. 

. Mittentbal is now in Chicago and is ex- 
pected back in New York some time next 
week. 



SOCIETY AFTER NEW MEMBERS 

■• The American Society of Composers, 
Authors and Publishers has commenced 
an active campaign for new members. 
At a meeting of the board 'of directors 
held last week a number of old members 
who are in arrears 'for dues were dropped 
from the membership list and a com- 
mittee to secure new members was ap- 
pointed. 

The society is making great financial 
strides at present and has to its credit in 
various banks over $100,000. At some 
future date this sum is to be divided 
among the members who are predicting 
that within a few years the amount 
that publishers and writers will receive 
from the society will surpass the big 
royalties paid by the phonograph com- 
panies. 



THIS ONE FROM ANDY 

Andrew B. Sterling usually pens bia 
thoughts in' verse form but occasionally 
drops into prose and writes an epigram 
worthy of reproduction. A Cufpeb man 
passed him on the street the other day 
and quiet Andy without a word handed 
him tiie following: "Some people get a 
lot of advertising out of the money they 
give away, but give me the guy that'll 
split his last ten with you and keeps it 
under his bat," 



MUSIC PUBLISHERS WARNED 

The Executive Board ■- of the Music 
Publishers' Protective Association has . 
sent out. a warning to publishers regard- 
ing the -supplying of special songs, lyrics v 
or material of -amy kind to performers,. or 
the issuing' of a restricted number except 
to legitimate productions. 

This practice is, according to the con- 
stitution of: the .Association, a method of 
unfair competition, and any member 
found guilty of such violation can be 
fined to the extent of $5,000, and the fine 
can be collected by process of law. ' _ 

In- 'the future, members are not re* 
- quired to make complaints of a violation 
of the Association's constitution, as the 
executive board is authorized to make 
such complaints of its own "initiative, if 
written information of violations are fur- 
nished it." ■ '■;. 
. - . Up to the present no .complaints have 
. been filed, but there has been much talk 
among publishers ■ that certain members 
of the association have been supplying 
singing actors with special material with 
the object of securing the singer's serv- 
ices in the introduction of songs on the 
vaudeville -stage, 

SISSLE AND BLAKE STOP SHOWS 

One of the strongest acta on the vaude- 
ville stage -just now is that presented by 
Lieut. Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake, 
known as the Dixie Duo, and late Of the 
369th U. S. Infantry Band, the famous 
"Hell Fighters" organized by the late Jim 
Europe. Sissle and Blake are stopping 
.shows wherever they appear. At the 
Boyal Theatre last week they not only 
scored one of the big hits of the bill; but 
held the show up at every performance. 
Some of their song numbers are, "Gee, 
Fm Glad Fm From Dixie," "Good Night 
My Angeline," "The Doggone Baltimore 
Blues," "Aint Tou Coming Back Mary 
Ann To Maryland," and "Tin Just Simply 
Full Of Jazz," all of which are published 
by M. Wit mark &. Sons. 



MUSIC MEN START A 

REGISTRY BUREAU 



MEYER COHAN BRANCHING OUT 

.Meyer Cohen is planning to enlarge his 
music publishing business by the estab- 
lishment of branch ofliees in a number of 
the large cities throughout the country. 
The Cohen catalogue is strong with good 
songs at present, and with the addition 
of considerable capital Mr. Cohen is mak- 
ing preparations for a big fall season. 

GEO. FRIEDMAN MAY PUBLISH 

Geo. Friedman, who resigned from the 
McCarthy & Fisher Co. last week may 
enter -the music publishing business on 
his own account within the next few 
weeks. 



HERMAN KLEIN IS NOW A BANKER 
Herman Klein, for the past year stenog- 
rapher for Phil. Kormheiser, has quit the 
music business and. is now connected with 
a big downtown' banking concern. 



GILBERT SINGS "GRANNY" 

One of the best things in the L. Wolfe 
Gilbert vaudeville act la the song 
"Granny," which the writer sings at 
every performance. It is one of his re- 
cent numbers, and judging from its re- 
ception win be one of his most popular 
compositions. 

EDDIE ROSS WITH STERN . 
Eddie Rosa, who for several. yean paat 
has been connected with the professional 
department of M. Witmark & Sons is 
now with Jos. W. Stern. Sc Co. 



HARROLD DELLON HAS NEW JOB 

Harrold Dellon, for the past year with 
the T. B. Harms & Francis, Day A. Hunt- 
er Co., is now with the professional de- 
. partment of the Gilbert & Friedland Co. 

ED. ROSE WITH BERLIN 

Ed. Rose, -the lyric writer, who for the 
past year has been connected with .the 
McCarthy & Fisher Co., is now with 
Irving Berlin. 

SCHENC K IS NO W ASST. MGR. 
Herman Schenck, a brother of Joe. 
Schenck of Van & Schenck, is now the as- 
sistant professional manager of the Harry 
Von Tilzer Co. 



JOHNSON BACK FROM VACATION 

Howard Johnson, the lyric writer, is 
back. at work after a three months' vaca- 
tion spent at Nantasket Beach. 



. RICHMOND HAS NEW JOB 

Jack Richmond, of the Leo Feist pro- . 
fessional department, has succeeded Kath- 
ryn Joyce. In the band and orchestra de- 
partment. • 

\. - . - -" '& ~' J „ f: -' - ' ' 



Music.: 

Establishes a 



for to* 



Protection of Sons; Tide* 
The Music Publishers' Protective Asso- 
ciation has, after much discussion, estab- 
lished . a bureau of registration for the ' 
protection of song and instrumental titles 
and this week has put the department 
into actual operation. '•-;.' 
■. The idea of tiie bureau is not only to 
protect a title in case of Infringement, 
but also to avoid the many innocent 
duplications which are constantly occur- 
ring and prevent the many misunder- 
standings and law suite' Which arise 
therefrom. The bureau will be handled 
under the direction of the Executive 
Board by E. C. Mills, assistant secretary, 
who will give his personal attention to 
the registration of manuscripts. 

Forms have been supplied the members 
of the Association with complete instruc- 
tions as to how to register titles and as 
soon as a song or instrumental composi- 
tion has been filed; provided it does not 
conflict with one already listed in the 
bureau, a certificate of registration will 
be issued, and this certificate will vest' 
in the person or firm to which it is is- 
sued, the exclusive publication right as 
against all other members of the organ- 
ization. 

The association believes that the reg- 
istry bureau will become one of the most 
valuable departments of the organization 
and state that this department alone 
will furnish protection worth far more 
than the annual dues of the society. 

The main criticism of the bureau is due 
to the fact that not all of the country's 
publishers are members of the Music 
Publishers' Protective Association and 
therefore, imitations or duplications 
would be just as frequent as in the past 
as only members of the organization are 
entitled, to the bureau's protection. ' - 

The association, however, is msVjng a 
strong campaign for new members and 
state that with the added value of the 
registry . bureau, the matter of enrolling 
every music house of standing in the en- 
tire country will be but a matter of a 
few months. 



REMICK DISCONTINUES SUIT 

The suit at law brought by Jerome H. 
Remick - & Co. against Fred Bowers for 
song title infringement has been discon- 
tinued. Bowers published a song called 
"Sahara" and the Remick company 
claimed that it was an infringement of 
its number of the same name featured 
in the Winter Garden production. 

Bowers agreed to change the name of 
his number and the suit was withdrawn. 



NEW IRISH SONG SCORES 

Gerald Griffin, the Irish - singer, ap- 
peared at the Liberty Theatre, Camp 
Merritt, a few days ago and scored one 
of the big hits of his career with the 
new Bong "Let's Help the Irish Now," a 
song which appeals for aid for Ireland 
in her present endeavors. 



KELLETTE PLACES NEW SONGS 

John William Kellette, who is directing 
the Paramount-Briggs motion picture 
comedies, has placed a new number with 
Jos. W. Stern A Co. entitled "Bubbling 
Over (Life Is Babbling Over All the 
Time)." 



STERN RELEASES NEW SONGS 

Jos. W. Stern A Co. has released two 

' new songs which are going well with a 

number of big time singers.' They are 

"I Found the. Sweetest Rose That Grows 

Tn Dixieland," and "Sweetie Rose." 



WHY HARRIS DIDN'T DIRECT 

One of the advertised features of tin 
Barney Eagin benefit held recently at the 
.Manhattan Opera House was Chas. E. 
Harris, who' was billed to direct the or- 
chestra in the rendition of a medleyi*r- 
rangement of his famous song bits. 

The management of the affair first 're- 
quested Mr. Harris to sing from the stage 
but' the composer-publisher refused, and 
finally, after much urging, agreed to toad 
the orchestra if that was agreeable. The 
.management - announced that ' this was 
more than agreeable and promised to 
make the necessary arrangements. • 

' A rehearsal was held during the after* 
noon prior to the performance, and Mr. 
Harris, in the pit, took the big orchestra 
through the -melodies of his old time suc- 
cesses, commencing with "After The Ball" 
and running through his big catalogue . 
up to his present hits. 

In the evening Mr. Harris arrived at the 
theatre, and going to the orchestra room 
prepared to go on. Just before he en- 
tered the pit a young man accosted -him 
and asked to see his union card. -What 
card?" demanded the surprised Harris. 
"Why, your Musician's Union card, of 
course," replied the young man, "no one 
can play or lead an .orchestra without be- 
ing a member of the union." "Not even 
at a benefit?" enquired the surprised Har- 
ris. "Not' even at a benefit," replied the 
young man. "That lets me out," said the 
composer, who then went out in front and- 
watched the show. 

A special permit far the appearance 
could nave been arranged by the manage- 
ment if it had made a request at the 
unino's headquarters. * 



McKINLEY HAS MANY SINGERS 
John Knox, Arthur Hall, Paul Eiwood, 
Bob Schafer, Frank McCormack, Ernest 
Lambert, Dave Ringle and Raymond 
Abrarns, all with the McKinley Music Co. 
form a singing unit that is hard to beat 
and each night they are appearing at.' the 
leading photo-play theatres in and around 
New York featuring "Hawaiian Moon- 
light,** and "The White Heather," two of 
the recent song releases from the Mc- 
Kinley Co. 

MILLS HAS GREAT COMEDY SONG 
One of the best comedy numbers of the 
season is Jack Mills' new song. "I Don't 
Want A Doctor," and although but a few 
weeks old is being featured by scores of 
the best vaudeville singers. It seems a 
sure fire hit, aa every style of an act has 
used it, and all have found it a great ap- 
plause winner. 

FORBIDS WAGNERIAN OPERA 

Pajus, Sept. 6.— The Prefect of Police 
has put a ban on the performances of 
German opera in this city, in order to pre- 
vent' hostile outbreaks. 

A performance of Wagnerian operas 
scheduled for last week at the Tulleries 
Gardens was called off because of the 
Prefect's action. 



FA GIN AT WITMARK BDWY. OFFICE 

Billy- Fagin, who has been representing 
M. Witmark A Sons at Atlantic City, has 
been brought to New York, and in future 
will be at the ] Broadway office of the 
firm. 



PARAMOUNT TRIO WITH McKTMLEY 

The Paramount Trie, comprising Mais- 
ner, Walter Bolan and Norman De Weir 
are new additions to the professional de- 
partment of the McKinley Music, Co. 

FITZPATRICK WITH WITMARK 

Toby Fitrpatrick, formerly with the AL 
Piantadosi Co. has joined the professional 
staff of M. Witmark A Sons. 



BENNETT WITH JACK MILLS 

George Bennett, formerly with Jos. W. 
Stern A Co., is now with Jack MBtt 



::'■' ■ ,'-. ■■ :■ .-.. ''■;■:. •• "' ; 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 



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;,/?^ : '^^^^/'. i A^i^ r ':^ BY-HARRY PEASE 
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"20 ?M*E ■ N BW* YOtt K G LI PP E R September 10, 1919 



\A/ A IM 







' ' ' .... i ..... 

Experienced men to represent The Meyer Cohen Music 
Company in the following cities of the United States 
and Canada; 

- . ■ . ^ •■.- . ^ . .......... '.■.■. . . ■■'.-..■• ... • .■■.'.-■' 

MEYER COHEN ,. 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES BALTIMORE BOSTON DETROIT ■"•>.. 

ATLANTA OMAHA . SEATTLE . PORTLAND, ME. CLEVELAND 

TORONTO, CAN. PHTSBURG PHD1ADELPHIA WILKESBARRE CHICAGO 

MINNEAPOLIS MILWAUKEE NEW: ORLEANS BUFFALO ST. LOUIS 

KANSAS CITY V : ' . PORTLAND, ORE. 

Must be good singer or pianist and all around good live wire. We will back you up with the greatest bunch of ballad hit* 
ever published by one firm. Every song a hit. If other firms had them they would be in the high price, hat. Ours are popular. 

THAT'S WHAT GOD MADE MOTHERS FOR 

has not scratched ground in this country yet, and the only ballad hit in England — by Leo Wood. '- 

SOMEBODY STOLE MY GAL 

By Leo Wood— has been smoldering for nearly a year; now it's a hit, and any singer has a cinch with it. It's a riot. 

MOTHER'S ROSARY OF LOVE 

By Leo Wood and Eddie Dorr. A sure-fire hit and the most appealing song written in years. Beautiful bell effects in 

orchestration. Featured by Belle Fromme. 

IF I ONLY HAD YOU JMSkSg 

By Harry Pease and Eddie Nelson. Harry Pease stops every show with it. The best minstrel ballad and real love ballad 

now on the market. 

NOBODY KNOWS HOW I MISS YOU, DEAR OLD PALS 

By Lew Porter and Eddie Dorr. A beautiful sentimental ballad, suitable for any act in concert or vaudeville. Don't fail 

to send for it. 

SUNSHINE GIRL OF MINE 

By Maynard & Wood. The hit song of "Bringing Up Father" Co.; etc. 

YOU'LL STILL BE MINE IN DREAMS 

By Maynard & Wood. A 6/8 .ballad. Sung by Carl Graves, the phenomenal baritone with Gus Hill's Minstrels. A 

triple encore at every performance. 

' .... CLAP YOUR HANDS aSSM?, 

By Nelson & Pease. A riot hit song with any audience. The whole house works with you. Get it- Everybody has a good time. 

SCHOOL DAYS, WHEN FIRST WE MET 

By Amelia Burns and Madelyn Sheppard. An original little song. Another "School Days." 

ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

MEYER COHEN MUSIC COMPANY, Inc., 1531 Broadway, New York City 

English Representatives, FRANCIS, DAY & HUNTER, London. 



September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



Charles P. Salisbury la in town on a fur- 
lough this week. ,"* "■';."" ". ■"" : "■" ' ."J"' _ 

Florence Earle -is rehearsing in John - 
Cort'8"Jn8t a Minute." 

Tom Jones sprained his ankle last week. 
aud is Et ill limping about. 

j>Alma Aoliir is~wdriing at The Cafe 

iiaux Arts. Atlantic .City. 

Gene McVey has left the Chamber lin 
Brown office to go into vaudeville. 



Will J. Evans is touring the Southern 
Loew time, doing a single tramp act. 



Boudini and Beaumont are touring the 

.Loew time, having opened' on Sept. 1. 

Enrico 'Caruso and his wife have just 
returned from a vacation spent in Italy. 

Dorothy Pembroke is to -appear in "I 
Love You," the Weber .and Anderson show. 

Fields and Edmonds will present a new 
comedy blackface act in vaudeville this 
season. . 



. Tom McNaughton and Laura Hamilton 
have been added to the cast of "The Magic 
Melody." 

The Five Ace a arc working in the Tokyo 
Cabaret and Revue, which has just re- 
opened. 

Donna -Montronne has been hooked by 
' Sol Unger to play the Loew time for .six- 
teen weeks. 



Viviette . Quinn and Henry and Laaelle 
have been added to the cabaret at 
ChurchUTe. 



June Mullin will sing the leading role 
in "The Only Girl" which Joe Weber will 
put out this season. 

Vera Michelena is to star in "My Once 

-in Awhile," by Charles. George, which An- 
ton Scibilia is to produce. 

"■• The Loos Brothers and Mile. -La Deine 
have been engaged fox Mann and Jackson's 
Rainbow Gardens in Chicago. 

Alfred Bauer has signed a contract giv- 
ing his services to the Keith Stock at 
Union Hill for another season. 



Alexis Luce, formerly with the Alcazar 
Stock .Company, has joined the Wilkes 
Players, in Seattle, as leading man. 

Fay Maine denies the report that she 
win be seen in the new play, "The Little 
Blue Devil," .adapted from the French 
farce "Th e Blue Mouse." 



The Versatile Sextet, formerly at Rec- 
' tor's, after a trip. of eight weeks in vaude- 
ville, is now entertaining at' the Bing- 
ham Hotel, Philadelphia. 

George Kinnear, last seen in stock at 
the Plymouth Theatre, Boston, opened 
Monday night in Washington in the 
juvenile role in "PoUyanna." 

Helerie Francis, sister of Lois Josephine, 
is replacing Irene Olsen in the ingenue 
part in "The Greenwich . Village Follies," 
Miss Olsen being ill with appendicitis. 

Perry and Gorman have organized a 
specialty '.'show consisting of novelty and 
dare-devil acta which will open at Pitts- 
field, Me., during Old Home Week, for a 
five-week tour. 



Babe Artrackle, Hart and Wilson, .Maty 
Jane and Ida Gumfer are working at the 
Cafe de Beaux Arts, Atlantic City, being 
managed by Charles Jeter, formerly of the 
team of Jeter and Rogers. 

Mart J. Berman, erstwhile vaudeville 
performer and at present in the dress 
business, arranged a' benefit performance 
a week ago Sunday at the Savoy The- 
atre, Anbury Park, N. J, which netted 
the Beth David Hospital 'of New York 
$l,8«0t : " >"" ""■' :'"■:"■:'■■'. T.-''- *■"■ 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



. June Korle, soprano, Sb now singing at 
Churchill's. - 

Jean Bowers has .joined the chorus of 

Maxim's revue. ; . .-,: 

Lillian Green, assistant to Hat Sobel in 
the Strand building, is to be married this 
week..' .■ iV '. 

Joe Shea -is booking eight acts into the 
Gaiety and Star theatres in Brooklyn, 
Sundays. 



play 
Harr 



Green and Myra have been- routed to 
the Keith time for. forty weeks by. 
■y Weber.' 

Nina Davis, who has just returned from 
the coast, has been booked for a tour of 
the W. V.M. A. 



Audrey Baird has signed to appear in 
"My Once in a While," which the Scibilia 
company will present. 

Dorothy Doner, of the Kesaler and 

Burke offices, in the Strand building, is 
back- from her vacation. 



Blanche Seymour, back from a strenu- 
ous tour, of the camps, overseas, is doing 
a monologue in vaudeville. 

Madison Corey has just returned from, a 
nine months' absence in France in the serv- 
ice of The Over There Theatre League. 



Babe Wright, formerly of the "Puss 
Puss" company, is being featured with the 
revue at the Greeley Hotel, Newark. 



Charles H. Jones has just returned from 
a three weeks' vacation in New England. 
•He -motored 1,100 miles during the three 

weeks. 



Sid Winters, Ben Rumley and Elsie Ste- 
vens are the principals in a new nine- 
people girl act being produced by the Thor 

office. 



Lemiat Eater, well known in Newport 
society, has started a theatrical career, 
having the. role of a light comedian in 
"At 9.45."-' 



Lee Muxkenfuss will he associated with 
Arthur Klein in the vaudeville booking 
agency, not with Aaron Kessler, as previ- 
ously stated. 



Theodore Kosloff, Russian dancer, has 
signed with the Famous Players-Laaky 
company and will appear under Cecil B. 
De Mille's direction. 



Earl Pingree and company in "Miss 
Thanksgiving" opened the first of this 
week in Binghamton for ,a tour of the 
Southern United time. 



F. S. Reed is again ahead of the Bates 
Musical Comedy Company. He left the 
Robinson Circus some -time ago to rejoin 
the Bates organization. 

Helaine Moroaco, sister of Oliver and 
Leslie, who was recently forced 'to quit 
motion picture -work due to illness, has 
recovered and resumed her work 



Alvin Krech is treasurer of the co-oper- 
ative symphony orchestra, the fuU name 
of which is the New Symphony Orchestra 
of the Musician's New Orchestral Society. 

Lanra Hamilton, last season in "The 
Rainbow Girl," will be seen next in "Our 
Bride,*' which Stewart and Morrison win 
put into rehearsal in the immediate 
future. * 



Lewzitta Kelly, three-year-old daughter 
of .Lew Kelly, .was given a lawn party last 
week .'at her father's home in Freeport, 
L.' L Many theatrical children were 
present.' "'■''• 



Barry Melton is rehearsing with "The 
Dream Girt" •" 



Dolly Austin is singing at the Beaux 
Arts, Atlantic City. 

. Jack Shea is back from a month's vaca- 
tion at Saranac Lake. 



. Gilda J Gray has been engaged to ap- 
. pear at the Bal Tabarin. 

Earl Lindsay severed his connections 
with the Nat NazarTo offices last week. ' 



George Burnett is suffering from an in- 
fected leg, due to a poisoned mosquito 
bite. ', 



William H. Post will direct the re- 
hearsals of "My Once in A \Vhile" for 
Auto Scibilia. 



AI Tanner's "Dainty Maids," and Incu- 
bator, opened 'last Saturday at the 

Fourteenth Street Theatre. 



Vera Burt has opened with anew vaude- 
ville act, "Syncopated Steppers" under the 
management of Billy Sharp. 

Dunbar's • Tennessee Ten has been 
booked to play the Keith time for forty- 
five, weeks by Harry Weber. 



Tiny Torek is featured in "Dixieland, 
Yesterday and To -Day," a new vaudeville 
act produced by Billy Sharp. 

Eosina Galli, premiere danseuse at the 
Metropolitan Opera House, has • just • re-. 
turned from a vacation in Italy. 

. Theodore Kahn, of Kahn and Bowman, 
designed and painted a special Spanish set 
for Marty Brook's "Some Bull* act. 

Fanny Grant and Ted Wing have re- 
turned from San Francisco, and will start 
work on "their production with Stewart 
and Morrison called "Our Bide." * 

Clara Rose, who is taking charge of 
Willie Edelstein's offices in the Putnam 
Building while he is in England, came 
back last week after a two weeks' vaca- 
tion. ; 



George Leon, of the "Maids Of Amer- 
ica" company, was elected a member of 
the New- York Lodge of Elks No. 1 be- 
fore leaving town with his show several 
weeks ago. "••',• ■> 

Will J. Block is back in New York after 
an absence lasting six years. He is the 
author of a new play which was to have 

fone into rehearsal but which has been 
eld up because of the -strike. 



Roger Ferri has been engaged to do pub- 
licity work for CosteQo and Bernard's 
"Glorianna" company. He has been con- 
nected with a number of legitimate and 
burlesque attractions for some years. 



The Five AvaUona have been forced to 
cancel two weeks in Boston and twelve 
in New York, on the Loew time, due to 
the fact that one of the members suf- 
fered a fractured leg when he fell off the 
wire. ' 

Herman Paley, the composer, who was 
an overseas, entertainer, has returned from 
France. after spending ten meatus abroad, 
during which time he 'traveled and enter- 
tained in ten of the European countries, 
including Germany. 

BiUy Dentsch, who, until last week -was 
in the employ of Leo Newman, the ticket 
broker, has. gone into business for himself 
at 1539 Broadway, where he pays a ren- 
tal of $3,000 a year for the' privilege of 
selling -theatre tickets. '■.'•' 'f ' 



Pan! and Jrying Sum will do a new 
act, .now in preparation. 

WfUle De Beck will do a new vaudeville 
cartoonist act. ';■,'..■ 



Walter Peroral was operated on for 
appendicitis last week. 

Jack W. Haskell and Mary Bloom will 
do a new vaudeville act. — ';> 



Keo and Halmar are resting after- a 
season on the Orpheum time. 



Martha Hedman has -returned from a 
three months' trip to Sweden. 

Harry K. Morton and Zella RoaaeU have 
been engaged for "My Dream Girt." 



Virgins. Earle has been placed under a 
long term contract by Edgar MacGregor. 

Dunbar's Old Time Darkies have been 
routed over the Keith time for forty-five 

weeks. . 



W. S. Baldwin and Rae Dean wUl be 
featured in "Cold Feet," a new vaudeville 
sketch. ?; , -. 

Una Fleming and Patsy De Forrest 
have been placed under contract to Edgar 
MacGregor. 

Kobert Brister has been engaged to ap- 
pear as Paul in "The Bird of Paradise" 

this season. "■„ ' • 



Mrs. Thomas Whifiem will not return 
to vaudeville this season, but wffl be i 
in a production. 



Zeitler and Zeitler are appearing with 
the Heihle Brothers* Columbia Review on 
the Gus Sun time. 



. Dunbar's Grenadier Girls have a route 
of forty-five weeks on the Keith time. 
Harry' Weber booked them. ' 



Chas. GiOea and Ed Mulcahy have re- 
united. Patsy Smith, of the Jo Pace 
Smith office, is handling the act 



George Gats returned Monday from a 
business trip connected with his five at- 
tractions now playing in the West. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. WOlarf re- 
ceived their second child in the form of a 
newly born son recently. 

Marjorie Hast, Walter Haat'a daughter, 
makes her Broadway debut in "George 
White's "Scandals of 1919" this week.' 

Howard Eatebrook, who has been ab- 
sent from the stage and screen for a year, 
is returning in a new Broadway show 
this season. ' 



Lieut. Eugene Foxerof t Is convalescing 
at St. Joseph's House, Elberon, N. J. He 
has been ill of mastoiditis since his return 
from France. 



Harry Fentel and MHdred Cecil are fea- 
tured in a new musical comedy called 
"The Dancing Widow," produced by Au- 
brey MittenthaL 



Signora Mario Bortflio and Signer 
Kaon! de la Garca, both of the Teetro 
Madrid, Spain, are to be seen -in a new 
vaudeville singing offering caned "The 
Spanopera Singers." 

Charles WiDdns, known in vandevQle, 
was hurt in an automobile collision last 
week. He was scheduled to appear at 
Keith's Providence, but has been obliged 
to cancel the engagement. 

The Marvellous Miners, dancers for 
twenty years, and now appearing at 
Churchill's, have decided to be known in 
the future as The Marvenons Marvinj. 
The change is due to annoyance . caused 
by the similarity of name of a performer 
recently arrested who belonged to the act 
of "The Dancing Mniers." 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 




PRESENTS 



FOUR STARS FOR THE COMING SEASON 



1 ''*■■ . '' THE WONDER ORIENTAL SONG, RIGHT FROM THE WEST 




ANOTHER "HINDUSTAN "AMD"CHOriG" 3Y THE SAME WRITER 



* When Its Sunset In Sweden * 



EVERYONE USED i'^APPLE BLOSSOM TIME IN NORM 

A.REAL LYR1C ; ;BY^O,A\/e;moRRISON ; AND BARL.BL 



YOU AN 



VjE.RYONE WILL .USE. THIS. 
'N ET T — A ■ REAL M"E LO D Y 




HERE IS A SINGLE 



BLE THAT IS' GOODf FOR ANY ACT— GREAT TO- CLOSE WITH 
;KM AN AND BEN BLACK, WRITERS OF "TEARS" 



SOMETIME 



DO YOU REMEMBER ,'5sO M E WH ER E?" ; IF YOU DO, YOU'LL NEVER FORGET-SOMETIME" 
' THE HIT. BALLAD OF THE WEST BY J AS. SC H I LLER A N D B E N i B LACK ;■ 



FIVE OJ HE R ST A RS THATW j LIS H I N E ALL SEAS ON 



* <*!^ 



ir. T E ^rcs 



it Behind Your Silken Veil 



•BALLAD FOR FOX TROT 



ORIENTAL FOX TROT 



^ YOKOHAMA 



A JAPANESE FOX TROT 



^r OH, ANGELO! 



ITALIAN LOVE. SONG WITH. COMEDY PATTER 



Professional Offices : Pantages Theatre Bldg., San Francisco 

ORCHESTRATIONS: IN ''ALL KEYS-— 4- PROF". COPIES AND D AN CE ARRANG EM ENTS' R E A D 

CALL, WRITE OR WIRE. BEN BLACK, PROF. MGR. 



SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., Music Publishers 



SAN FRANCISCO 



September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



CHICAGO NEWS 



o^smalljheatres 

%uHn 





Closing of the Legitimate Loop Houses by die Strike, Gave 

Tremendous Increase to Patronage of Vaudeville and Motion 

Picture Houses. Even Stock Theatres Felt Increase.. 



! 



Chicago theatres, including all motion 
picture houses, reported a tremendous in- 
crease in business last week as a result of 
the closing of the legitimate loop theatres 
by the strike. At McViekers, Rialto, Great 
Northern, Hippodrome, Palace, Majestic, 
State Lake and Columbia theatres crowdn 
were daily turned away. Seats for Satur- 
day and Sunday were sold a week in ad- 
vance, and it was utterly impossible to 
secure a seat at any of the mentioned 
theatres on these days. 



In the outlying districts, the victoria 
and . Imperial theatres, playing stock, 
played to capacity audiences nightly. The 
managers of these theatres stated that 
this was splendid opportunity for the out- 
laying managers to educate their neigh- 
borhood patrons to support their own 
theatres -and not go to the loop seeking 
amusement Large signs, bearing this 
slogan, were to be seen in all the outlying 
theatres, all of which are planning to con- 
tinue the campaign. 



JEANETTE DU PREE "BROKE" 
Jeanette Du Free, formerly Mrs. Billy 
Watson, is "broke," according to a volun- 
tary petition in bankruptcy filed in the 
federal courts here. Her attorney, Frank- 
lin W. Reed, said she was "broke,", list- 
ing her assets at $100 worth of- gowns and 
her liabilities as $8,306.06. Miss Dupree 
claims, in her petition, that the six cents 
is for a bottle of milk that she was unable 
to pay for. Miss Dupree is now living -at 
1527 East 65th street, .and was supposed 
to open in Milwaukee next week, but fear- 
ing tbat^her gowns may be attached, she 
called, the engagement off. Miss Dupree 
sued Billy " Watson for' divorce' in 1908. 
She was formerly featured in her hus- 
band's show "The Beef Trust." 



CHORUS GIRL MARRIES 

Shirley Bennett, chorus girl with Ja- 
cobs and Jermon's "Bon Ton Girls," was 
married here last week to Herbert Strag- 
ser, Jr., said to be the son of a Cincinnati 
millionaire. The marriage was kept a 
secret and leaked out when the couple ar- 
rived in Chicago. A send off party was 
given the bride and groom here by mem- 
bers of the company. Mrs. Straaser will 
continue as a member of the show. 



RAISE $5,000 FOR ORPHANS 

More than $5,000 was raised by means 
of a tag day, Friday, by members of tile 
theatrical profession, for the three or- 
phaned children of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Fitch Tanner,- who were killed here early 
this week when struck by a fast express 
train while v they. were on their way to a 
picture show. A benefit performance will 
also be given f for tiie orphaned children at 
the Auditorium Theatre this week. ■ 

HERMANN TAKES VACATION 
"Sport" Herman*; manager of the Cort 
theatre, has gone, to the Wisconsin lakes 
on his long postponed and interrupted fish- 
ing trip. 



BARNES SHOWS DOES 120,000 
The Al. G. Barnes Wild Animal Circus, 
which appeared here last week did a gross 
bnsiriess of 120,000 for six performances. 



FREE 

HOW TO MAKE-UP 



Latest 

Issue of 




Writ* or Call 

M. Stein Cosmetic Co. 

t£0 WMt 31 rt Sirs**, New V*r» 



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CAZZOLO TAKES NATIONAL 

Frank A. P. Gazzolo, manager of the 
Imperial and Victoria theatres, has added 
the National, at Halstead and Sixty-third 
streets, to his string of houses and a third 
stock company, composed of Lorin Howard 
players, has been organized under the title 
of The National Theatre Players, This 
house will alternate with the Imperial and 
Victoria companies, giving each play a ran 
of three weeks. 

The opening attraction for the National 
will be "Johnny Get lour Gun/' "Polly- 
anna," which is at the Imperial this week, 
will open at the National on Sept. 14. The 
National Theatre formerly' played combina- 
tion shows and this season bad been leased 
to Irons and Clamage, who were offering 
tabloid burlesque and vaudeville there. 



WONT START BEFORE SPRING 
It is announced that work on the $2,- 
000,000 Balaban and Katz motion picture 
house, to be erected at State and Lake 
street, will not start until next Spring. 
Wreckers will take possession of the bund- 
ing at that time and the actual work of 
erecting the house will not start for an- 
other year. It is to be the largest theatre 
devoted to motion pictures in the world. 



DANCER SUES FOR DIVORCE 

Philipina Horelik, the rl»n«»in g star, filed 
a bill for divorce in the Superior Court 
last week against her husband, Abraham 
Horelik, also a dancer. The. case wfn come 
UP for hearing in October in the Superior 
court. Mrs. Horelik is represented by 
Leon A. Beresniak. 



ACTOR MADE POLICE CHIEF;. 
Duke Darrow, for a number of yearn 
a popular vaudevillian, has been made chief 
of police of Harvey, ill. He hag retired 
from the stage and will devote his entire 
time to the destinies of his home town. 

ABE JACOBS HELD UP 

Abe 'Jacobs,, manager of- the- Olympic 
theatre, was held up last week on his. way 
home. He lost $2 in cash,- a" gold watch 
valued at 5100, and his automobile. The 
day following the police found the car. 



Catering to the Profession 

FERDINAND 
BLOCK 

Attorney at,Lau> 



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Philadelphia 

Extracts ot to» £X 



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DIRECTION-SAM BAERWTTZ 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 



You Heard It All Over, But Did Not Know What It Was 



••:"''' ' : : 



"DREAMY AMAZO 




IS 



WALTZ 

Is a Beautiful Waltz Song as Well as Instrumental 



RELEASED!! 



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Lew Cooper's Hit in ShubertV "Oh What a Girl." A Comedy Rag Knockout 
The "Better Class" Ballad — A Musicianly Classic — A Lyric Inspiration 

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Not Too High-Brow for Vaudeville — But Still Has the "Concert" arid "Operatic" Stamp ; 



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THE ORIGINAL IDEA OF THIS ACT IS FULLY PROTECTED, ANY INFINGEMENT WILL BE PROSECUTED BY LAW 
SPECIAL SCENERY LYRICS and MUSIC by AL. W. BROWN 



September 10,- 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



mU&EVILEM MMJS 



B. F. KEITH VAUD. EXCH. 

i Palace — Anna Wbeaton and ilarry Carroll — 
Frisco— Eae Samuels — A Robbins and Partner — 
The Jaraland Naval Octette — (Thre e to nil). 
HEW YORK CITY. 
Riverside — Camilla's Birds— Lee Koblman ft 
Co— Stanley * Btrnea— Walter O. Kelly — "Klaa 
He"— Nonette— Cameron Slaters — Dickinson ft 

Colonial— McMabon Diamond Co. — Alfred Farrell 
Co — Moaeonl Broa. — Cbaa. King A Co. — Vlnle 
Daley— "Ragged Edge"— Lube MebrofT Co. 

Alhambre— ftaily A Houghton — Hemline Shone 

t co. Fallon A Brown— Ben Senile — BoTdonl * 

Rice — Begal A Moore — Kennedy A Correene. . 

Royal — Helene Davie — BrendeU * Bert — Breen 
Family — Diane . ' 4b Rublnl — Davta A Darnell— 
Prank Crommltt— "For Pity Bakes." 
BROOKLYN, V. Y. 

Orphanm— Dooley A Sales — Nippon Duo— Jack 
IngUs— Smith A Austin — Ella. Murrey— Mne. 
Herman — "Gantjers Bricklayer" — Kerr A Weston. 

Bushwiok— Kingeley A Benedict— Pierlot A Sco- 
neld— Olaen A Johnson — "Tell Me" — Besale OUfford 
— Tal A E. Stanton— Jai. C. Morton Co.— Mason 
ft Keeler— Lillian Fitzgerald. 

BALTIMOB.E. 

Maryland— Belle Baker— Columbia A Victor — 
Hughes Duo— Lillian A Twin Broa. — WUaon 
Anbrey Three. 

BOSTON. 

Keith's — Willie Hale A Bro. — Walter Brewer — 
Patricola — "A Rainbow Cocktail" — Cbaa. Grape- 
wln A Co. — Klein. Broa. — Louiae Gunning— EqullU 
Bros. — Ryan A Ryan — Texas. Comedy. Boor. 
BUFFALO. 

Bhaa'i — Sbaw A. Campbell— Kadle A Ramoden — 

O'Neil A Keller Jason A Halg — Rokoma. 
CHESTER. 
Adgamani — Billy Olaaan. . . , ■ 

CINCINNATI. 
Keith's — Owen MeGtveney— Clark A Bergman — 
Reynolds A Donegan — Bobble A Nelson — Cbaa. 
Wilson — Hobson A Beatty. 

CLEVELAND. 
Hippo.— Ward Bros. — Mary Howard A Co.-* 
Stella Maybew — Bonlta A Hearn— Horllck A 8a- 
rampa — Jack Kennedy A Co. 

COLUMBUS. 
Keitbia—Alan Rogers— Three Nltoa— Yeatea A 
Reeo^-Hugh Herbert Co. — Harry Tenny Co. 
DAYTON. 
Keith's— Rae B. Ban A Co.— "Flirtation"— Old 
Time Darklee— Juggling- Nelsons — Toto — McLnllen 
A Carson — Musical H unter s. 
'•* : v;.r : ' ■ DETROIT. 

Tempi* — Valentine ft Bell— Hampsal A Leon-' 
hart— Four Marx Broa.— Wallace ' Oalvin — J. 

Coorthope Co J.ickie A BlUy— Helen Triz A . I 

Sisters. ' • 

wirp 

Colonial— Hanrey, Honey A G. P. — Dare Bros.— 
R. 0. Faulkner — Ford A Drma. 

GRAND RAPIDS. 
Empress — Lew Hawklna— Moacova Ballet — Billy 
Bonner— Lady Oga Towage — "Fixing the Furnace" 
—Marine A Malay — Davla ft Pell. 
HAMILTON. 
Lyrio— Dorothy Brenner — Winston's Bea Lions — 
The Lelgbtons — "Man Bunt" — Boatoek'a Riding' 
School— Fred Payne. V 

rHDLANAPOI.IB. 
Keith's— Lohse A Sterling— Frank Gabby— B. A 
E. Adair — Dawaon Slat ers A Stem. 

LOWELL. .),■/■ 

Keith's — Miner Jc Bradford — Geo. Yeoman — 
EiMli. Heron— Margaret Padula — Doree'i Celebri- 
ties — Jordan Girls— F. A* E. Carman. 
MONTREAL. 
Princess — Joa. Bernard A Co. — Moras A Mack — ' 
Inlay A mil "Artistic Treat"— Potter A Hart- 
well— Klrksmlth Sisters 

OTTAWA. 
Dominion— J. LeVler— Sydney Phillips. 

PHILADELPHIA. 
Keith's— Conntesa "Feroo*— Geo. JeaseU— Taylor 
A Oration CO. — Belle Slaters — TJ. S. Glee Club- 
Boy Harrab A Co.—Mlller A Gerard— J Im Jaaa 
King. 

PROVIDENCE. 

Keith's— Herman A- Shirley — Oretchen Eastman 

Co.— Creole Fashion Plate— Qulxy . Fonr-rLew 
Dockatadcr— Kellaro A O'Dare — Lea Bodriouet— ■ 
Harriet Rempel Co. — The Kennedys. 

PORTLAND. ' V ' 
Keith's— Creasy A Dayne — Walsh A Edwarda — 
OrrtUe Stamni — Baxrle. GUIs — The -. Brian ta — 

Bramlnoo. . , 

PITTB8TJR0H. 
Davis— Emmett Devoy A Co. — Rae Samnela — 
Diamond A Brennan — Primrose Foor — Helton A 
Hooter— Asaki Troupe — Josephine A Hennlngo. 
ROCHESTER. 
Temple— Llda McMillan A Co. — Joe Tnwle — 
Arnant Broe — Bxicoe A Kaun— Annette A Mor- 

relle — Phlna A ' Picks — Marlon Weeks — Winston's 

Bea Lions. 

SYRACUSE. 
Temple — Bremmen A Bro. — Imboff, Conn AC. 

TOLEDO. 
Keith's— Elinor A Williams — "Mrs. W's Bur- , 
prise"— Ann "Gray— The Magleys— U. B. Atlan- 
tic Band— Bowman ' Bros.— Stars In Toyland. ' , 
■'< ' TORONTO. ' ' 

Shea's— Myers A Moon— Zardo— Jnlla Kolety— 
Worden Broa.— Helen Gleaaon A Co.— WUbur 
Mack Co.- : 

WASHINGTON. ■ 
Keith's— Alice Hamilton — Rlnaldo Broa. — Valeria 
Bergere Co. — Sinclair A Gasper — Duval A Symonua 
—Four Moyakoa — Wllllama A Wolf us. 
WILMINGTON. 
Oarriok — Seotcb Lads ft Lassies — Geo. Book— 
Rae Dean ft Co. — Herbert's Dogs — Geo. Aim- 
strong— Otto A Sheridan — Callahan Broa. 
Y0T7NQST0WN. 
Hippo. — Prosper A Moret — 8. Flaber A Cb. — 
Wright & Dietrich — Ruth Budd — Meredith A 
Bnooaer— Eddie Can Co. — Ward A Venn. 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO. ILL, 
Majestic — Spanish Dancers — Anna Chandler — 
Henri Scott— Henry B. Toomer Co.— Johnny Clark 
ft ' Co. — Peggy Bremen ft Bro. 

Palace — Alan Brooks Co. — Gene Green — Bernard 
A Duffy— Venlta Gould— Bob HaU— Bverest'e Ctr- 
cna — Bryan A Broderlck — Llbonatl. 

CALGARY AMD VICTORIA. 
Orpheum — "Not Yet Marie" — Martelle — Sidney 
A Townley— Donald Roberta — Parrell Taylor A 
Co. — Kane, Moray A Moore — Jack Marley. 
DEB MOINES. 
Orpheum — Bra Shirley A Band — Harry Rose — 
Espe A Dutton — Clifford Walker — Gardnette Broa. 

— K. A J. Connolly. I 

DENVER, 
Orpheum — Harry Wit™ A Co. — Nelson A 
Chain— Oliver "A Olp— Mason A Forrest— Bailey 
A Cowan — Chinese Bras s Bau d — The Bradnas. 
DULUTH, 
Orpheum — Winter Garden -Violin Girls— Leo A 
Cranston — William Eba — Colour Gems— Carl 

Emmy's Pets— Kanaaawa Japs — The Sbarrocks. 
■B-a-uaaa CITY. 
Orpheum— Gertrude Hoffman — Herecbel Hendel 
A Co.— Ben ft Haxel Mann — Dunham. & Edwards — 
Three Jahns— Williams A Mitchell. 

miooijr. 

Orphanm — "Reckless Ere" — Nellie Nlcnole — 
Murphy A White — Mile. Nadje — Edwin George — 
B. T. Alexander. 

. . ■ LOB ANOELES. 

Orpheum — "Putting It Over" — Mcintosh A Maids 
—Tina Lerner--8teve Jnllnaa— Lloyd A Christy — 
Marian Harris — La - Bemlcia A Co. — Marguerite 
Bylva. 

MTNNEAPOLIB. ' 

Orpheum — O. S. Jaza Band — Stevens A Holllster 
— Weber ft Bldnor — Nlta Johnson — Robbie Oor- 
done — Lydel A Macy. 



Orpheum — Morgan Dancers — Dolly Kay — Whit- 
field A Ireland — Bender A Meeban — Van Cellos — 
EnoS Fra'eer. 

Majestic— Frank Dobeon A Sirens— Nina Payne 
— Rockwell A Fox— Frisco — Nora Nm-eeue — La Rue 
■& Dnpree — Paul ft Walter In Verve. 
NEW 0RLEAN8. 
Orpheum — Donovan A Lee — Ernest Evans A Co. 
— Sam Hearn— Francis Renault. 
OAKLAND. 
Orpheom— Emma Halg — ''Current of Fun" — B. 

A J. Crelgbton — Hayden ft Brcelle — Sutter A Den 
— Vivians — Nell Lock wood. 

OMAHA. 
Orpheum -Trlxlc Friganza — Jonla A Chaplow — 
Collina A Hart— Cllffcrd A WIUs— Lachman Sisters 
— Juggling Nelapns — Harry nines. 
PORTLAND. 
Ornhsum — Nash &■' O'Donnell — Ted Doner — Dun- 
. ham A. O'Malley— Rosa King A Co. — Hay Snow— 
The Scebacks. 

ST. PAUL. 
Orpheum — Blossom Seeley — narry Green Co. — 
Flo A Ollle Walters — Ergott'a Lllllpotlsns — Jimmy 
Snvo A Co. 

RAH FRANCISCO. 
Orpheum — Julius Tannen — Boyce Combe — Wilt 
Ward A Gtrla— Geo. Kelly A Co. — Levltatlon — ' 
Royal Gascolgnca — Lydla Barry — Bessie Clayton. 
•T. LOOTS. 
Orphanm — nigoletto Bros. — Master Gabriel A Co. 
—Radjah— Jerome ft Herbert— Cortnne Tllton— 
Edith Clifford — Kltner A Reaney — Ivan Bankoft* ft 
Co. Fn ■;... 

SALT LAKE. - — - 

Orpheum— Mollle Mclntyre — Gibson A Cornell!— 
"PlanovlIle"^Oacar Lorraine — Madge Maltland — 
Alfred Wynn — Lambertl. 

SEATTLE. 
Orpheum — Mme. Ellis A Co. — Belgian Trio— Carl 
Jorn— Tango Shoes— Regay A Lorraine— Ja Da Trio 

— Burt ft Rosedele. 

SIOUX CITY. 
Orpheum— Brodean A SllvcrmooD — Dave Ferguson 
— Harry 'Holman A Co.— Sbelah A Terry Co. — 
Sterlings — Lloyd ft Christy — Georgia Price. | 
Wood. 

LOWE'S CIRCUIT 

NEW YORK CITY. 
I , American (First Half) — Angel Slaters — Knowles 
A Roberta^— Harry LarAed— Laurie Ordway A Co. 
—"Here and There" — Jaeqoe A Clark— Walter Le 
Roy ' A Co. — Boudlnl A Bernard— Irma A Connor. 
(Last Half)— Buddy Doyle- "Mimic World" — 
Bertba ft Jamea Gilbert— La Rne ft Greeham — 
Znbn ft Drela — Aerial De Groffa. 

Boulevard (First Half) — Gladys Kelton — Gordon 
A Delmar — Mr. A Mrs. Hill A Co. — Senator F. 

Murphy. (Last Half) — Mae A Mack — "Rose Gar- 
den" — Bam Howard A Co. — Clark A Crawford — ' 
('has. Mcflooda A Co. 

National (First Half) — Lawrence Bros. A Thei- 
ma — Dare Thursby— "Mimic World." (Last Half) 
— Caplane A Wella — Newell A Most — Jean Leigh- 
ton — Barron A Burt. 

Orphanm (First Half) — Oliver— Herman ft Clif- 
ton — Will A Mary Rogers — Royal Four — Taylor ft 
Francis — Brown. Gardiner A Barnett. (Last Half) 
—Musical Christies — Knowles ft Roberta — Downing 
A Bonln — ^"Salvation Molly" — Harry Antrim, -v 
• Ave. B (First Half) — Brown's Don — Helen 
MorettI — Anthony A Ross— Morgan A Gray — Ar- 
gonne Fire. (Last Half)— Magee A Anita— Dave 
Thnraby — "Fashions De Vogoe" — King _A Marvey.' 

, Delanoey St. <F1rat Half)— L» Dora ft Beckman 

—Buddy Doyle — Murphy A Klein — La Rue A 
Greaham — King A Harvey— IJbbv A Nelaon. (Last 
Half)— cowboy Williams A Daley— Angel Sisters 
— Brown, Gardner A Barnett — War. Blato — Harry 
Larned. 

Oro-ley 8q. (First Half)— Musical Christies — 
Mildred Rogers— Downing A Bunln— Bettf XUred 
A Co.— Jones A Sylvester— Cbaa. ateGooda ft Co. 
(Last Half) — Ollver-Elroy Sisters — Woolf A 
Stewart— Taylor A Francis — La Dora A Beckman. 

Lincoln Square (First naif)— Caplane A Wells— 
(Cimtinwrtf oi» pagt VI) 



TN Atlantic City the ptitier night, the 
■*• orchestra had just finished playing 
when the audience applauded vociferously, 
the performers hack stage began looking 
through the peek holes, etc., thinking some 
noted personage had arrived, not thinking 
for a moment that the outburst of applause 
was all for the little song called 

FLOATING DOWN THE 

OLD MONONGAHELA. 

Someone was heard to say: "Well, if that 
tune goes as big as all that with an 
orchestra playing it and no words, what a 
wonder it will be with a swell singer put- 
ting it over." 

That goes, too, and it has the swellest set 
of words ever. 

FLOATING DOWN THE OLD MONON- 
GAHELA has one of those tantalizing, 
fascinating, contagious melodies that won't 
leave you, with the most beautiful close 
harmony duet imaginable. Come in and 
hear it— or send for it. 

Professional copies and vocal orchestra- 
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207 W. 48ih Street New York Gty 

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!"*,» ;■ - - 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 




A REFRESHING INTERLUDE of SONG and DANCE 
AT B. F. KEITH'S COLONIAL THEATRE, THIS WEEK, SEPT. 8 



DIRECTION MAX HART 



>>///yx/y>yy/y^:^/>V/^^^^ 



mzaz2. 



f SS/?SSSSSSA//*SSSSSSSSSS/?SSSSSSJ^^ 



IT'S A HOME RUN FOR THESE TWO NUMBERS 

"SUN BEAMS" 



WONDERFUL STORY 



BALLAD SUPREME 



BEAUTIFUL MELODY. 



Who Got/ The Cherries from GeorgetsICherry Tree 

' GREAT Comody Song-GREAT Melody and Some PUNCH LINES J """• ^~~ 

FRANK eJ. GILLEP4 MUSIC CO. 
244 W. 4Gtn ST., NewiYork 



EIVIMA KRAUSE 



5 HONEY GIRLS 

D KECTION-JACX FLYNN 



JIMMY CASSON 



The AMERICAN ACE of SONG, 
with FRED KLEM at the PIANO 



SUZANNE & ERNEST 

SICKELMORE I ,F, MESSURIER 

In "Studio Fancies" 



HUBERT KINNEY & CORINNE 

' *S Soginc and Ducmt — Direction fcwfc Stawart 



AL 



MYRTLE 



MARDO & LORENZ 



Th« Wop and Th e Girl 



In VaadarOU 



3 JENNETT 

VAUDEVILLE'S PRETTIEST OFFERING IN VAUDEVILLE 

SMILETTA SISTERS 



NOVELTY DE LUXE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



EDYTHE 



DWYER & MAYE 



WORKING 



LEW FREY 



FROM OVER THERE 



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WILCOX— LaCROIX & CO 

Now Dome New Act— "COLD COFFEE" 



By CHAS. horwitz 



LOOK US OVER 

JOHN & NELLIE OLMS 

The Watch Wizards ™ 

Of VAUDEVILLE . 



ANNOUNCEMENT EXTRAORDINARY 

RAY ALVINO °=1 JAZZ PHIENDS 



FanwHr wits &*••!■ Clayton; Joan Sjnryar, Domino* Wtmm, lm<ii|, A aaaaattaa) at 

t±» Tack. Buffalo. Exponent* oi -Jan witboot Jara." Opa (or ti. |- o* UU.Ua 

DAVE SCHWARTZ. Hnsical Director, Sato Sat, M Ftftn Ava, N. W. Cor. Cad St, K T. 



ED and EDNA FANTON 



In a dainty aerial oddity. Dir. Sam 



MERRILEES and DORIA 

GEMS OF SONG AND OPERA 



September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Continued from page 25) 



Bertha ft James Gilbert— "Salvstlon Molly"— Mc- 

Longblln * Eraoa— Clark * Crawford. (Last Half) 
— Carberry * Lorimer — Jacque ft Clark — Betty El- 
dred ft CO. — Bert H.iolon — Work ft Kelt. 

Victoria (First Half) — Carberrr ft Lorlmar — 
Jane Kills ft Co.— Woolf ft Stewart — Jack Goldle 
—Three Gregorys. (Last Half)— Irms ft Connor — 
^■B'silter Le Boy ft Co.— Jones ft Sjlrester. 



Delate Girls— Mallally, McCarthy ft Co.— Barhntr 

ft Lynn. 



BBOOKXYW, at. Y. . 

Ketiopolitan (lint Half)— Work ft Kelt— New- 
ell ft Most — Grey ft Graham — Will Stanton ft Co. 
—Barron ft Bart. (last Half) — Three Gregory* — 
Murphy ft Klein— Stere Freda— Lamberti— Laurie, 
Ord way ft Co. — Her* ft There. 

Bt Kalh ( Pin t Half) — Cowboy Williams * Daisy 
—Henderson ft HaUlday — Lamberti— Wm. Slsto — 
Stafford ft De Ron. (Last Half)— Toe ValadoDS 

01 Ire Le Compte ft Co. — Win Stanton ft Co. — 

Jack Goldle — Boodlnl ft Bernard. 

Palso* (First Half)— Goldle ft Ward— Stan Stan- 
ley ft Co. (Last Half)— Joggling De Lisle— Con- 
nolly & Francis — Francis ft Bice. 

Warwick (First Half)— Msgee ft Anita— Con- 
ooUy ft Francis — Francis Rice — Friend ft Downing 
—•■Fashions Da Vogue." (Last Half)— Goldle ft 
Ward — Wild Bird — Sogers, Thornton ft Ben — 
Adrian. 

BALTtMoar, KB. 

Francis ft Wilson— Lain*- ft Green — Harold Bel- 
sun ft Co. — TJbert Carlton — Lyons ft Tosco. 

HOBOKEN, *T. J. 
(First Half) — Brown ft Erana — Doro ft Craw- 
ford—Armstrong ft Smith — Zaun ft Drew. (Last 
Half)— Peed Doe — Bet. Frank Gorman— Martin ft 
Courtney — Jane Mills ft Co. 

BOSTON, SCABS. 

(tint Half) — The Benellas — Weaton ft Marlon — 
ford ft Cnoslngbarn — Carlisle ft Bonier — Fred 
ABen — Constantlne Dancers. (Last Half) — Kray- 
taas ft Co.— Crane Sisters— Henry Frey— "Dan- 
gerous Dan MeOrew"— Wells ft Crest— Leddy ft 
Leddy. 

TAIX BXVEB, afASS. 

(First Half) — Krayona ft Co. — Henry Frey — 
■■Dangerous Dan MeGrew" — Wells ft Crest — Leddy 
A Leddy. (Last Half)— The Bananas— Weaton ft 
Marion— Carlisle ft Oomer— Fred AUeD — Constan- 
tloe Dancers. 

rUstTLTON. CA2CADA. 

Gordon ft Gordon — Nora ABen ft Co.— Henahaw 

ft Arery— Dudley Douglas— MerUn's Dogs. 
MONTREAL, CAH ADA. 
P. George — Florence King — Summer Girls ft Fan 
Gdjs— Van ft Vernon — Kenny ft Hollls. 
TCW BOG TTT TT. T . T T, IT. T. 
(First Half)— Joggling De Lisle — Haekett ft 
Francis— Adrian. (Last Half) — Helen Morettl — 
Argonne Flee. 

- - — ■ PROVIDENCE. B. I. 

(First Half) — Young ft Leander — Crane Sisters 
—Ted Heaty— La Hoen ft Dnpreeee — Barnes ft 
Freeman— Fire Petroraa. (Last Half)— Seattle ft 
Blome — Winie / Smltb— CofTman ft Carroll— Ford * 
Cunningham — L. Wolfe Gilbert ft Co.— King ft 
Brown. 

PAXEKSOH, V. J. 
OllTe Le Comte ft Co.— Frank ft Gorman — Mar- 
tin ft Courtney. (Last Half) — Baker ft Rogers. 
SPRXHGFTELD, MASS. 
(First Half) — Beattie ft Blome — WtUie Smith — 
Coalman ft Carroll — L. Wolfe Gilbert — King ft 
Brown. (Last Half) — Young ft Leander — Ted 
Healy — La Hoen ft Dnpreeee — Barnes ft Freeman 
—Fire Petroras. 

TOROHTO, CANADA. 
Dorothy Boye — Cnsdwtck ft Taylor — "Just for 
Instance" — Hoey ft Fischer — Pierres Sextette. 

POU CIRCUsT 

BBJDOEPOBT. 

Peli— Three Beam;*— Jessie Beed — Deraarest ft 
Collette — Hubert Dyer ft Partner. (Last Half) — 
Kartell! — Octavo— J. Warren Keene ft Grace 
White— Lewis ft Norton— K of C Octette. 

PUaa— Billy" Young A Co. — McConnlck ft Wal- 
lace— Sjlrester Family. (Last Half) — Raymond 
Wylle ft Co. ' ■*'*' ' ' ' 
■ HARTTOBD. 

Palace — Robinson ft LeFaxor — Mardo ft Hunter 
—Holmes ft LaYere— Ash ft Hyaros— Flee Amer- 
ican Girls. (Last Half)— Earl ft Sunshine — Mc- 
Cormlck & Wallace — McDermott ft Heagney— 
Bmlly DarreU— ^"Boaetime." 

jj STEW HAVES. ~ 

Palace — Octavo — J. Warren Keene ft Grace ' 
While — LoHmer Hudson ft Co.— Lewis Norton. 
(Last Half)— Malcolm ft LeMar— Demarest ft Col- 
lette— Hubert Dyer ft Partner. 

Bijou— Earl & Sunshine — Raymond Willie ft Co. 
— K or C Octette, (Last Half) — Billy Young ft 
Co. — Jessie Reed — B07 ft Arthur — Loney Haskell — 
Princeton GlrU. 

SPRINGFIELD. 

Palace — Lorraye ft George — MallaUy. McCarthy 

* Co. — Emily Darrell — Poor of Us — Roy ft Arthur. 
(Last Haiti— Laora ft Billy Dwyer— Henry J. 
Kelly— Bert Baker ft Co.— Mayo ft Irwin. 

SCBANTOH. 
Poli-^Jolly Johnny Jones ft Co. — Rodero — Brace 
PulTett ft Co.— Lucille ft Harris— Ed ft Birdie 

Conrsd. (Last Half) — Maxgot Francois ft Co.— 

Holmes ft Wells— GUder ft Phillips— DeFeo Opera 
House. 

WATKRBUBY. ' • 

Boll— Ksrtelll— DeLyte GUIs — McDernott ft 
Heagney— Rosetlme. (Last Half) — Three Beanies 
^Msrdo ft Hunter — Holmes ft LaVere — Lorraye ft 
George— Lorlmer Hudson ft Co. 

WORCESTER. '* .«- 

Poll— Laura ft Billy _ Dwyer— Msleolm ft Lelsar 
—Bert Baker, ft Co.— Mayo ft Irwin— Ceclle. Htdrld 

* Carr. > (Lssf Half )— Robinson ft LaFaror— Four 
'■' Tj* — FlrejilnierlcnnjGlrla. j ' •'• ' t 

P lar* Henry J.- Kelly — McCarthy ft Faye — 
Patrick ft Otto— Princeton Girls. (Last Half)— 



PoU— Margot Francois ■ ft Co.— Holmes ft Wells 
— Gilds ft Phillips— De Feo. Opera Co. (Last 
Half) — Jolly Johnny Jones ft Co. — Rodero— Bruce 
Doffett ft Co.— Lockle ft Harris— Eddie ft Birdie 
Conrad. ^. 



if* 



£. 



,-.-! 



PROCTOR'S CIRCUIT 
Cws ak Sent. I) 

MEW YORK crrx. 

aist Stn*t— "Rainbow Cocktail" — Sisal* ft 
. Blake — Marshall Montgomery — Trarers ft Douglas 
— Masters ft Kraft — Four Meyakoa. 

TUth Arenue — Scamp ft Scamp— sylrls Loyel 
Co. — "BabevUle" — Bessie Remepel — Mullen ft 
Francis — Otto ft Sheridan — Bert Howard — Loess 
ft Co.— Sheldon Brooks Co. — Lorrjer Girls — Clin- 
ton ft Rooney— "Mimic World." 

Mtfc. Street— Kelly ft Fay— Frisco Three — Bar- 
bette — Jarrow — Hendricks Bells Co. — Three Kings 

— Fisher ft Loyd — Allen. Clifford ft Barry— Mr. ft 

Mrs. Brnest Curtis— Nagtys— Rogers ft Lnm — 
Sandy Shaw— "Grey ft Old Boss"— Goldle ft 
Ward. 

Strd Street — Warren ft Bartbolmew — Williams 
ft Wolfns— Lady Teen Mel— Leonard ft WUIard— 
The Brads— Barry Girls— Welters ft Walters— 
Charles Bartbolmew— Six Military Maids — The 
Brighton*. 

TTsrl s m Opera Eons* — "Playmates" — Walters ft 
Walters— Walton ft LePearl— Clinton ft Hoooej— 
"Songbird Bern*" — Presaler, Klalas ft Saxo — 
Frisco, ft Grossman — Norman. Philips ft Ely — Bert 
Howard — George Bock — Leonard ft WUIard. 

lttth Street— Selton Brook Co.— Dunn ft Vale*** 
—Six Military Maids— MorsnU ft Deroe— Mack ft 
Esrl — Kelly ft Klein — Dotaon — Al Farrell CO. 

National Winter Garden— Maria— Mario ft 00. 

Oraad Straet — Blskely ft Bod— -SylTla Dayal Co. 

aft. Vernon— Rice ft Werner— Earl Blcardo— Al 

Shayne — B. Palmer ft Bsnd — Hunting ft Francis 

Brighton*. The — Frank Conroy Co. — Bsy Samuels 
— Henry Lewis. 

ToakSTS— Nagfys— ABen. Clifford ft Barry — 
Sandy Shaw — Mary Haynes Co. — Gonne ft Albert 
— Frlscoe Three — M. ft M. Dnrm I Barbette — Bruce 
DulTett Co. — "Bnberine" — Faber Bros. 
BSOOKXYN. BT. T. 

Oreenpcint— Pssll Lynn Co. — Rooney ft Bent — 

Dennis Brothers — Alfred Fhrrell — Tom Sawyer — 

Texas Comedy Four— Conn* ft Albert— Four Danc- 
ing- Demons. 

Prospect— Barry Girls — Tlney Daly— "Mimic 
World" — Jerome ft NeweU — Geo. Bonner — "Play- 
mate*^ — Bice ft Werner — Dressier, Klalas ft Saxo. 

Halsey — Jacquis — Max ft Redding — Less Stan- 
ton Co. — Klein ft Fraaer— Hendricks ft Stone — 
TemakI Two— Doraoo— Fleber ft Grimtb— Geo. D. 
Hart Co.— Dursnt ft Ballots— Georgia Comedy 
Four — Kole ft Density. 

ALBAsTx-, BT, Y. ■'• 

Crawford ft Broderlck — Concert ssswass— Msgic 
Glasses— Nip ft O'Brien— Freacot ft H. Bdon — 
Nolan ft Nolan— Jarrts ft Harrison— Foor Butter- 
cups— Coakley ft DtmleTy. 

ATrBBBjr, w. T. 

Forgo ft Richards — "Memories" — Art Smith 

Joredah— Altsoff Slaters— Bsrtholdl's Birds— Lang 
ft Shaw. ■■ 

ALLENTO WS , PA. 

Winkle ft Dean— Saxton ft Farrell— E. ft Berdle 
Conrsd— Billy Elliott— Foot Aaron*— BoderC— Bert 
ft Betty Boss — McCormlck ft Wlnehm — "Little 

Cottage." 

ftT.T.KBrTdlnr, PA. 

KeBom ft 0'Dslr — Alexandria— Bert Esrl ft 
Girls— Kelso ft Leigh ton— Nelson's Pets. 
BISGHAJsTOB, «. T. 

Hi ckman Bros. — Saxon ft Moore— Thomas Three 
— Merrlgian ft Howortn — Geo. Jessall — Cnsllen ft 
Koko.. 

CaMDBsT h. J. 

Three Alrcretaa — Maria ft A. Clark— Klngley 

Benedict Co.— Lieut. Gerard — Ed. Jani* ft Co 

Erford's Golden Whirl— Green, Miller ft Green- 
Mary Uaxfleld Co. — George Mack— "Secret 
Serrlce." . . 

CBX8TEB, FA, 

Erford's Golden Whirl— Green, Miller ft oreen — 
Financiers. The — S. S. Carols Three — "Secret 
Service"— Three Alreratss— Maria ft s„ Clsik— 
Kingaley Benoct Co.— Jessie Beed— Ed Jssls. 
'. CANTON, OHIO. 

The Youngers — E. J. Moore Co. — "Indoor Sports" 
—Yates ft Beed— Mortals* ft Doris— Oskes ft De- 
lour. 

CTNCTNSATT. O. ' *'■ 

Hsrrey, Henry ft Grace — Wilcox LeCrotx.Co. 

Kennedy ft Burt— Grace ft Eddie Parks— Monroe 
Brothers— Dwyer ft Wslker— Earl ft Bartlett. 

_ - DAYTON, O. 

Dorothy Richmond Co Exposition Foot— Hod- 
son Sisters— Martin ft Twist— Dewitt. Young ft 
Sister— Esrl ft Curtis— DutsII ft Lee— May Foster 
ft Co.— Morse ft Minstrels. 

KT.sTTBt, NY. 

Boa* ft Bleu — Cnsllen ft Koko — Laurel Lee 

"Love of Mik*"— Walman ft Berry— Dobb. ft 
Welch — Saxon ft Moore— Thomas Three. 
ELIZABETH, N. J, 
Dancing Cliffords— Tan ft Pierce— Baldwin Desn 
Co. — Henry Lewis — Sid Towne* — Fremont Benton 
Co.— Bums ft Frsbito— "Erery Sailor." 
EASTOaT, PAL 

k^S?^; 8 *?-^* B - Bflss— MeCoralcs: ft Wlne- 
bIB ^l Xltt,e Cottage"— Winkle ft Dean— Reynold. 
ft White — Ed ft- Bordte Conrad— Billy Elliott- 
Two -Asrons. 

- • HAZELTON, PA. 

Green ft LefeU— Henry ft Moore— Fred 
Elliott— "Jurenile FoOles"— CUrk ft LoTerc— 
Norton ft Noble — J as. F. Thompson Co 
HARRISBURG, PA. 
Wlkolia ft Kalalnkl— CUrk ft Levere— Grey ft 

Byron— Brennsn ft ' Bale — Emmet Deroy Two 

'B" 1 *— 8*arton-ft Ferrell— ;"Hotjot Tby CnlMrren"— 

,Prt. Bob Kandell— ■ 'Artcraft Berne." ., - 

_ Wlkolia ft Kalalnkl— Laura' Lee— Charles Anearn 
Troupe. 




SYNCOPATED 
BALLAD HIT 






L; WDLsFE GILBERT 



AND 






ALEX BELLEDN A 



■ - V -' 

, ■ . 

- 



& Friedland, Inc. 

232 West 46th Street, New York 




L. WOLFE GILBERT, President 



MAXWELL SILVER, Can'. Mgr. 



MORT BOOLEY NAT SANDERS 

tVaasti Opera House, OrirssTS, m. tZf Chestraut St. iassBsw*«Ms. Pa. 
CHESTER CARPFJsTEB HARRY BUSH 

tm WewcHratw At*, Datroit, Mick. Fantsges fi n Ssos Frasclsco, CsL 

. ..... ...,. v5 .. ..- _. . _. ■ r-Tom MMirm • ■-— - ■•»-- - ■*■* 

W Trsswat St, Beslsa, Msss. -. ; ')!'-" f» 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 




IN/IA13 

The Original Barbary Coast Dancer 

formerly with the Bon Tons, now with JAS. E.COOPER'S 

"BEST SHOW IN TOWN" 
At the COLUMBIA THEATRE This Week 

GREETINGS TO ALL HER FRIENDS 



B. f. Kahn's Union Square Theatre 

CAN ALWAYS USE 

GOOD CHORUS GIRLS 

Only Good Lookers and good workers should apply; 52 
'weeks a year. No Sunday work. New York engage- 



ment. 



Salary, $20.00 Per Week— No Sunday Work 

Nevtrr closed. Most altr»ctiv© engigemrnt in show Luiinrit. 
Apply in person rrery Monday. 



PRIMA DONNA 



LUCILLE ROGERS 



BON TONS 



ERNEST MACK 

Eccentric Singing and Dancing 
Comedian 



VERA HENNICI 

and Dancing Soubrette 

OWN UP BABIES 

SEE ROE1IM A RICHARDS 



DOING STRAIGHT 



STROUSE and FRANKLYN'S ROUND THE TOWN 



•••••»o»»<ooooo»o*oto««< 



I O»» » I H>OM»»«»»0« » i ^<"WW.>WWWW 



>0»00 9 00»0»*O*»0 »»O»O»»0»»»»»»»e«»»C0»»O»»»»»O»»»O»O»OOOO»»»O»O»»fr»»»»»»»»»»»»ft»»O»»»»»»0O*O0frO »♦♦#♦♦♦<?• 



I 



THIS SPACE 
RESERVED BY 



LEW LEDERER 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



MONICA REDMOND 



LIBERTY 
GIRLS 



JUNE LeVEA Y -■> GEORGE D. WIEST 



With 

SPORTING 

WIDOWS 



BARNEY 
GERARD 
PRESENTS 



EVELYN CUNNINGHAM 



FOLLIES OF THE DAY 

Direction 

ROEHM and RICHARDS 



TEXAS 
BEAUTY 



RUTH ROLLING 



"GLORIANA" 
CO. 



SOUBRETTE 



Y PAL IVI 



GIRLS 
GIRLS 
GIRLS 



soubrette BABE DePALMER 



ROSE SYDELL 
COMPANY 



NOW 

APPEARING 

WHERE? 



AND 



HOUND 

THE 

TOWN 



TRAMP 
ECCENTRIC 



O M A 3 



AGAN 



GIRLS 
A LA 
CARTE 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



IVIYR 



OHERRY 



GIRLS 
GIRLS 
GIRLS 



SOUBRETTE 



FLORENCE DEVERE 



SWEETIE 

SWEETIE 

GIRLS 



BILLY SCHULERJOHN O. GRANT 



DOING STRAIGHT 



WITH JACOBS AND JERMOrTS BURLESQUE REVIEW 



PERSONAL DIRECTION-CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 



September 10, 1919 



■a TV4: 



tfHE^NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



RUBE BERNSTEIN'S 
LATEST SHOW IS JUST 
WHAT PATRONS WANT 

Rube Bernstein need well be proud of his 
"Follies of Pleasure" this season, for, to oar 
way of looking at It, It is one of the best 
ebons be has bad In recent years. It Is a 
.real old-fashioned burlesque ; show with 
pretty girls, catchy mualc, beautiful ward- 
robe, bright and attractive scenery, and with 
good color effects and everything else to 
make It a. show that will appeal to the 
patrons of houses on the American Circuit. 

We caught the show over at the Star, 
Brooklyn, last Thursday night, and can hon- 
estly ssy that every moment of the perform- 
ance was not only enjoyed, by the writer bnt 
by everyone there. The audience laughed at 
the bits and the way the comedians pnt 
them over daring the entire evening. 

The comedy was taken care of by- -Clyde 
Bates, Tom McKenna and Manny Besser. 
Bates- is still doing his "bom" character. He 
has a tunny make-up and the different styles 
of suits and bats he wears help to add to his 
comedy. He Is also faster this season, and 
Is working hard. In fact, he always does 
work that way, but he is going harder and 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from page IS and on 32) 



faster than we have ever seen him before. 
They liked him last Thursday and laughed 
at all he did. 

McKenna la doing a dope character most 
acceptably. He does this style of work In 
his own way : and carries it out wen. He 
has a corking good voice, both for speaking 
and singing. - His enunciations are clear and 
his lines are delivered in a direct manner. 

Besser is a fait Hebrew comedian. This 
U the first season for' him with this show 
and he is working well. He has a good 
make-up and dresses his part according to 
the character. 

Sammy Kline is doing the straight this 
season. This young fellow. If we remember 
aorrectly, was doing a Hebrew last season, 
and several other comedy characters. He is 
doing a dandy straight -now. He -reads bis 
lines well and works hard for langbs for the 
comedians. He has a neat wardrobe of a 
half dozen changes. He can alng and- dance. 
. Annette La Bochelle Is the prima donna. 
This young lady Is a atately looking per- 
son and very attractive. She also wears 
pretty gowns well. She Is In a few bits 



and carries herself well. 

Ruth Barbour, a shapely and very fast 
rough soubrette, had plenty of numbers and 
put them all over for encores. She has s 
style of her own In getting her numbers over. 
She has a very pretty lot of dresses of Orig- 
inal design that are most pleasing to the 
eye. 

Lively little Violet Hilson, with her big 
bright eyes and winning ways, soon won 
favor with the audience. She was In a num- 
ber of scenes, and did very well in etch. She 
also handled her numbers the way they called 
for. Her dresses are neat and plain, bat 
rich looking. 

The "Flirtation" bit went well with Bates, 
Kline, and Miss Hilson, as did the "kiss" bit, 
done by Bates, Besser, McKenna, KUne and 

the Misses Hilson and Barbour. McKenna 
offered two numbers that were so well sung 
that he had to come back several times. The 
"love" bit, with Bates, Besser and Miss La 
Bochelle, pleased and the "wedding" . scene 
that followed waa a bit, with Bates ss the 
bridegroom, and Miss La Rochelle tba bride. 
McKenna the minister, and tbe chorus In the 



background. 

Kline and Miss Barbour offered a dandy 
singing and dancing specialty in one that 
went over fine. They sang and danced well. 
They looked neat and smart. 

Tba banquet scene was amusing. Tin 
finale of the first part, with the entire com- 
pany standing over the footlights and the 
curtain down, drew the company and the 
audience closes, together. 

The last act,, at a seashore resort, showing 
the chutes and . other amnaiiiaainla — — *»" T 
found at these place* offered plenty el fun 
for all. There waa the old bar bit Bates did 
several seasons ago, - with . soma new lilras. 
but just ss funny ss ever.' It went over aa 
well, if not better, than when we saw It last. 
There are many good situations here that are 
well carried out. 

The regular Bernstein chorus of pretty 
and shapely glrla la also present. But one 
that U missing Is Mae Mills, who has re- 
tired for tbe rest Of the season. Seldom 
does one see a chorus such aa this show al- 
ways haa and seldom do we see managers got 
the work oat of their chorea that Berastatfc 
does. The glrla can dance and stag; and 
there are several. If we had room, that we 
would like to mention Individually for thatr 
work. 



DANNY MURPHY, L D. 



(LAFF DOCTOR) 



ARTISTICALLY EXEMPLIFYING "HOW TO MAKE 'EM LAUGH," IN A CLEAN, WHOLESOME WAY, AS CO-FEATURED IN 
PETER S. CLARK'S BEST OF MANY SEASON'S SHOWS— "OH GIRL"— 1919-2* EDITION. 



FLOSSIE M c CLOUD 



. ■ . * ■■■. 

. . ■■ .'-,- ". 

"., ■ ■ i ■'.■ .. 

■ . 



THE ORIGINAL, SLIM BUT NIFTY 



WITH BEST SHOW IN TOWN 



COLUMBIA, NEW YORK, THIS WEEK 



■w*e>s>s>t)s>e>e>e)e>s>s>s)s)»« >w*w*w*»» 

ULII 

Ingenue 



RUBY THORNE and ANNA GOLDIE 

SOUBRETTE CRACKER JACKS CHARACTERS 

JACK MUNDY 




DIRECTION-ARTHUR PEARSON 



ROSE E1V11V1ETT 



RAGTIME INGENUE 



ROUND THE TOWN 



STRAIGHT 



SECOND SEASON 



WITH MAIDS OF AMERICA 



JANE MAY 

SOUBRETTE SECOND SEASON MAIDS OF AMERICA 

JULIA MORGAN 

Tbe Sophie Tucker of Burlesqu e. F. W. OerharoVe Mischief Makers, MMfc Tanks to Jss Wntoo 

ANNETTE SHAW 



DANCING INGENUE 



LEW KELLY SHOW 



PAULINE I—I JX 

CAMPBELL «_d DREW'S LIBERTY GIRLS 

JERRY LAWRENCE 



"Sky Seraper Urals" 



UUaTV 



JACK l_a.IV10.MT 



HEBREW COMEDIAN 



ROUND THE TOWN 



GEO. CARROLL, 



DOING TRAMP WITH THE JAZZ —■— ■ 



BABE H E A LY 



Soma Sonbratts, with Seen* Sa w Basses! Ssaasa with. Be— eg astsasj 



MARGUERITE WELCH 

PRIMA DONNA WITH THE VOICE 



GERTRUDE O'CONNOR 

AS MRS. BOZO WITH EDMOND HAYES' OWN CO. 



30 



THE NEW .3COII K CL J PPER 



September 10, 1919 



DO YOU LIKE CAMEOS? IF SO, SEE 

ALICE HAMILTON 

VAUDEVILLE'S "CAMEO" ACT 

j"A MtfclM L^euder^ pld fca#"j 

At B. F. Keiths Riverside week of Sept. 8th; Keiths Washington, D. C, week 
of Sept 15th; booked solid till May. Direction of Claude W. Bostock 



« 



CONNOLLY & FRANCES 



kUMboa. PfcwBM Minifa! * Rose 



THE LADDER LAD 

• IN - 

EQU11JBR1ST1 DIVERSION 



FORD & CUNNINGHAM 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



IN 

A LAUGH. A TUNE. A STEP 

DOtECnONi-LEO FITZGERALD 



SUE OLMSTEAD 

Nicknamed in the A. E. F. as "Irresistible Sue" 



chuck CALLAHAN BROS. bob 



EAST— LAURENCE SCHWAB 



WEST— C. W. NELSON 



In tha Co mady Classic, "Bahind tie Fi 
SOLID KEITH TIME — CW IACW LEWIS 



DA1M 


MICHAELS 




NEW YORK FOLLIES 


la an all star mm Maaicsl Comedy Entirlad "A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING." 




Two Acts and TwaJvw Scanaa 



LESSON IN PHYSICAL CULTURE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TECHOW'S CATS 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



HENDRIX- BELLE ISLE CO. 

In "The Schoolmaster" 



Beaked Solid. 



Direction— ROSE * CURTIS 



r 



P 



LAYS - SKETCHES -ACTS Up to the Minute Original 

and Exclusive Material Liberal Terms — Bookings Assured 

W. E. NELSON PLAYWR1TIN6 CO. Suite 402, 500 Fifth Ave., Hew York 




coughs chawing tubercular tendency 
Send roar name and address to 

ADDILINE - - 38 Arcad* Building 



TUBERCULOSIS 

It was when physicians 
said it was impossible for 
J. M. Miller, Ohio Drug- 
gist to survive the ravages 
of Tuberculosis, he began 
experimenting; on himself, 
and discovered the Home 
Treatment, known as 
L-...t Mat* ADDILINE- Anyone with 

Tuberculosis, may use It under plain directions. 



Columbus, Ohio 




la order to avoid mistakes and to insure the" 
la tola Ha*, a POSTAL CARD moat bo aaat 
ba slgnsd with your hill name- and tha address to 
una of boalnoaa foUowed by tba oendar should bo 
> tbo data (or number) of 



del I very of fas lottsW advartued 
l to forward . f otar latter. It mil 
the latter la to bo tent, and tba 

which tba lattara seat for 



Broclo. J. a 
Berry, Carroll 
Baracs, Geo. E. 
ftewM^ QiMnes 
Curm, Walter H. 
Caitle, Barry B. 



Coillm, T. 
Crninlnzhia, Joe 

B 

Chsria*. Capt 
Ttayer 

CUrton. Jos. D. 



Pale, Eddie 
Drrtne, Barry 
Edna * Psnll 
Girrtjoo, Mel 
Hunts, D. 0. 
Bb b b sbBj Ed. D. 

LATHES 



BUbaaa'i Btoel 

Co. 
fasti, 



Crydal 

1. Sttbert 



CoL O. C 

alrNan*. Jas. B. 



Bell, 



r* 



Dtlaary. Mania 
Elliott, Baati 



Gray, afaad 
GMSBSSld, BorB 



L«, Vie-dala 



alaxweD, Barry 
JMDer, rred P. 
Marlon. Bid 

Nevturt, Oil. 
Ottliaai. B. H. 
Ollfer. Oene 



Mornm. Dorothy 
OUter A Franks* 
Bobn. Iobtl 
Bead, aba. w. 



. a. V. 

williimi, Jack 



War-riek. Leia 



JEWISH ART THEATRE OPENS 

The Jewish Art Theatre can be oald to 
have justified Its existence with Its presenta- 
tion of "The Idle Inn' ("Die Paste Kretch- 
me"), the four-act romantic folk comedy by 
Perets Hlrshbein. It Is not often that an 
aggregation of player folk and other people 
of the theatre organise themselves for the 
purpose of artistic dramatic achievement and 
with their first production acheive their pur- 
pose. 

. Bat that is what the Jewish Art Thea- 
tre, which naa leased the old Garden Thea- 
tre and presented "The Idle Inn". last week 
as Its Initial offering, has done. . 

The play is racy of the soil from which 
it springs, depicting the Joys and emotions 
of humble Jewish-Russian folk of the last 
generation ; their customs, their simple talk, 
their love and forbearance for one -another 
and, above all, their eascntlal saassssssaaSS 
life is full for these hinterland Russian 
Jews ; It la evident that their's Is not a 
from-day-to-day existence, for they seem to 
be dreaming of the past and, In. their hum- 
ble way, planning for the future. 

The. story tells of two families, Bendet 
the horsedealer and his Innkeeper neighbor. 
Isaac.' Bendet has a daughter, Maite. and 
Isaac has a son, Lalblsh. A marriage is ar- 
ranged. Malte agrees to marry Lalblsh al- 
though she does not love him. She loves 
her cousin Italic, the latter a wild and In- 
corrigible youth ; a sort of Jewish Peer Gynt, 
without illusions. In the vicinity of their 
home Is an old abandoned Inn which Is said 
to be Infested with evil spirits. Isaac buys 
the old inn and plans to convert it into a 
home for his son and his son's wife. 

The wedding takes place In the home of 
the bride's parents and all the neighboring 
folk are invited to attend the ceremony. - Af- 
terward, there Is feasting and general ' hilar- 
ity and. In the midst of a general dance of 



re juicing, Itzlk sneaks into the house and 
carries off the bride. " 

He takes her into the wood near the 
haunted inn and there. In a scene which ii 
nothing- if not poetic, they plight their un- 
conventional troth. She detests him she telli 
him. He laughs. So' she flings her anas 
about him and tells him that she loves hun 
in spite of all the reasons that she shouldn't 
They are discovered In the wood by her par- 
ents and the parents of her erstwhile hus- 
band. She goes to her home and her father, 
his reason doddering because of bis daugh- 
ter's ntian»i act, suddenly leaves the house 
and sets the evilly bespirited Inn afire. Aid 
while the Inn is burning Itzlk comes Into the 
house and carries off Malte for the second 
time. 

The acting Is splendid throughout ; bot in 
the scene" in the wood, Cells Adler, who 
played the part of Malte, and Ben-Ami, who 
played the part of Itsik, distinguished them- 
selves In a truly great histrionic manner. 
They could have so- easily overplayed their 
parts, yet they acted with proper emotional 
restraint. 

WANTED WANTED 

I» CHORUS GIRLS It 

ARNOLDS NORTHLAND BEAUTY COMPANY 

Girls who have worked for me before, write. 
No. SSI East Church St., EInsirm, N. Y. 



BERT LEVEY 
CIRCUIT 

VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

Alcaaar Theatre 



SAN FRANCISCO 



DEATHS IN THE PROFESSION 



CLIFFORD BRUCE died on Thursday. 
Aug. 28, at his summer home in West 
Camp, N. T. He was formerly with the 
"William Gillette Company and later ap- 
peared in motion pictures. He was a mem- 
ber of the Lamb's He leaves a widow, 
Marie Gaber, also a professional. 



TOM CRAVEN, wen known English 
actor, playwright, and variety performer, 
died last week at Radnor, from the re' 
Bolts of a Ions; Illness caused by a motor 
accident several months ago. He was nity- 

ozie years of aare and a son of IT- T. 

Craven, dramatic actor and playwright, and 
Eliza" Nelson. Craven had appeared for 
years In his plays and sketches In the 
varieties. He had also been manager of the 
Grand Theatre, Croydon. He is survived 
by his wife. who. prior to their marriage, 
was Constance Moxon. 



•EDITH HILL, sister of Anna Hess, died 
last week after a long Illness. She was well 
known among the profession. Burial will 
be at St. Johnsville. N. T. 



GERALD DESMOND, manager of the 
rung's Cross Theatre, Darlinghurst. Aus- 
tralia, died recently of pneumonia- He 
formerly appeared in vaudeville, with a 
partner, under the name of Desmond and 
Dalton. He was about thirty years of age 
and is survived by a wife and two children. 

EDWARD CLARENDEN ("Dobby") 
DOBSON, old time mlnlstrel. died last week 
at the age of sixty-one years, from bron- 
chial asthma. Dobson, known as "Dobby" 
in former days, was the champion banjotst 
of the world. . winning the title with an 
original composition at Stelnway'a Music 
Hall in 18S3. He was well known here and 
abroad, receiving; a medal from King 
George, then Prince of "Wales. Dobson who 
is survived by- a wife and three children, 
was the father of Harry Kelly, who was 
being co-starred with Frank Fay in "Oh 
What a Girl" until the strike caused that 
show to close. Dobson had four brothers, 
also famous banjo players 



VERNON K. MOCrJI-E, a well known 
balloonist and daredevil aerial performer, 
at Ramona Park, Grand Rapids, Mich., was 
killed hist week while doing* a parachute 
stunt, when the third of three parachutes 
he used in the trick failed to open. He 
fell through a woodshed, breaking both 
arms and legs and cutting* his face. Doc- 
tors believe he was dead when he struck 
the vroodshed. . He was twenty years of 
age and bad been -performing for several 
years. He is survived by a widow and two 
children. " '•- . ' - ;* •'*••' 



EARL LLOYD, . a vaudeville performer, 
aged thirty- three, died from an attack of 
influenza and was laid to rest late last 
week at the Evergreen Cemetery. He was 
a member of- the vaudeville -team of 
Bernard and. Lloyd. . _ . 



SARAH SUTHERLAND, the fourth of 
the famous Seven Sutherland Sisters, who 
for many years were features or- circuses 

because of their extraordinarily long hair. 

.died last week at her home outside of 
Newfane, N- T-' She -was seventy-three 
years, of age end is survived by three sis- 
ters, Grace, "Dora and Mary.. -'-- •"-- 



September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 





DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL 

Roujes Mu.tJ£«»eH JhU Office. Not Laier 



Than Saturday • 



.1 ' : -i 
.if 



"At 9:45" — Playhouse; New York, lndef. 

"Ansel Face" — Colonial. Chicago. 

"Better '(Me" — Mr. and Mrs. Cobnrn — Booth, 

New York City. 
"Baddies" — Boston, Mass. - * 
"Breakfast In Bed" — Boston, Mass. 
"Cappy Blcka" — Cort, Chicago, fiL 
"Chu Chin Chow"— Century, New York. 
••The Challenge" — Selwyn. New York City. 
"Crimson Alibi" — Broadhurst, New York. 
Carmelo's Ted. Maslcal Comedy Co. — Bex, 

Omaha, Neb., lndef. 

Fort McOenry Overseas Revue — Auditorium, 

Baltimore, Md., ' Sept. 8-13. 
"East Is West" — Astor, New York City. 
"Five MUUon. The"— Marine Elliott, New 

York City. 
Grwawlcn Tillage Follies — Greenwich vil- 
lage, N. Y., lndef. 
"Gaieties of 1918" — *4th St., New York City. 
Dempaey, Jack — Metropolitan Opera House, 

Philadelphia, Sept. 8-13. 
Bltchey Koo of 1919 — Boston, Mass. . 
"Happy Days" — N. Y. Hippodrome, N. Y. . 
"Honeymoon Town" — La Salle, Chicago. 
Herrmann, Felix (Magician) — Buffalo, N. Y., 

8-13; Albany, 15-17; Kingston, 18; Poogh- 

keepsie, 19: Newbnrg, 20. 
"It's Dp to You" (A. B. A. Show) — A. of M., 

Phihu, Sept. 9-13. 
"John Ferguson" — Fulton, New York City, ln- 

def. 
-Llghtnln'" — Gayety, New York City, lndef. 
"Lonely Borneo" — Casino, N. Y. 
"Midnight Whirl"— Century, New York. 
"Monte Crlsto, Jr." — Winter Garden, New 

York City. 
"Nighty Night" — Princess. New York City. 
"On the Hiring line" — Blackstone, Chicago, 

lndef. 
"Oh, What a Girl" — Shubert, New York. 
"Oh, My Dear" — Wilbur, Boston, lndef. 
"PollTanna" — Ford's. Baltimore. Md., Sept. 

.8*lo. 
"Boyal Vagabond, The" — Cohan 4 Harris, 

New York City. 
"Scandals of 1819" — Liberty, New York City. 
"See-Saw" — Tremont, Boston, Mass. 
"Somebody's Sweetheart" — Stmbert, Boston. 
'Three Wise Fools" — Power's. Chicago. 
Those Who Walk in . Darkness" — 48th St, 

New York City. 
"Take It From Me" — Studebaker. Chicago. 
•Toby's Bow" . 

"Up In Mabel's Boom" — Woods, Chicago, W. 
"Voice in the Dark, A" — Republic, New York. 
"Zlegfeld Follies" — New Amsterdam. 

COLUMBIA WHEEL 

Al Beeves' Show— Gayety. St, Louis, 8-18; 

Columbia, Chicago, 15-20. - - 

Abe Reynolds' Revue — Empire, Toledo, 8-13 ; 

Lyric. Dayton. 15-20. 
Best Show in Town—Columbia. New York, 

8-13 ; Casino, Brooklyn, 15-20. 
Ben Welch's Show— Gayety. Toronto, Ont-, 

8-13; Gayety, Buffalo, 13-20. 
Behman Show — Stamford. Conn.. 10; Park, 

Bridgeport, 11-13 ; Newburg, N. Y., 15-17 ; 

Pougnkeepsle, 18-20. . 
Beaotf Trust — Open, S-13 ; Gayety, St- Louis. 

Bill Watson's Parisian Whirl— Gayety, Mon- 
treal. Can., 8-13; Empire, Albany, 15-20. 

Bontons— Gayety, Omaha, Neb., 8-13; Qay- 
ety, Kansas City; 15-20. 

Bowery Burlesquers — Gayety. Washington, 
8-13: GayetyrPittsborgh, 15-20. 

Bostonlans-»Emph-e,- Albany, 8-13; Gayety,- 
Boston, 18-20. 

Burlesque Review — Miner's 149th St. New 
York, 8-13; Orphenm, Paterson, 15-20. 

Burlesque Wonder Show — Gayety, Pittsburgh. 
8-13; Park. Youngstown, O., 15-17; Grand 

_ Akron. 18-20. 

Dave Marion Show — Grand, Hartford, 8-13; 

_ Jacques, Waterbury, Conn.. 15-20. 

Tollies of the Day — Orphenm, Paterson, 8-13 ; 

_ Majestic, Jersey City, 15-20. 

Girls A-La-Carte — Newburg, N. Y., 8-10: 
Pougnkeepsle, 11-13: Casino, Boston, 15-20. 

Girls of the TJ. 8- A. — Lyric, Dayton, Ohio, 

„,S-13: Olympic. Cincinnati. 10-20. 

Girls Qe Looks— Star, CleTeland, 8-18; Em- 



pure, Toledo, 1S-20. 

Golden Crooks — Bastable. Syracuse, 8-10; 
Lumberg, TJtlca, 11-13; Gayety. Montreal, 
15-20. 

Harry Hastings' Show— Jacques, Waterbury, 
Conn., 8-13; Miner's Bronx, New York, 
15-20. 

Hello, America ! — Gayety. Detroit, 8-18 ; Gay- 
ety, Toronto, Out.. 15-20. * 

Hip-Hip, Hooray — Casino, Boston, 8-13; Co- 
fumbla. New York, 15-20. 

Lew Kelly's Show — Casino. Philadelphia, 8- 
13; Hurtig & Seamen's, New York, 15-20. 

Liberty Girls — Gayety, Boston, 8-18; Grand 

„ Hartford. Conn., 15-20. 

Maids of America — Casino, Brooklyn, 8-13; 
Peoples' Philadelphia, 15-20. 

Million Dollar Dolls— Des Moines. Iowa. 7-10: 

».9»J e JZ» Omaha. Neb, 15-20. 

Molile Williams Co. — Hurtig ft Seamon's, New 
York, 8-13; Empire, Brooklyn, 15-20. • . 

Ob Girl — Empire, Brooklyn, 8-13 : Empire, 

_ Newark. 15-20. 

Peek-a-Boo — Star & Garter, Chicago, 8-18; 
Gayety, Detroit, 15-20. 

Roseland Girls— Olympic, Cincinnati. M8; 

„ Gayety. Chicago. 15-20. 

Rose- 1 Bydeil's- •hoiidOB -Belles — Ga#ety>- Ro- 
chester, S-13; Bastable, Syracuse, N*. T., 
15-17; Lumberg, Dries, 18-20. 



Sam Howe's Show — Majestic, Jersey City, 8- 
13 1 Perth Amboy, £. J., 15 ; jnajafleld, 
IB"; Stamford, Conn., 17; Park, Bridgeport, 

litfO. ...B . ■ .,,1 > , ri . •.-!• A I 

81gj)t-> 8eers— People's/, Philadelphia, ,- 8-13 ; 

Palace, Baltimore^,. 15-20. -j ■ ■ . 

Social Malds-rStar, CleTeland. 8-13; Empire, 

Toledo, 15-20. 
Sporting Widows— Palace. Baltimore, 8-18; 

Gayety, 'Washington, 15-10. 
Star and Garter Shows— Gayety, Kansas 

City, 8-13; open, 16-20; Gayety, Kansas 

City. 8-13; St. Louis, 83-J7. 
Step Lively Girls — Empire, Newark, 8-18; 

Casino. Philadelphia. 15-20. 
Twentieth Century Maids — Gayety, Buffalo, 

8-13: Gsyety. Rochester. 18-20. 
Victory Belles — Columbia, Chicago, 8-13; 

Berchel, Des Moines, Iowa, 15-18. 

AMERICAN WHEEL 

All Jasz Review — Hay market, Chicago, 8-13: 

Gayety, Milwaukee. 15-20. 
Aviator Girls — Trocadero, Philadelphia, 8-13 ; 

Empire, Hoboken, 15-20. 

Broadway Belles — Victoria, Pittsburgh, 8-13: 

Penn Circuit 15-20. 
Beauty Review— Gayety, St. Paul, 8-18; Gay- 
ety, Minneapolis, 16-20. 
Blue Birds — Englewood. Chicago, S-13; 

Haymarket, Chicago, 1E-20. 
Cabaret Girls— Lyceum, Columbus, Ohio, 8-13 ; 

Victoria, Pittsburgh. 15-20. 
Cracker Jacks — Howard, Boston, 8-13 ; 

Olympia, New York, 16-20. 
Dixon's Big Review — Broadway, Camden, N. 

J., 8-13: Majestic, Wnkes-Bsrre, 15-20. 
Edmond Hayes Show — Gayety, Newark. N. 
J.. 8-13; Army, Wrlghtatown, N. J.. 16-20. 
Follies of Pleasure — Plaza, Springfield, Mass., 

8-13; Grand, Worcester, 15-20. 
French Frolics — Penn Circuit, 8-13; Gayety, 

Baltimore, 15-20. 
Girls from the Follies — Star. Toronto, Can., 

8-13 ; New Academy. Buffalo, 15-20. 
Girls from Joyland — Grand, Worcester, 8-18; 

Howard, Boston: 15-20. 
Girls, Girls. Glrls—Bljou. Philadelphia, 8-13; 

Broadway, Camden, N. J.. 15-20. 
Grown TJp Babies — Standard, St. Louis, 8-18; 

Terre Haute, Ind., 14 ; Park, Indianapolis, 

15-20. 
Jasz Babies — Majestic, Wllkes-Barre, Fa., 8- 

1S ; Majestic, Scranton, 15-20. 
Kewple Dolls — Empire. Hoboken, N. J., 8-13 ; 

Star, Brooklyn. 15-20. 
lid Utters— Gavety, Milwaukee, 8-18; Star, 

St. Paul, 15-20. 
Midnight Maids — Empire, Cleveland, 8-13 : 

Cadillac, Detroit, 15-20. 
Mischief Makers— Gayety, Louisville, Ky., 

8-13 ; Lyceum. Columbus. O., 15-20. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Park, Indianapolis, 8-18; 

Gayety, LoulavUle, 15-20. 
"Oh, Frencby" — Century. Kansas City, 8-13; 

Standard, St. Louis. 15-20. . 
Pacemakers — (Lyceum, Washington, 8-13: 

Bijou, Philadelphia, 15-20. 
Parisian Flirts — Olympic. New York, 8-13. 
Pat White Show— Standard, St. Louis, 8-13. 
Bazale Dazsle Girls — Majestic, Scranton, Pa., 

8-13 ; Bingham ton, N. Y., 15-17 ; Niagara 

Fails, 18-20. 
Record-Breakers — Gayety, Baltimore, 8-18 ; 

Lyceum, Washington, 15-20. 
Bound the Town — Blnghamton. N. Y., 8-10; 

Nlacara Falls, 11-13 ; Star, Toronto, Ont., 

15-20. 
Sliding Billy Watson — CadlUac, Detroit, 8-13 ; 

Englewood, Chicago, 15-20. 
Social Follies — Army, Wrlghtstown, N. J., 8- 

18; Trocadero. Philadelphia. 15-20. 
Some Show — New Academy, Buffalo, N. Y., 

8-18 : Empire, Cleveland, 16-20. 
Sport Girls — Gayety, Brooklyn, 8-18; Gayety, 

Newark, 15-20. 
Stone * Plllard's — Gayety. Sioux City, Iowa, 

-8-13; Century. Kansas City, 15-20. 
Sweet Sweetie Girls — 8tar. Brooklyn, 8-18; 
Plaza, Springfield, Mass., 15-20. 
Tempter* — Gayety, Minneapolis, 8-13; Gay- 
ety, Sioux City, Iowa, 15-20. 

PENN CIRCUIT 

Wheeling, W. Va. — Monday. 
Untontown, Pa.— Tuesday. 
Johnstown. Pa. — Wednesday. 
Altoona, Pa. — Thursday. 
Winiamsport. Pa. — Friday. 
York, Pa. — Saturday 

MINSTRELS 

Al G. F-ieida — Knorvllle. Tenn.. 12-18: Aahe- 
vllle, N. C. 14-16; Winston-Salem, 17; 
Greensboro, 18; Lynchburg, 19. 

Benix Bros. — Knoxville, Tenn., 12-18; W1I 



mer 15-20. 



CIRCUS 



Al. G. Barnes' — New Castle. Ind.. 12: Green 
Castle. 13; Champaign. 111.. 16: TaylorvUIe. 
16 ; East St. Louis, 17 ; St. Louis, Mo., 18- 
21. - -Z7. 

STOCKS 

Albee Stock. Providence. B. L, lndef. ' 
Arlington Theatre - Co. — Boston. Mass., lndef. 
Alcaxar Players — Alcazar. San Francisco, 

Cal. - 

Baker Flayers — Portland, Ore., lndef. - 
Blaney Stock — Yorkrille, New York City. 
Bessey. Jack. Stock— Peoria, 111.. lndef. 
Belgrade Sadie — New Bedford, Mass., lndef. 
BrKsac. Virginia. 8tock— Strand, Ban Diego, 

CSX, lndef.- 
Brown;- George. Stock — Whale n Park. Flteh- 

trarg. Has*,., lndef. - . . 
Booth, Nellie. Players — Pittsburgh, Pa., lndef. 

Brownell-Stock — Dayton, Ohio ImltL 

Brers, Fred, Stock — Waverly, N. Y.. lndef. 
ChampUn, Chas. K. — Bed Bank, 8-18. 




MIDGLEY 



(FORMERLY OF CHICAGO) 

PRODUCER 

Room 216, Strand Building 
47th Street and Broadway 



.-■»■--•. 

-...-■■-. \ -. .- 



New York 






i 



:■• . ■ 

* ' V , * 



Hi'?' 









;r of Real Novelty 

Numbers 



■*-■ s* 1 



STAGED THE FOLLOWING SHOWS THIS SEASON 

EDMOND HAYES' OWN .SHOW . 
TWENTIETH CENTURY MAIDS 
MIDNIGHT MAIDENS 

Murray and mack's «pll say so w 
Social follies 



• *i 



NOW STAGING— 



- 


.■•- 






"- 


- 












k=* - 








-- 


:■ 


X** 



■■■■_ • •• ■ •- 

Bzederich Bowers' New Show "Look 
Who's Here,'' 

All of George Ghoo's Vaudeville Acts. 

Roehm and Richard's Revue at Rock- 
well Terrace, Brooklyn. 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 10, 1919 



MILDRED ROGERS 

The Dainty Miss in 5 Feet of Dancing 

DIRECnON-^ABE FEINBERC 

WILLIAM CONWAY 

THE HUSH PIANIST— IN VAUDEVILLE 



The LittI* Magnet in Vaudeville 



GEORGE 



BOOKED SOLID— LOEWS CIRCUIT 



ISAJBEU. 



DDL, TOM JONES 



ROBERT 



AELEEN 



LE ROY & HARVEY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ALTHOFF SISTERS 



TWO GIRLS AND THE PIANO 



DIRECTION— HARRY WEBER 



ADONIS & CO. (?) 

A NEW ARTISTIC NOVELTY 

DIRECTION-ARTHUR KLEIN 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from piffii 15 and S) 



MLNSKVS PUT ON 
GOOD SHOW TO OPEN 
. EAST SIDE SEASON 

MioeWy bas many new members In his 
stocx company at tbe Minsky Broth era Na- 
tional' Winter Garden down on the East Side 
this season. The bouse opened two weeks 
ago and baa been playing to good business 
ever since. 

There are only two old members now with 
the company, Harry Bentley and Jack Soar- 
gel. The new people, who are well known 
in barlesqne but comparatively new to the 
patrons of this house, are James X. Francis. 
George Walsh, Louise Pearson, Babe Welling- 
ton, Jack Perry. Sedel Bennett and Violet 
Pearl. 

' The bouse baa been entirely re-decorated 
during tbe time it waa closed, a new elec- 
tric sign decorates tbe front ot the building 
and new scenery has been added back stage. 
Minsky baa the same, orchestra, with two 
new pieces added since last season, which 
makes it one ot tbe best at any burlesque 
honse in New York. 

Last, week's performance, was a bit slow 
with a lot of fast numbers sandwiched in 
between. Walsh did an Irish comedy char- 
acter, using the red wing, chin piece and 
putty nose. He handled the part well, get- 
ting all the comedy that could be grot out 
of the part. Francis worked straight all 
through the show and waa the same Francis 
we always see. He is a good "feeder". 

Harry Bentley did Dutch, at which he was 
as successful as be is in his Hebrew role. 
Sbargel did his Hebrew character and we 



must say that he worked clean. He is using 
crepe this season. Jack Perry, besides pro- 
ducing the show,- works in a number ot 
scenes, doing bits. . . .. J 

• Louise Pearson is the prima donna. Her 

voice is much, dearer -than when we saw 
her last Spring. Uer ; numbers were very 
nicely rendered. She should be given more 
work In the bits, as ahe can "feed" a 
comedian. Her costumes were very pretty. 

Shapely little Babe Wellington, working 
with all her old time speed, put her num- 
bers over for plenty of encores. She is i 
lively little soubrette and wore some pretty 
dresses. 

Violet Pearl is another soubrette who 
works in the numbers and had no trouble 
in getting them over. Her auburn bair 
blended well with her costumes. 

The "table and Ice Cream" bit -went over 
nicely the way Walsh, Bentley, • Francis, 
Perry and the Miss en Pearson and Welling- 
ton did It. 

Francis offered "Chasing Rainbows" to 
well that it waa repeatedly encored. The 
number was wen staged also. 

The "Snldde" bit was well taken care ot 
by Francis, Shargol, Walsh and Miss Pear- 
son, as was the "wheel barrow" bit offered 
by Francis, Bentley, Shargel and Miss Well- 
ington. 

Mlnsky staged a very pretty finale of the 
first part In the form of a Gypsy scene, in 
which the principals and the entire chorus 
took part. An extra act. The Gypsy Trio, 
a corking good dancing act, was featured in 
the scene. Hiss Pearson was heard to good 
advantage here when she sang a, classical 
number. Tbe scene went big and was well 
staged. . Sid. 



'.'//s//s//ysfssssss///ss//ss//ss/s///ssssss/sss* 



w/rssjwfssssjrsssssrssssssjyssrssr^^ 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 



'////ss//*Y/s/s/s///s/ssss/ss///s///s//s/ss//sy//s/s, 



fSSSSSSS* VS. s/s/ss/Sss/ss/sss////////. '///////> 



IN/1 BACHEN 

Olympic Theatre. N. Y. Management— Ike Weber With Cfca*. Robinson's Parisian Flirts- 

LETTIE BOLLES 



INGENUE SOUBRETTE 



DIXON'S BIG REVIEW 



dotin MacKinnon 



JUVENILE— TENOR 



EDMOND HAYES' OWN SHOW 



SOUBRETTE 



RUBE BERNSTEIN'S FOLLIES OF PLEASURE 



BABE WELLINGTON 

n«ESlSTJBLE BUNCH OF NERVES SOUBRETTE— NATIONAL WINTER-GARDEN 

WM. F. (Billy) HARMS THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 

HOBOKEN. N. J. (Member of T. B. C) 

FLORENCE WHITFORD 

SOUBRETTE JAZZ BABBIES 

ANNETTE LA ROCHELLE 



PRIMA DONNA 



RUBE BERNSTEIN'S FOLLIES OF PLEASURE 



ETHEL DEVEAUX 



SOUBRETTE 



HASTINGS RAZZLE DAZZLE OF 1M» 



LEADING WOMAN 



WITH DIXON'S BIG REVIEW 



LORETTA AHEARN 

PAINT Y SINGING AND DANCING SQVBKtLl Ikr-twmjm DOLLS 

ANNA DOUGHERTY 

INGENUE 

"GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS" COMPANY 

HAROLD KENNEDY 



LOUISE PEARSON 



PRIMA DONNA 



MINSKY-S NATIONAL WINTER GARDEN 



FRANK MALLAHAN 



DOING STRAIGHT 



WITH SAM HOWE'S SPORT GIRLS 



•JIIVI MeCAULEY 



DOING RUBE AGAIN 



THIS SEASON WITH SAM HOWE'S SPORT GIRLS 



frank BURKE AND WALCH BttiY 



CHARACTERS AND JUVENILE— COMEDIAN 



WITH -GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS" 



FRANK LULEY 



EDMOND HAYES' ORIGINAL BOZO 



WITH EDMOND HAYES' OWN COMPANY 



FRANK ANDERS 

Irish Comic with Chaa. M. Baker's "Sweet Sweetie Girls." Coming Up One Rons at a Time 



A BOZO BORN EVERY MINUTE 
Bozos May Come and Bozos May Go, but Rats Live On Forever. 

EDMOND HAYES 

TAKE IT AS YOU PLEASE. 



IRENE 

IN SPECIAL SON^ 



JACQUES 



AND DAY LOUISE 

DIRECTION-ROSALIE STEWART 



IRENE LEAKY 



INGENUE 



BURLESQUE REVIEW 



SHIRLEY MALLETTE 



COMEDIAN 



GIRLS A LA CARTS WITH PACEMAKERS 




September 10, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



:•< *V .::•. 



STRIKE OVER, EQUITY NOW FACES FIDELITY OPPOSITION 



(Continued from page 3) 



When asked in what . respect, Turner 
said that the arbitration clause as it now 
stands is more satisfactory to the Equity. 
In the terms that were rejected, this 
clause called for two arbiters, one from 
the managers and '.one. from the Equity, 
and, in the event that they could not 
agree, they were to choose a third. In 
the agrement as finally accepted, the 
third is chosen for them, there being 
three permanent umpires, each of whom 
acts once m three times to sit with the 
arbiters and settle whatever point is in 
question. 

The agreement gives the strikers, in 
some particulars, more than they asked 
for, allowing them to enjoy the leniency 
of the Fidelity contract. The Equity 
asked for recognition. They got it, but 
it is doubtful from the attitude of Equity 
members and some of the mutterings of 
the last few days whether they wanted 
Fidelity to enjoy the fruits of an Equity 
victory. The Equity also asked for arbi- 
tration; the managers have acceded to 
' their demand. The Equity asked for half 
pay after a certain rehearsal period; the 
managers are granting them full pay. 

According to Turner, there will, in 
future, be two contracts; one between the 
Equity and the P. M. A., and the other 
between the individual actor and the man- 
ager. But the latter contract, if the actor 
is an Equity member, shall embody no 
terms that are not stipulated for in the 
"principal contract," that is, the contract 
between the Equity and the P. M. A. 

Although it was not announced at the 
meeting, these contracts are binding until 
June, 1924. 

In telling of the agreement, Turner 
stated' that the keynote and backbone of 
the agreement was the arbitration clause. 
He did not explain to the audience why 
it was that a contract almost identical in 
form to the one that' had been rejected 
a few days before had been accepted, nor 
did any one attempt to explain what had 
taken place * behind the closed doors at 
the Hotel St. Regis where the "peace 
tribunal" had its historic session. 

Every' dispute which can now arise. Turner 
explained, mast be promptly submitted to a 
board of arbitration, from which there can 
be no appeal during the life of the agreement. 
The umpires will be permanent and win con- 
tain a membership whose reputations are be- 
yond reproach. 

There will be no coercion of Equity mem- 
bers by the managers, and there shall he no 
unjust discrimination against any one. This 
clause has given vent to much dissatisfac- 
tion In some Equity circles, where It Is 
claimed that. In this way, Fidelity shares a 
victory with the Equity, If, in fact, they are 
not actually the victors. 

The agreement further stipulates that 
there shall be no blacklist and provides 
against this In any form. ' 

The Individual contracts remain the same 
except that, after four weeks of rehearsals, 
there sbal be full pay. In musical produc- 
tions, Ave weeks' rehearsing la allowed. 
Eight performances shall constitute a week's 
end and, for every other performance, the 
actor shall receive one-eighth of a week's 
pay. After this year, there shall be full pay 
for Easter and Holy Week. 

There Is also a clause In the contract that 
virtually amounts to a statement of. the right 
of the managers to have an "open shop" In 
their theatres. 

Strikers do not necessarily assume their 
"status quo" In current productions. If 
some one else has been engaged to fill a 
striker's part, the services of the newcomer 
may be retained by the manager, if he so 
desires, as long as he makes a "satisfactory 
adjustment" with .the striker. On the other 
bond, if be re-employs the striker, he moat 
make a reasonable adjustment with the man 
who was acting as a substitute. 

"Our contract." declared Turner, "deals 
solely with the Equity, the International 
alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, the 
American Federation of Musicians and the 
Producing Managers* Association, and they 
have all underwritten It and stand behind it_" 
All wearing apparel necessary In a produc- 
tion will be furnished free by the managers. 
The chorus girls will receive a minimum 
wage of $30 per week in New York and $35 
on the road. 

When the- contract was read to Equity 
members at their headquarters on Monday, It 
was met with approval on the one hand and 
dissatisfaction on the other. 

"But What about oqr Jobs7" shouted one 
of the members, and hla cry was taken up 
by about fifteen others, who had been on 



strike and now And that their old jobs are 
no longer waiting; for them. It was explained 
by Attorney W. B. Bubln that, in cases 
where actors did .not resume their "status 
quo," a reasonable settlement would be made 
AMth them,: to be determined by an arbitration 
Board. ^ - n '- • •— « - 

Dissatisfaction was also manifested among 
a number of strikers who had gone back to 
their old roles, only to find that a "two 
weeks' notice" was waiting for them. The 
chief offender in point seemed to be "A Royal 
Vagabond," and when the matter was 
brought to the attention of the Cohan and 
Harris office. It was explained that, if there 
were any such cases. It was only instances 
where actors did not hold a contract for the 
present season. 

Although Shuberfs "Gaieties" la to re- 
open tonight /Wednesday), Ed. Wynne In- 
formed The Clippeb that he had been given 
no notice to appear for rehearsal and It has 
been Intimated that the managers do. not 
care to employ Wynne because of the par- 
ticularly aggressive stand he assumed In the 
strike. New additions to the "Gaieties" show 
are Nora Bayes, Irving Fischer and Henry 
Lewis. 

On Saturday night, William A. Brady made 
hla last stage appearance in "At 0.45." 

No announcement has been made of any 
attempt to reopen "She's a Good Fellow," 
which was playing at the Sbubert. 

On Saturday night, the first five "dark" 
shows opened and all did capacity business. 
The actors left strike talk at the stage en- 
trance and performances and rehearsals went 
on just as if there had never been a walk- 
out. In "A Voice In the Dark," Richard 
Gordon and Olive Wyndham played the op- 
posite leading roles, one an ardent Equity 
member and the other one of Fidelity's chief 
sponsors. But the performance went on 
without a hitch. "Lusmore" and "A Reg- 
ular Feller," at the Henry MUler and Cort, j 
respectively, also bad premieres on Tuesday. 
"Lusmore" was Mrs. Chauncey Olcott's play 
that hit the rocks when the stage hands 
served n otice on it so unexpectedly some ten 
days ago. 

According to Charles Emerson Cook, the , 
producer of "A Regular Feller," the rehearsal 
went with the snap of a mid-season perform- 
ance and not a line nor a situation was 
missed, ; 

"Up From Nowhere," which had been 
scheduled to open night after night during 
the strike, finally -fulfilled Its promise on 
Monday, taking the Comedy Theatre out of 
darkness. 

Thurston the Magician, and the Gallo 
Opera Company, both of which' had well 
laid plans go astray when Charles A. Shay 
told his stage hands to quit, opened at last 
on Monday night, at the Globe and the 
Shubert, respectively.- 

There are now twenty-eight productions 
playing on Broadway and a delayed season Is 
at last on its way. 

All shows that were being produced by 
the Equity have been dissolved, it had been 
Intimated that the Equity would continue to 
produce, regardless of the outcome of the 
strike, but Earle' Booth, in charge of the 
Equity entertainments, admitted that he did 
not know what would happen to the co- 
operative theatre plan and that, for the time 
being, at any rate, it was lifeless. 

"It Is a good Idea," said Booth, "and I 
wouldn't be surprised If It were taken up by 
either the Equity or some one else In the 
near future." 

All the members of the "Voice in the 
Dark" company reedved a present from A. H. 
Woods on the reopening of the piece at the 
Lyric on Saturday nlgbt. The ladles received 
boxes of candy and the men cigars. In each 
box was a card which read, "Welcome Home." 
Peace was brought about last Saturday 
morning as a result of a conference at the 
Hotel St_ ReslB, . which lasted for seven 
hours. The meeting, which was skillfully 
engineered . by . Augustus Thomas, was at- 
tended by the following representatives : 
. For the Equity — Francis Wilson, Frank 
cillmore. Ethel Barrymore. Lillian Russell 
and Marie Dressier. 

For the Stage Hands— Charles C. Shay, 
president of the I. A. T. S. B. ' 

For the Musicians — Joseph N. Weber, pres- 
ident of the A. F. of M. 

For the Managers — David Belaaco, William 
A. Brady. Arthur Hopkins, Sam H. Harris, 
Henry W. Savage, A. H. Woods and John L. 
Golden. 

For the Playwrights— August Thomas and 
Eugene Buck. 

Attorneys— For the Equity, Paul Turner, 
Justus Sheffield and W. B. Robin; for the 
m anagers, Balnbridge - Colby and William 
- IT 11 " 1 * . 

Thomas assumed the. role of Dove of Peace 



light at the strggMtKrri of Dermis O'Brien, of 
the law firm of O'Brien, Malovlnsky ft Dris- 



coll. attorneys for Cohan and Harris. 
O'Brien talked to Thomas for several hours 
and suggested that the playwright pav a 
visit to the managers and suggest that they 
agree to meet representatives of the other *; 
factions. Following the idea.-Thomas visited 
the managers at the -offlcesu-of Cohan and 
Harris "on Thursday night; and. It/* Is re- 
ported, told them that "It would be suicide 
for the managers to continue the fight." , 

After receiving the consent of the managers 
to another peace meeting, the rest was com- 
paratively easy. 

The terms of the settlement were not an- 
nounced after the meeting, but each aide 
seemed satisfied and claimed victory. 

These are the statements of various lead- 
ers who were asked what bad gone on at 
the meeting : 

William A. Brady: "Corbett and Sulli- 
van, thirty rcunds to a draw." 

George at,' Cohan : "As I see It. It la a 
victory for all concerned. The Actors' Fi- 
delity League Is a permanent and secure or- 
ganization and has accomplished exactly 
the thing It set out to do— namely, to save 
the theatre from the closed shop. As presi- 
dent of the league I am glad to announce 
that we are proud and happy to be In the 
position we are to-day: free to act as our 
own agents, free to put our signatures to 
contracts and feel and know that no affilia- 
tions, no outside forces, can have control 
over our future in the theatre.'* 

Charles A. Shay.: "The part of the stage- 
hands In this has been to help support their . 
fellow-members of the theatrical profession. 
We have received no benefit from the 
strike; we didn't ask any. I have wired 
(ISO locale of my union to go back to work. 
I cannot make any statements In regard to 
the Fidelity League. Organized labor does 
not make a policy of recognizing an or- 
ganization that has been formed in oppo- 
sition to one affiliated with labor. As far 
aa we are concerned, the Fidelity League 
Is a private club." 

Frank Gllmore: "The meeting wss most 
Interesting. Everybody was onxlons to get 
together. Both sides were satisfied and 
friendly." 

Augustus Thomas: "There was no at- 
■ tempt by either party to get the better of 
the negotiations. The Equity will be rec- 
ognized as acting for the actors. There will 
be no closed shop. The status of Fidelity 
did not : enter Into the discussion. It was 
a . general armistice and a general agree- 
ment to take back actors and actresses, and 
no demands were made to dismiss any -ac- 
tor or actress." ' 

Marie Dressier: "It was wonderful. I 
am supremely happy." 

Ethel Barrymore: "It's all over — there's 
nothing more to it." 

But. after nil was said and done, no 
statement was given out as to. what had 
happeneed .nt the meeting nor as to -what 
had been settled upon as the terms of agree- 
ment. Everyone was as much in the dark 
as the theatres on Broadway concerning 
the terms, and. on Saturday, no further 
light was thrown upon the matter except 
that theatredom had a general impression 
that the Equity had won. 

But still a statement was not forthcom- 
ing, and, when five theatres opened on 
Saturday evening, strikers went back to 
their parts without knowing any of the 
whys or wherefores connected with the out- 
come of the theatre war. • 

All day Saturday, Equity was a scene of 
great jubilation. Mutual congratulations, 
were the order of the day at the headquar- 
ters of the strikers on West Forty-fifth 
street. Equity girls kissed each other and 
their men friends, too. And an all-day glee 
clnb at Equity headquarters sang again and 
again, "All for One, One for All, and All 
for Equity." 

"When do yon start rehearsing?" waa 
the most popular question, and notes were 
being continually compared as to when this 
or that show was going to open again. 

"What ore the terms?" was the question 
that the newspaper reporters propounded 
on all sides, only to be met with the State- 
ment: There will be a mass meeting at 
the Lexington to-morrow when yon can 
hear alL" 

The mass meeting on Sunday, however, 
was at first barred to an except members 
of the Equity and the Four As, and news- 
papermen wfio gained entrance were e- 
jected. It was explained by Grant Steward 
that the Equity would "be more than 
pleased . to admit the newspapermen," but 
that the managers* association had sent 
word to the Equity that It did not wish the 
press to be represented at the meeting. 
Later, however, three newspapermen. In- 
cluding a representative of the Clipper, 
were admitted by sanction of Frank GI1- 
: more, although no further word; had' M — 
beard from the managers' association 
gardlng the matter. 



This attempt on the part of the Equity 
to evade -publicity probably, arose from the 
fact that the members were by.no means 
unanimous in their attitude toward the way 
i! their | 'taeace conference" had acted, aa 
.-" was', evinced, at .the meeting, and it was 
... probably expected, that tbere_might be some 
| kind of a <ll»pot* within thW Equity family 
circle which might not have looked well In 
print 

On Monday afternoon, the Equity held 
another meeting at the Lexington Theatre, 
as if to make amends for the previous day, 
and Frank Merlin, who had been the cause 
of much of Sunday's disturbance, seconded 
A motion to put nn record a vote of con- 
fidence In the lenders of the organization 
and their conduct in the strike. 

It Is reported that a vote of lull satis- 
faction regarding ihe strike settlement 
agreement was also unanimously passed, 
although there were a number of Equity 
members around town who were still 
garrulous in declaring for a dosed- shop 
and against a five-year contract. 
-The agreement entered Into between the 
Equity and the Manager Association was 
as follows: 

AGREEMENT made , 1919, 

between Producing Managers' Association, an 
Incorporated, association existing under the 
laws of the State of New York (hereinafter 
termed the "Producers' Association"), by and 
on behalf of Itself and all Its present and 
future individual members and producing cor- 
porations, copartnerships, associations, indi- 
viduals and concerns of whatever character 
which said individual members or any of 
them control, manage or direct, parties of the 
first part (hereinafter ' termed the "Pro- 
ducers"), and Actors' Equity Association, aa 
unincorporated association existing under the 
laws of the State of New York hereinafter 
existing under the laws of tbc Htat- at New 
York (hereinafter termed the "Equity Asso- 
ciation"), by and on behalf of itself and all 
Its present and future Individual members 
(hereinafter collectively termed the "Equity**). 
Whereas, Differences have arisen between 
the Producers and the Equity which the par- 
ties hereto desire and have the authority 
hereby to adjust; . ; 

• Now, therefore, this agreement wltneaneth: 
In consideration of One Dollar, lawful 
money of the United States of America, paid 
by each of the parties to each of the others, 
receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and 
the mutual promises herein contained; . the 
parties hereto agree: 

1. The Producers and the Equity, except 
as otherwise herein provided, hereby release 
all claims of every kind snd nature against 
any and all persons, firms, copartnerships, as- 
sociations and corporations arising from the 
recent strike: will cause to be delivered due 
Individual releases of any and all said »ia*m«_ 
and agree that all pending litigations growing 
out of said, strike shall be discontinued with- 
out costs to any party thereto. 

2. All future contracts between "any Pro- 
ducer and any Equity members shall contain 
as a minimum at least the provisions -in the 
Standard Form hereto annexed (hereinafter 
termed the "Standard"), marked "A" and by 
this reference made a part hereof. Buch con- 
tracts shall always include the arbitration 
clause as set oat In the "Standard." 

8. All Equity members shall return to 
work and be reinstated under the contracts 
which they respectively held at the time they 
respectively ceased to rehearse or to perform 
during the recent strike, except as follows: 

a. All Equity Members holding contracts 
on the Standard form recently Issued by the 
Producers' Association shall receive In place 
thereof the Standard U. M. P. A. — A. E. A. 
form In use August 7, 1019. 

b. Equity members who cannot be re- 
placed on account of abandonment of plays 
or productions have no claims upon the pro- 
ducer with whom they have contracts except 
for unpaid services actually heretofore ren- 
dered. . ... 

Where the places of Equity members have 
been filled, the producer has the right to 
secure them engagement elsewhere on equally 
favorable terms, and will try so to do. Fall- 
ing, after due effort, to secure within thirty 
days after the date hereof, such engagement 
for any such member, the producer has the 
right to cancel the contract with inch mem- 
ber by a present cash payment of an amount 
mutually agreed. If such agreement Is not 
reached and payment made within thirty-five 
days after the date hereof, then the amount 
of such payment shall be determined by arbi- 
tration in accordance with the provisions of 
this agreement Notice of the abandonment 
of any play shall be given by the producer 
to^he Equity A ssociation within seven days 
from the date hereof. 

. In case of - plays or productions in re- 
hearsal of the time o'f the strike, rehearsals 
bald Briar to that time snail, not count In 
Anurias; the number of woeka'of rah— rsal 
of the play or production. "•'" .•; . . 
(Continued on page 34) 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



(September ; 10, 19 19 



JUST OUT 

McN ALLY'S M A C 
BULLETIN ww -* 

Price, One Dollar Par Copy. 

OttnOc collection of 139 Ml of DOT, MM S* 
ormml tioomito rnratdr astcrial, toman 
srtryUUnf that can be of law to the perforiner, no 
■attar What act of to act, a w s slS j aa, parody or 
no-la bin be ill require. ffoUrWWiniUnc that 
Mcfunyi Bulletin No. 15 U tHaxr In cnanU-y and 
better In cjuaiitj tan twr Before Ilia prtot raanoas 
aa always, ooa dollar oar copy. 
■•■ALLY'S IULUTII If. 5 contain, u» foQow- 
lat iBKart.' up-to-date comedy amtertai: 

-mABur 



IB SCIEABISS ■ IIILKUtS. 

padttft bit* 
14 ItAIIIB MIS for tao mala. 



Each act u 



11 (aiCIBAL ACTS lor mate and female. TbeyTl 



i food on any MIL 

■f-Fir 



40 SU1E-FIIE PAItOIES on all of BtveBwaf* 

latejt km hits. 
A BMF-UrTIBB Till ACT. TMi art ta a 3« 

karat. aon-Bra hit. 
A BATTLIBC •BABTETTE ACT. TbB ad k aire. 

with hnmor of tht rfb-Uckttnt ktnd. 
Al ACT FBB TWB FERALCS. Ttda act affl 

WaWHtTBtiy UlaVaU CDOd. 

A SEW COBEDY SKETCH entitled "Tha Han 

lamer." It'i a atream. 
A CIEAT BBIUMBE entitled "TaDkaa Doodle." 

It'i taiaM. bntn and bobblaa orcr with alt 
12 BIISTIEL FUST-fAITS with UnMellttlnf 

jokes and hot-snot ereej Ore tap. 
6BABB ■ IBSTBEL FIBALE entitled "At tbt ar- 
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BBBDilEDS of otaa-nra Jokes for elde-waik eon- 

mtatlon for two malaj and mala and ftmala. 
BESIDES other comedy material which li «« 

to the Taaafrina performer. 

Bemember tat price of BtBALLVS BBUaTIB 
BS. 5 to only m doUar _ per tmi «£_ wig aaai 
r™ BOILETIBS Bta. 3, 4 amaJ 9 far SZ.00, wttb 
money back fnarutaa. 

WM. McN ALLY 



■1 East UStb Straat 



Nov York 



B. F. XZXTaTB 

PALACE 

Broadway a, 4Tth 8t_ 

Mat. Dally ttl P. at. 

23. M and Toe 

Kr.ry Night 

IB. BO. TO. II. 11.80 



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FOR 



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Tel. Main ia»3 Dally 



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N«Zt Week— KEWP1E DOLLS 



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MAIDS OF AMERICA 

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EMPIRE THEATRE 

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THIS WEEK 

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EVENING GOWNS 



Aflarana and itrert 
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A. IUEB. 63 Watt t 



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W A 1M T E D 

Cleter p u f u rm m In all rata at 

JwtenTie awjbrette, aaaBaa T woaaaa at 
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All mutt bo drier, alao tool oraan on and of. 
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W. S. aWWaBR. (Sea. BeLX York 



STRIKE OVER, EQUITY MUST FACE FTOEUTY OPPOSITION 

i {Continued from, pages 3 and 33.) 



■«■« 



4. AU Equity Members shall receive fall 
pay for all service* rendered op to the time 
of their respective cessation from work during 
the recent strike, bat no par for the Interval 
between such cessation and when they re- 
sume work. 

5. Neither the Equity Association nor any 
member thereat. wiU+refnse. to perform serv- 
ices for any producer^ because of the preaenee 
In the east or production of a person or per- 
sons not a member or membere'or the Bqnlty 
Association or of the Chorus Assodstlon or 
of a person or perBOBB a member or members 
of any other association, organisation or or- 
ganizations. 

8. The Equity Association will not force or 
coerce directly or indirectly, «*" attempt to 
force or to coerce directly or indirectly any 
person or persons not a member or membera 
of such Association to become a member or 
members thereof and will order Its members 
or any particular - member under penalty of 
discipline not to force or to coerce directly 
or indirectly, or to attempt to force or to 
coerce directly or indirectly, any such person 
or persons to .become, each member or mem- 
bers. 

7. Neither the Producers nor any Pro- 
ducer will force or coerce directly or Indi- 
rectly, or attempt to force or to coerce directly 
or indirectly any person to resign from or 
sever in any manner or to any degree his 
connection with tbe Equity Association or not 
to Join the. Equity Association or to Join or 
become connected In any manner or to any 
degree with any other organisation or to 
refrain from reslsnina; or severing- bis con- 
nection with any other organization, and the 
Producers' Association will enforce the pro- 
visions of this clause by appropriate dis- 
ciplinary measures. 

8. Immediately upon tbe execution of 
these presents tbe Stage Hands and the Musi- 
cians shall retam to work in the same places 
they had when they ceased work, with the 
wages provided, by. the agreements or under- 
standings between their: . respective . organiza- 
tions and the Producers, and! shall .receive 
full pay for all services rendered up to the 
time of their respective cessation from work 
daring the recent strike', but no pay for the 
Interval between . such cessation, and when 
they resume work! 

9. No member of tbe International Alli- 
ance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Mov- 
ing Picture Machine Operators thereinafter 
termed Stage Employees International),, nor 
any member of the American Federation of 
Musicians (hereinafter termed the "Musicians 
Federation") shall refuse to perform services 
for any Producer because of the presence in 
any east or production of a theatrical per- 
former or performers not a member or mem- 
bera of the Equity Association or because of 
the presence of a theatrical performer or 
performers a member or membera of any 
other organisation or association. 

10. Neither the Producers Association nor 
a Producer shall compel, coerce or persuade, 
or attempt to compel, to coerce or to persuade 
any Equity member to pay any consideration 
for his employment to any employment 
agency or other medium through Which he la 
or may be employed. 

11. The Equity Association will not com- 
pel, coerce or persuade any Equity member 
to obtain or to seek employment through Its 
agency. 

12. Neither the Producers Association nor 
any producer aball blacklist or otherwise wil- 
fully discriminate against any person or per- 
sons by reason of his or their membership in 
the Equity Association or for his or their 

connection with the recent strike, and no 
Equity Membera sball refuse to work for any 
Producer or Producers by reason of his or 
their connection with the recent strike. 

13. In case any controversy or dispute shall 
' arise between tbe Producers' Association and 

the Equity Association, or any of their re- 
spective members regarding the meaning. In- 
terpretation or enforcement, of this contract 
or any part thereof, or with reference to the 
rights of any party or member thereof here- 
under, then and in that event any party to 
such controversy or dispute may notify the 
other thereto in writing that he wishes such 
controversy or dispute settled by arbitration, 
and In each notice shall specify - the contro- 
versy, or dispute and the name of his arbitra- 
tor, who shall be a member of his Associa- 
tion. Within live days after written notice 
has been sent. to the party to the controversy 
to whom such notice la addressed gald 
party shall. In writing, name nil arbitrator 
who snail be a member of bis Association, 
and give written notice thereof to the claim- 
ant. Said arbitrators shall decide such con- 
troversy or dispute and a copy thereof sent 
to. the Producers' Association and the Equity 
Association and to the parties to said con- 
troversy or dispute within ten days from the 
date of the appointment of the, second arbi- 
trator. The concurrence of bath arbitrators 
shall be necessary to a decision, and Lf made 
within said ten days, shall be binding and 



conclusive on all parties to said controversy. 
If the arbitrators shall fail to decide said 
controversy or dispute. within ten days then 
such controversy or dispute shall within five 
days thereafter be submitted for determina- 
tion to the following named umpires: ".» 

(i) ;, fi 



:..t..: 



,(8) nik::. 'Mf, 'J&ji ■ 

Each of aald umpires shall serve in torn as 
cases arise, and ahould any umpire die, re- 
fuse to act, nr be Incapacitated, tbe next 
umpire in the order named, shall serve in Ms 
stead. The award of the two arbitrators or 
of the said umpire shall be necessary to a 
decision and such decision, lf made, shall be 
binding and conclusive on all parties to said 
controversy or dispute. 

Tbe decision of the umpire shall be made 
and reduced to writing, and a copy thereof 
sent to the Producers' Association and. the 
Equity Association, and to the parties to .said 
controversy or dispute, and the whole dls- 



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pute shall be decided within fifteen days of 
the selection of the umpire as herein specified 
to decide ssld controversy or dispute. The 
parties* to. said arbitration shall have .fifteen 
days after said copy of said decision or award 
has been sentuBa aforesaid,' within, which to 
comply with aald ajrard.X' • W' ' > • 1 
The a rbltratora ianat xfhe umpire ; respect} 
tlvely Bhall have fuTl pofler to dfbt*mfne r the«. 
manner In which they will hear the parties;' 
the mode of procedure, and the character, 
nature and extent of the evidence to be con- 
sidered. Should the umpires selected fail 
to make an award within* the .time herein 
specified a further arbitration, after similar 
notice and time as above provided, shall be 
had by umpire next in order named under 
the same terms and conditions as to time, and 
otherwise bb above provided. 
.. All' notices in this paragraph thirteen. (13) 
shall be given by registered, mail to tbe ad- 
dressee's last known business address, and 
in addition to the' times herein. provided, one 
day shall be added for each one thousand 
miles, or fraction thereof, of distance be- 
tween the point of mailing and, the point of 
destination. In addition to the notices here- 
inbefore required to be sent, duplicate origi- 
nals of all such notices shall be similarly and 
contemporaneously sent to tbe respective 
secretaries of the Producers' Association and 
the Equity Association. ■ ■ 

If the Producers' Association or the pro- 
ducer, which ever may be a party to said 
controversy or dispute, falls to - appoint an 
arbitrator as hereinbefore provided, or, with- 
out just cause, withdraws from said arbitra- 
tion, then the Producers' Association or the 
producer, as the case may be, Bhall bo in 
default hereunder. , 

If the Producers' Association or the pro- 
ducer, as the case may be, is not so in default 
then no strike shall be called, requested, en- 
couraged, advised or permitted by the Equity 
Association, or any of its membera, until the 
lapse of fifteen days after the failure or omis- 
sion of the Producers' Association or the pro- 
ducer, as. the case may be, against which ssld 
award may have been made, to perform and 
discharge said award, and such' strike shall 
always be limited to the party against whom 
said award has been made and the corportlon, 
copartnership, association, individuals and 
concerns of whatever character, which the 
party against whom said award has been 
made controls. 

If any member of either the Producers' 
Association or the Equity Association falls 
or refuses to perform the award rendered 
against him aa hereinbefore provided, then 
and In that event, the aald Association to 
which such member belongs shall promptly 
take appropriate measures with a view of 
compelling said member -to make strict per- 
formances of, and compliance - with said 
award; and anything hereinbefore contained 
* to the contrary notwithstanding, no such 
strike ' shall be called, requested, encouraged, 
advised or permitted against such person 
who has so failed to comply with said award 
until the lapse of three days after the ex- 
piration of said .fifteen days. If the Pro- 
ducers' Association shall so request. 

14. This agreement shall continue in force 
up to and' Including June 1st, 1824. At any 
time within ninety days prior to said June 
1st. either party hereto may. In writing, 
notify' the other party of its desire to meet 
the other party in conference for the purpose 
Of negotiating tor a renewhl of- this con- 
tract npon ita present or changed terms, and 
In the event of such notice, the party receiv- 
ing the same shall, within fifteen days after 
the receipt of such notice, meet with the party 
giving such notice in order to carry on Bach 
negotiations. ..•„•! 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF., the parties 
hereto have hereunto set Their hands and seals 
as of the date- first above written. 

PRODUCERS' ASSOCIATION, 
By Sam Habxib, President. 
Abthub Hopkins, Secretary. 
ACTORS' EQUITY ASSOCIATION, 

By FaAHCls Wilson, President. 
Feins Gujiobe, Executive Secretary. 
We hereby promise and guarantee that the 
undersigned respective organizations will not 
call or go on Btrlke in any case wherein the 
Actors'. Equity Association or any of its mem- 
bers commit or committed a breach of the 
foregoing agreement. 

New York, September C, 1010. 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS, 

By J. N. Wbbxs, President 
INTERNATIONAL, ALLIANCE OF THEAT- 
RICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES AND MOV- 
ING PICTURE MACHINE) OPERATORS. 
By Chablks C. Shay, president, 
Hooh Faaxin, 
Organizer for American Federation of Labor 
for the State of New York. 



■ :r : 'W'A.-rV X E D '■ -■ 

A lady partner 'that-' fc a stank*. ' Hurt baw $1,000 
to attbt la -aaneUnt a tlO.000 enterprise. I bare Ul- 
nnwetaamt- v wm .stand the wort. rltM l u iaa Uaat fc wi No 
- B. "MATT, Canal, IB. - ■ 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



t F. ALBEE 



J. JLMUROOCK 



F. F. PROCTOR 



B. F. Keith 
Vaudeville Exchange 



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', New York) 



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B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

R F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 



Artist. Cu Book Direct by 



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WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Executive Office*, IN West 4ttfc St, New York 

JACK W. LOEB 



EDGAR ALLEN 



InhM imvi with 



12 to «, or by 



Attention Vaude ville Acts 

John Quigley Theatrical Agency, Inc. 

New England's loading Independent Agency. Vaudeville ami outdoor attractions 
for Summer. Short jump*. 184 BoyUton S«. r Bolton, Mm*. 



ALLEN 

SPENCER 

TENNEY 



STRIKE!!! 

the right kind of material, by using a Tenney Act. 
Write, wire, call or "phone. 



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arc l e iH sa u a. The contribution eboald be elgned plainly 
a the aaana . aad s hn oJd be indo i eod by the stage nuipr of the • 



£"< 



the 



™ 5?*.. So0 ** » h *»» « h ' act '• Drl»I »•»» <* other witsrieaa. Farther acknowledgment will be 
audy by the names and Bombers being wablUhod. 
Addnaa yoar ooatribtitioBa to 

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•trw roue rupen, um 9mm 


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BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisement! not exceeding one line la 
length wilt be pahHened. properly dassined, ta 
thia index, at the rate of M for one year (S3 
ii.ae.). A copy of The New York Clipoar 
will be aent free to each advertieer while tba 
*dvertiiement is running. 

LAWYERS. 

Joseph A. O'Brien. MB Broadway, New York 

City. 
Edward Doyle, Attorney, 421 Merehaau Bask 

Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 
James S. Kleiaman, Equitable Bldg.. IS 

B'way, New York Gty. 
F. L. Boyd. 17 No. La Salle St., Chicago. 

MUSICAL CLASSES. 
A. Braonuelse. 1013 Napier Ave., Richmond HOI, 
N. Y. 



SCUELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

ttl.$f%-im South High St, Calwhna. a 
SCENERY FOE HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Fa. 

SONG BOOKS. 
Wa. W. Dalaney. 117 Park Sow. New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goee Co., 10 Atwater St.. Detroit, Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
B oeton Begalia Co., 3S7 Washington St., Boe- 



THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
A. w. Geretaer Co.. 634 ath Ave. (41at St,), 
N. Y. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobeos, 271 Wcet 150th St.. New York 

aty. 

violins And supplies. 

August Gemunder A Sous, 141 W. 42nd St.. 



TAYLOR TRUNKS 

C. A T.'ivlor Trunk Works 



SCENERY 



I Dye, OB or We* 
SCHELL SCENIC STUDIO. COLUMBUS, O. 



Wardrobe Prop Trunks, *5. w 

Big Bargain. Have been used. Also a tew 
Second Band Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunki, tlO and SIS. A few extra large 
P re p eity Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks 
and Bal Trunki. 

Parlor Floor. SS W. Mat St, New York dry 



s 



TACK and WINDOW CARDS 



mo 11x14 ewes SMS 

ISO 11x14 e»di S.S0 

1,000 11x14 ewes moo 

ISO ltrJl are 9.SS 

BOO 14xtt eves 18.50 

1.000 14x11 etldl ST.SO 

(Soon est nut 4-ety Wfctt* Bask, a art evnaa 
CLOTH BANNERS 

Omeeiar 

Mill ek4h Masai. 1st or aprlfM, 
pw 100 130.00 

SlxSS. or 14x4t. 1st or sprlfM. per 
100 10.00 

(All cloth hunm si* est ftwa rood crmdt or 



19.15 
11.10 

ii.se 

1MB 

IBIS 

13.00 

ibtocarl) 



CARD HERALDS 



Out) bermlei 

cent hernial 



.S10.SS 
. U.JO 



S.O0O SUxOM' 

10.000 SHxSU 
(PHesi aa etkw l_ 
. . sad stat) 

m CAzrrrt mow ramies ubpabt. 

Union Label Maun*. 20 Yean In U» 



ws.ee 

IS. 00 



Sills 

M.00 



in. 



Just Completed 

The Into sad Made (or srrcrsl shoes sad in scats 
nsar to accept erases fDrarlsmsl tccaa, sirasclai aad 

rrlttr* MOtl W ItHOIftT. gseksl Okartar. 
■ art* 4 iauua. 12Stk SL Tsssnrn, a. T.; ar 489 

Stats St, BiaMdi. ** 



A. FURMAN 

Tbeatrkal CestiBer fir (be Bert 



NotMag too bia; nor too i 

■E eva wa Bwrja aa - ai _ Everyone ft 



4M, Haw York. 



BAL'SDREADNAUGHT 

A GOOD TRUNK AT 
A VERY LOW PRICE. 

BAL'S XX 

OUR STANDARD TRUNK 
FULLY GUARANTEED. 

BAL'S STAR 

OUR TRUNK OK LUXE 

TRUNKS 



WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 
145 West 48th St 

ar 

4 West 22nd St. 
NEW YORK CITY 



TIGHTS 

Silk Opera Hoae mad 

Stockings 
Are Oar 

QUALITY the BE! 

LOWEST. 

Gold aad Stiver Brocades, Theatrical 
Jewelry. Spangles, Etc. Geld and 80- 
ver Trimmings. Wigs, Beards sad all 

Seodi Thee tribal. ~ 



J. J. WYLE A BROS., Inc. 

(Successors to Sirgmsn and Wall) 
'■» Stlh St. Haw Tar* 



MONEY WRITING JONGS 

■a* rw31 J— lil»^ »W^oBrTS3o»^tOoTas4 U S 
C * * — !■» Dealer* la Ml lie took, mtj eat ar n> 



MILLER 



TlltUattST TMtATBKAl JM 

MAMuncTunrtSMn/imwui 

WEmEHTlr^COMftlNIES 
OF ANY SIZE 

AlSO INMYIDUALOWERS 

. menu nor suet MOotMaumr. 



NEW YORK 1554 B»o»dh»» .. 4,-$7 
CHICAGO St»u o. MOMaof Sii 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS. gTC 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAU. SbB 
Deeatnr Ave, New York aty. 

Stamp (or catalog. 



LARGEST THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER IN N. Y. 

•»>vwRwl {2S} CSMNt 

P Ur em A rr o w Tracks 

JOSEPH F. REILLYI 

137 to 448 W. Slat 
NEW YORK 
S. HXfTESNAN, CawX Mj 



WIGS 

rns. 

C. KLIPVlJtT, atFat, 44 



■aaaa aav, Jraad ass, -Ituu. 

-Drtrk. Um. »1 task. Illi itU 
gSWl_svaai Jig. 1X38. SMS, 

TkRsL^'^swSwa 
a. 3V. area U». a- Hi 



Tn TtCBaiCai. Paaat, Naw You 



ACTS CONTEMPLATING PLAYING IN THE WEST 






Get in Touch With 




, : (OF CHICAGO) 

A New Agent for New Acts 

SUITE 1211-1212- 
§B 1213 MASONIC : Wi^WliOmr90: 

' '.. "•" . t: my exclusive eastern representative is 

t ^^ - booking exclusively with ' 

O A Y" Mrf^r^C^l r^f^l^ B P Keith Vaudeville Exchange 

—r g^»miC"m A A A X# *^ ^ » ■ r 7^ * ^ Orpheum Circuit, Western 

j ^vpygtfe Theatre Building, New York City ^^S^ 8 "- 

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iii m it» in iii t| n n> id id in in m-irr 






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ftiitiBifeaS^ 



m m en m m ca m tx>- m m m o a 



■ag^jg^aEfcaj *!?£*&■&; 







THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



MARRY VON 



Sensational Overnight Song Hit. A Wonderful Comedy Lyric by Andrew B. Sterling 



VRIlJl 



JANUARY 



(YOU'RE GOING TO 



WORSE THAN 



Here is 



tration. 



Words by 
ANDREW B. STERLING 

Tempo di Maroia 



WHOA JANUARY 

(You're Going- To Be Worse Than July) 



Music by 
HARRY VON TIL2ER 




OT 



The first of Ju - ly 
Last night in. a dream 



WK. 



they said we'd go dry r And 

how. real it did seem A 




ev -Jry .one thought- there'd be noth-ing to buy — 
rasp-ber-ry sod ■ a all smothered with ere 



But yon. got yours and I got mine And 
Said peek - a - boo I'll get you soon The 




ev. . 'ry ,one was hap - py we were feel-ing fine, 
time is coming when you'll have to use a spoon 



But soonjwe'U be throughj" 
They filled you I hear . 



then 
with 




won't we. feel blue _ 
two percent beer 



No more we'll hear thatVhave an . oth .-.cr" sound*. 
But soon you'll be an ice cream sod-a hound. 



Can .-you pic-ture me 

There's drinks we can pick. 



say-ing "Gim-me some tea'!_ When Mister Jan-u - a - ry comes 'a -.round. 

_. — but not one with a kick When Mis-tcr Jan-u - a - ry comes a -round. 

Chorus. ■* 




Whoa 

Whoa Jan - u - a 



Jan • u - a - ry 



.hate to .see. 
I hate to see. 



iirnr 

you Come '"ftiim I ■ » 
you come 'round 




yn 



u • ly was might -y tough but we could get e-nougb rAnd if 'Wknew the- 
lu - 6 you made us think we could, n't get a drink But when we want - ed 




-bar. man we. could get the reg-'lar stuff. But oh 
some-thing all we had to do was wink. But oh 



Jan - u - a - ry, whoa f Jan - u - a - ry" 
an - u - a - ry, whoa Ja n - u • a - ry 




.I'm so sad I want to cry 
.So long good old rock and rye 



You're the month that's going to make my life a wreck 

Mis . ter Be - to nev • er made a hit with me 



Cause 

3=i 



Z TJL •**** 'TV T T r ~ 

I know I will turn hvi-_to a hors-es -neck Whoa r Jan-u- a - ry when you go dry _ 
i use it has-n't got the right au-thor . i - ty Whoa Jan-u - a - r y when you go dry— 

I V _f_'J__l_ \s— r-n I J7T — &~ I 5" 




You're going to be worse thanju - ly. 

__ You're going to be worse _ thanju - ly. 



Copyright MCMXIX by Harry Von Tilzer Music ?ub. Co.,222 W. 46th- St., N.Y. 



Sing It. 

Lots of 

Extra 

Choruses. 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB. CO., 222 West 46th Street, New York City 



BEN BORNSTEIN, General Manager 



MURRAY BLOOM, 



LONDON 

Herman Darrwiki.'Mu»ic Pub. Co 



CHICAGO— STATE LAKE BLOC. : 
V EDDIE LEWIS. Prof. M«r. 



BOSTON— S2H TREMONT ST: 
BILLY /HARRISON; ProL Mi,. 



PHILADELPHIA— KEITH -THEATRE 8LDC 

Suite 70S-VHARRY. LINK. P.toI.M?,-. 



Copyrighted, 1919, and published weekly bj tic Clipper Corporation. 1604 Broadway, New York. Entered at the Pi 



at New York, Jwoe 24, »»». mm aaaaajajaai nail natter tinder Act of March 3. 1*79. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 17, 1919 



VOLUME LXVn-No. S 
Price. Ten Cenll. V-00 a Year 



ACTOR HELD IN 
CHICAGO 

POLICE SAY HE KNOWS MUCH 



Chicago, Sept. 15. — Believed by the 
police' to know considerable about the mur- 
der of Mrs. Louisa Brown, widow of a 
clergyman, Thomas Palmer, a Los Angeles 
moving picture actor, was arrested here 
yesterday, and held at the May wood police 
headquarters for examination. 

In the arrest of Palmer by Detective 
Sergts. Folson and O'Brien, j ust as he 
was .taking: a train for his home, the 
police believe that the mystery surround- 
ing the death, of Mrs. Brown, who they 
found murdered in her home last Thursday, 
has been cleared up. 

.The most incriminating of the evidence, 
charged against Palmer by the police, con- 
cerns a quarrel .he is reported to have had 
with the former minister's wife shortly be- 
fore she was slain. 

Mrs. Brown, the police say sold Palmer 
and his father-in-law, a man named Stoul, 
a pony. Neighbors state that the three 
engaged in a. quarrel over the payment of 
the price, $75, and that, last Sunday, three 
days • prior .* to the murder, the two men 
went to the Brown bungalow and re-opened 
the argument. 

This report, coupled with others to the 
effect that. Palmer's face and body were 
badly scratched, as though by a woman's 
fingernails, led to his arrest. The detec- 
tives who brought him to the May wood 
jail asserted that he appeared extremely 
nervous. 

Mrs. Marie Palmer, his wife, also a 
former movie actress denied that her hus- 
band had anything to do with the murder 
of. Mrs.- Brown,' declaring that she was 
with him all of Wednesday afternoon and 
Thursday night,, the time, the police believe, 
during while the murder was committed, 

Mrs. Palmer explained that five years 
ago she met her husband while married to 
another, man, whose name she refused to 
tell, in Los Angeles. She was subsequently 
divorced and two years ago married Pal- 
mer. ~ Both were in the movies at the time. 

The Palmers, she said, moved here last 
May, on the death of her mother. Since 
that' time, she admitted, Palmer has not 
been: .working. The May wood police have 
refused to allow Palmer to be removed to 
a Chicago police station and further re- 
fuse to allow his attorney, Jacob B. Dit- 
tis, to see fcfci 

His wife, in explaining the marks on 
Palmer's race and. body, stated that he and 
she had had an argument which finally 
reached the stage where she scratched him 
up herself. 



MISSING GIRL WITH ACTOR 

Los' Angeles, . Sept. 15. — Clifford 
Mundy, a motion picture actor, twenty-two 
years '. of- age, and who disappeared for a. 
few' days last' week, has been found, with 
-Irene- Smith, aged -seventeen. The girl's 
parents, who reside at' Santa Monica, no- 
tified detectives of the girl's 'dlsappear- 
was finally located at ~ 

•€••• Wm ' 




SELLING LOEW THEATRE STOCK 

Tobonto, Canada, Sept 15.— The Ox- 
ford Securities Corporation, of this city, 
is pushing a selling campaign of stock in 
Loew's Hamilton Theatre, Limited. 

The stock being sold is seven per cent 
cumulative preferred, par value $100, and 
the price asked per share is $87.50 net, 
at which price, it is said, the stock will 
yield an annual dividend of eight per 
cent. 

The theatre is already in operation, the 
annual net return being given as $150,000, 
which is six times the interest charged 
against the entire preference share issue 
of $350,000. A quarterly dividend of 1% 
per cent has been declared payable Oc- 
tober 15 to stockholders of record Sep- 
tember 30. • 



WANTED TO STOP CIRCUS 

Kansas Crrr, Sept, 11. — The labor in- 
terests in this city succeeded in reviving 
an old "blue law," which forbade circuses 
showing on Labor Day, and attempted to 
enforce it against the Singling Brothers 
and Barnum and Bailey Combined Shows, 
which played here then. The attempt was 
unsuccessful, for the management suc- 
ceeded in convincing the City Council of 
the futility of trying to prevent people 
from seeing what they wanted to see. The 
council was afraid that the Labor Day 
parade would be a failure should the circus 
be allowed to parade also. The Ringling 
people, however, cut out the parade and the 
show was then allowed to go on, and so 
everything went along nicely. 

CIRCUS PERFORMER HAS FALL 

Baltimoee, Sept 14 — Ernest Nevada, 
appearing at the Keystone exhibition 
Show's* Circus, here, had a narrow escape 
last night,, when, in making a plunge from 
a platform fifty feet high, to a net he 
misjudged the distance. He struck the 
edge of the impetus, breaking the net 
breaking the guy ropes and causing him 
to fall to the ground, where he was shaken 
up_ considerably. He was, however, not 
injured seriously enough to prevent him 
from appearing at the next performance. 

LIONS ESCAPE IN COLLISION 

Sacramento, CbX, Sept 12.— Del Rays 
Lions, appearing here this week, caused 
considerable excitement when, as they 
were being taken into the theatre, the 
truck they were on collided with an elec- 
tric car and the doors of their cages were 
loosened. Three of the ""irnMn got away, 
but were recaptured later in the day in 
time for the performance. The incident 
caused many people to flock to the theatre 
to see the recaptured. beasts. 

"SCANDALS OF 1919" CLOSING 

George White's "Scandals of 1619" show 

will close at the Liberty Theatre a week 
from next Saturday and Is scheduled to 
open at the Forrest Theatre, Philadelphia, 
the following Monday. 

At this time it has not been definitely 
decided whether "Hrtchy-Koo" or some 
other musical show will follow it at the 
Liberty. 



N. V. A. TO MAKE 
BIG DRIVE FOR 

MEMBERS 

WANT ALL VAUDEVILLE TO JOIN 



With the object of inducing every vaude- 
ville artist who plays the standard circuits 
to become a member of the National Vaude- 
ville Artists, Henry Chesterfield, its secre- 
tary, is planning to launch a gigantic and 
active Membership Drive. It is estimated 
that a drive of three or four weeks' dura- 
tion would increase the membership of the 
N. V. A. until it includes practically every 
variety performer in America. 

The drive will be carried on through a 
system of deputies. That is, in every thea- 
tre in the United States that plays vaude- 
ville, there will be one on the bill appointed 
to act as an N. V. A. deputy. It win be 
his duty to ascertain how many performers 
on the bill are members of the vaudeville 
organization and to show whatever per- 
formers are not members what advantages 
they would gain by joining. The deputy 
will be supplied with application blanks so 
that he may sign up his converts. 

The deputy will also be furnished with a 
delinquent dues list and will be empowered 
to approach delinquent members and col- 
lect the amounts owed. 

The drive will probably last three weeks 
or a month and will be started as soon as 
the necessary data and campaign literature 
has been printed and the vaudeville bills 
have been "deputized.'' The' appointment 
of deputies is an easy matter on the 
Pantages time, where the shows travel 
"en masse," and, in a smaller degree, is 
also easy on the Orpheum time, for the 
same reason. But, on the other circuits, 
where each act travels individually and 
where the make-up of bills constantly 
changes, the system of appointing deputies 
is considerably more complicated, but is 
now being worked out 

Chesterfield states that this drive will 
also be of great statistical value to the 
N. V. A., for the deputies win be required 
to submit regular reports concerning the 
result of their activities. 



CARROLL-GRAY PIECE OFF 
Cohan and Harris have decided not to 
produce "Jim's Girl,'' written by Earl 
Carroll and Thomas Gray, on Broadway, 
but have released the piece for stock. It 
was originally intended for Broadway, but 
owing to its similarity to "The Five Mil- 
lion" this plan was called off. 



GO IN TO "SCANDALS OF 1919" 

A- new team, Moran and Mack, replaced 
Bennett and Richards in George White's 
"Scandals" at the liberty last night 



HP 






Price Is Raised 

with the issue of September 24th the CLIPPER 

•^^: I 5 ce ^*?-| er «>py- ■■•-'.■*• ■■ -$$ 

1 ' b 



FLIRTING WITH DEMPSEY SHOW 

An effort was being made early this 
week to get some Broadway bankrolls, in- 
cluding that of Larry Weber, interested in 
a rehabilitation of the Jack Dempsey show 
which, after playing in Philadelphia last 
week, dosed. The chances, however, did 
not appear to be very bright 

Many of the persons with the show main- 
tain that little can be done with the propo- 
sition unless Dempsey can be induced to 
accept a. lower salary than $7,600 per week, 
the figure he was drawing, and which was 
a big handicap. If be could be brought to 
look upon a cut in salary with favor, the 
show might have a chance to make some 
money, they say. The idea of interesting 
Weber in the proposition was to bring the 
show into New York and open at Madison 
Square Garden. 



WASHINGTON TO HAVE OPERA CO. 

Washington, D. C, Sept 15. — Wash- 
ington, not to be outdistanced by any of 
the leading cities of the country, has de- 
cided to have its own opera company, and, 
accordingly, Bolln Bond, who last season 
conducted the Community Opera Company, 
composed of Washington singers who had 
made good in English opera, has organ- 
ised The Peoples National Opera Society, 
promised to be a permanent Washington 
institution. The company will present a 
number of first class productions for one 
week each at each of the local theatres. 
It is planned to build an opera house by 
popular subscription where opera and 
kindred arts may be properly presented. 



ZUKOR GOING TO LONDON 

Adolph Zuker, head of the Famous 
Players-Lasky Corporation, is scheduled 
to sail for England early next month. The 
chief object of his trip is to rehabilitate 
some of the interests acquired by F. P. L. 
during the last few years. It is rumored 
that shortly after -Zukor's return to tibia 
country! some time in November, negotia- 
tions which are not pending will have been 
consummated, as a result of which the 
Selznick Company will he merged with the 
Famous Players-Lasky Corporation. 



COBURNS PLAN MUSICAL SHOW 
Mr. and Mrs. Gobnrn, it was learned 
last week, have practically completed nego- 
tiations for a new musical play which they 
plan to produce. The play la called "The 
Three 8howers," and the book, lyrics and 
music were written Jointly by Harry 8. 
Creamer and Turner Layton. 

If George M Cohan consents to fix op 
the book of "The Three Showers," as la 
contemplated by the Oobnrha, the pise* 
will be produced very shortly. 

SUSPENDED FROM FLOOR 
Handel. and Eos* were suspended from 
the floor of the Loew booking office last 
week for a period of thirty days, tgg— 
of a breach in ♦""'Hng courtesy. There 
was a complaint regarding their t— g>sj 
of an act and, in order to liupie— the Im- 
portance of discipline in the *>~«M"g office, 
they were suspended. 



JORDAN RETURNS FROM LONDON 
Walter Jordan, of Sanger and Jordan, 
returned last Saturday on. the Ifffraia, 
from London, where be spent eight' ■eats* 

looking over the theatrical situation and 
a c q u irin g the American brakes*** rights 
to current drams tie prodwtioeuc d ■ 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



HARRY VON Tl 



Sensational Overnight Song Hit. A Wonderful Comedy Lyric by Andrew B. Sterling 



\ZTZ 



JANUARY 



(YOU' 



GOING "TO BE WORSE THAN 



Here is 



Orches 

■ 

tration. 



Words by 
ANDREW B. STERLING 



WHOA JANUARY 

(You're Going- To Be "Worse Than July) 
Tempo di Marcia 



Music by 
HARRY VON TILZER 




Voices 



m 




first of Ju- ly 

night in a dream 



wz 



they said we'd go dry_ 
how. real it did seem. 




ev-Jry one thought _ there'd be noth-iag to buy — 
rasp-ber-ry sod a all smothered with crea 



But you, got yours and I got mine And 
Said peek • a - boo I'll get you soon The 




ev. . "ry .one was hap - py we were feel-ing fine_ 
time is com-ing when you'll have to use a spoon. 



J— «S r the 



But sqgn_we*U be through_>"^ ' then 
.They filled you I hear with 




won't we, feel blue _ 
two percent beer 



'No more we'll hear that" have an ■ oth-.er" s6uhd r __ "Can .-you picture. me — 
But soon you'll be an ice cream sod-a hound Ther e's dr i nks w e can' pick. 




_^^ say-ing 'Gim-me some tea" 

—. — but not one with a kick 

Chorus, 



When Mis-ter Jan-u - a - ry comes 'a -.round. . 
When Mis-ter Jan-u - a - ry comes a- round.. 




Whoa Y Jan- u - a - ry, oh 
Whoa Jan - u - a - ry, oh 



TTT 



Jan - u - a - ry I. hate to . see you come 'roun 

Jan - u - a - ry I hate to see you come "round 



ounT-Jsfi! 




[u • ly was might - y tough 
;u - ly you made us think 



but we could get e - nough 
we could, n't get a drink 



n 



And if we knew the 
But when -we want • ed 




■■ i IT r FT 

-bar. man we.could get the reg.'lar stuff. But oh ' Jan - u - a - ry, whoa V Jan - u - a - ry 
lome-thing all we had to do was wink. But oh Jan ■ u • a • ry, whoa Jan - u - a ■ ry 




.I'm so sad I want to cry 
.So long good old rock and rye 



You're the month that's going to make my life a wreck— 
Mis . ter Be - to nev- er made a hit with m e 




I know I will turn uu-.to a hors-es neck 
Cause it has -n't got the right au-thor . 1 - ty 



Wf'f 

oa r Jan- u - a - ry when you go dry_ 
ia Jan-u - a ♦ ry when you go dry— 




__ You're going to be worse thanju - ly. 

_ You're going to be worse _ thanju - ly. 



Copyright MCJfXIX by Harry Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co., 222 W. 46* St., N.Y, 



Sing It. 

Lots of 

Extra 

Choruses. 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUB. CO., 222 West 46th Street, New York City 



BEN BORNSTEIN, General Manager 



MURRA.Y BLOOM, Prolesslonal; 



LONDON ' 
Darrw.KK Mu»ic Pub. Co. 



CHICAGO-ESTATE LAK.E BLDC. Suite 
; : EDDIE. LEWIS. Pro!. Mijr. 



{ BOSTON-rzo TREMONT 



PHILADELPHIA— KEITH THEATRE BLDC . 
Suite 70S— HARRY LlNKiUP^of- Mt' 



Copyrighted. 1919. ind pobUihed wddyby the CHppcr Coryovatiosfc 1604 Broadway. New York. Entered at the Pol Mjjj jj Wcw York, Jane 34, 187>. jj SaSSjdejiei man natter under Act of Hw», 1*7% 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1853 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 17, 1919 



VOLUME LXVU-No. » 
Price. Ten Cents, HOO a Yc»r 



ACTOR HELD IN 
CHICAGO 
MURDER 

POLICE SAY HE KNOWS MUCH 



Chicago, Sept. 15.— Believed by the 
police to know considerable about the mur- 
der of Mrs. Louisa Brown, widow of a 
clergyman, Thomas Palmer, a Los Angeles 
moving picture actor, was arrested here 
yesterday, and held at the May wood police 
headquarters for examination. 

In the arrest of Palmer by Detective 
Sergts. Folson and O'Brien, just as he 
was taking: a train for his home, the 
police believe that the mystery surround- 
ing the death, of Mrs. Brown, who they 
found murdered in her home last Thursday, 
has been cleared np. 

The most incriminating of the evidence, 
charged against Palmer by the police, con- 
cerns a quarrel he is reported to have had 
with the former minister's wife shortly be- 
fore she was slain.' 

Mrs. Brown, the police say sold Palmer 
and his father-in-law, a man named Stool, 
a pony. Neighbors state that the three 
engaged in a. quarrel over the payment of 
the price, $75, and that, last Sunday, three 
days prior ■ to the murder, the two men 
went to the Brown bungalow and re-opened 
the argument. r . 

This report, coupled with others to the 
effect that. Palmer's face and body were 
badly scratched, as though by a woman's 
fingernails, led to his arrest. The detec- 
tives who brought him to the Maywood 
jail asserted that he appeared extremely 
nervous. 

Mrs. Marie Palmer, his wife, also a 
former movie actress denied that her hus- 
band had anything to do with the murder 
of. Mrs.. Brown, declaring that she was 
with him all of Wednesday afternoon and 
Thursday night, the time, the police believe, 
daring while the murder was committed. 

Mrs. Palmer explained that five years 
ago she met her husband while married to 
another man, whose name she refused to 
tell, in Los Angeles. She was subsequently 
divorced and two years ago married Pal- 
mer. Both were in the movies at the time. 

The Palmers, she said, moved here last 
May, on' the death of her mother. Since 
that time, she admitted, Palmer has not 
been working. The Maywood police have 
refused to allow Palmer to be removed to 
a Chicago police station and further re- 
fuse to allow his attorney, Jacob B. Dit- 
tis, to see him. 

His wife, in explaining the marks on 
Palmer's face and. body, stated that he and 
■he had had an argument which finally 
reached the stage where she scratched him 
up herself. 



V MISSING GIRL WITH ACTOR 

Los Atioeles, . Sept. 15. — Clifford 
Mundy, a motion picture actor, twenty-two 
years of age, and who disappeared for a 
few' days last week, has been found, with 
-Irene- Smith,-. aged seventeen. The girl's 
parents, who .reside at' Santa Monica, no- 
tified detectives of the girl's diss ppear- 
_ she was Anally located at El 
MPT "-. ■ .:■::? '■ ■' ,-U!' "'! 



SELLING LOEW THEATRE STOCK 

Tobohto, Canada, Sept 15.— The Ox- 
ford Securities Corporation, of this city, 
is pushing a selling campaign of stock in 
Loew's Hamilton Theatre, Limited. 

The stock being sold is seven per cent 
cumulative preferred, par value $100, and 
the price asked per share is $87.50 net, 
at which price, it is said, the stock will 
yield an annual dividend of eight per 
cent. 

The theatre is already in operation, the 
annual net return being given as $150,000, 
which is six times the interest charged 
against the entire preference share issue 
of $350,000. A quarterly dividend of 1% 
per cent has been declared payable Oc- 
tober 15 to stockholders of record Sep- 
tember 30. 



WANTED TO STOP CIRCUS 

Kansas City, Sept 11. — The labor in- 
terests in this city succeeded in reviving 
an old "blue law," which forbade circuses 
showing on Labor Day, and attempted to 
enforce it against the Ringling Brothers 
and Barnum and Bailey Combined Shows, 
which played here then. The attempt was 
unsuccessful, for the management suc- 
ceeded in convincing the City Council of 
the futility of trying to prevent people 
from seeing what they wanted to see. The 
council was afraid that the Labor Day 
parade would be a failure should the circus 
be allowed to parade also. The Ringling 
people, however, cut oat the parade and the 
show was then allowed to go on, and so 
everything went along nicely. 

CIRCUS PERFORMER HAS FALL 

Baltzuoee, Sept 14 — Ernest Nevada, 
appearing at the Keystone Exhibition 
Show's- Circus, here, had a marrow escape 
last night,. when, in making a plunge from 
a platform fifty feet high, to a net he 
misjudged the distance. He struck the 
edge of the impetus, breaking the net 
breaking the guy ropes and causing him 
to fall to the ground, where he was shaken 
np considerably. He was, however, not 
injured seriously enough to prevent him 
from appearing at the next performance. 

UONS ESCAPE IN COLLISION 

Sacramento, CaL, Sept 12.— Del Rays 
Lions, appearing here this week, caused 
considerable excitement when, as they 
were being taken into the theatre, the 
truck they were on collided with an elec- 
tric car and .the doors of their cages were 
loosened. Three of the ""tiMs got away, 
but were recaptured later in the day in 
time for the performance. The incident 
caused many people to flock to the theatre 
to see the recaptured, beasts. 

"SCANDALS OF 1919" CLOSING 

George White's "Scandals of 1019" show 
win close at the Liberty Theatre a week 
from next Saturday and is scheduled to 
open at the Forrest Theatre, Philadelphia, 
the following Monday. 

At this time it has not been definitely 
decided whether "Hitchy-Koo" or some 
other musical show will follow it at the 
Liberty. 



N. V. A. TO MAKE 
BIG DRIVE FOR 

MEMBERS 

WANT ALL VAUDEVILLE TO JOIN 



With the object of inducing every vaude- 
ville artist who plays the standard circuits 
to become a member of the National Vaude- 
ville Artists, Henry Chesterfield, its secre- 
tary, is planning to launch a gigantic and 
active Membership Drive. It is estimated 
that a drive of three or four weeks' dura- 
tion would increase the membership of the 
N. Y. A. until it includes practically every 
variety performer in America. 

The drive will be carried on through a 
system of deputies. That is, in every thea- 
tre in the United States that plays vaude- 
ville, there will be one on the bill appointed 
to act as an N. V. A. deputy. It will be 
his doty to ascertain how many performers 
on the bill are members of the vaudeville 
organization and to show whatever per- 
formers are not members what advantages 
they would gain by joining. The deputy 
wiU be supplied with application blanks so 
that he may sign np his converts. 

The deputy will also be furnished with a 
delinquent dues list and will be empowered 
to approach delinquent members and col- 
lect the amounts owed. 

The drive will probably last three weeks 
or a month and will be started as soon as 
the necessary data and campaign literature 
has been printed and the vaudeviUe bills 
have been "deputized." The appointment 
of deputies is an easy matter on the 
Pantages time, where the shows travel 
"en masse," and, in a smaller degree, is 
also easy on the Orpheum time, for the 
same reason. But on the other circuits, 
where each act travels individually and 
where the make-up of bills constantly 
changes, the system of appointing deputies 
is considerably more complicated, but la 
now being worked ont 

Chesterfield states that this drive will 
also be of great statistical value to the 
N. V. A., for the deputies will be required 
to submit regular reports concerning 'the 
result of their activities. 



CARROLL-GRAY PIECE OFF 

Cohan and Harris have decided not to 
produce "Jim's Girl," written by Earl 
Carroll and Thomas Gray, on Broadway, 
but have released the piece for stock. It 
was originally intended for Broadway, bat 
owing to its similarity to "The Five Mil- 
lion" this plan was caned off. 



GO IN TO "SCANDALS OF 1919" 
A new team, Moran and Mack, replaced 

Bennett and Richards In George White's 
"Scandals" at the Liberty last night 



Price Is Raised 

Commencing with the issue of September 24th the Clipper 
,; iwill^be 15 cents per copy; | 



••i:<; 



W 



FLIRTING WITH DEMPSEY SHOW 
An effort was being made early this 
week to get some Broadway bankrolls, in- 
eluding that of Larry Weber, interested is 
a rehabilitation of the Jack Dempsey show 
which, after playing in Philadelphia last 
week, closed. The chances, however, did 
not appear to be very bright 

Many of the persona with the show main- 
tain that little can be done with the propo- 
sition unless Dempsey can be induced to 
accept a lower salary than $7,500 per week, 
the figure he was drawing, and which was 
a big handicap. If he could be brought to 
look upon a cut in salary with favor, the 
show might have a chance to make some 
money, they say. The idea of interesting 
Weber in the proposition was to bring the 
show into New York and open at Madison 
Square Garden. 



WASHINGTON TO HAVE OPERA CO. 

Washington, D. O., Sept 15. — Wash- 
ington, not to be outdistanced by any of 
the leading cities of the country, has de- 
cided to have its own opera company, and, 
accordingly, Bolln Bond, who last season 
conducted the Community Opera Company, 
composed of Washington singers who bad 
made good in English opera, has organ- 
ized The Peoples National Opera Society, 
promised to be a permanent Washington 
institution. The company will present a 
number of first class productions for one 
week each at each of the local theatres- 
It is planned to build an opera house by 
popular subscription where opera and 
kindred arte may be properly presented. 



ZUKOR GOING TO LONDON 

Adolph Zuker, head of . the Famous 
Play ere- Lanky Corporation,, is scheduled 
to sail for England early next month. The 
chief object of bis trip is to rehabilitate 
some of the interests acquired by P. P. L. 
during the last few years. It is rumored 
that shortly after Zukor's return to this 
country: some time in November, negotia- 
tions which .are not pending will have been 
consummated, as a result of which the 
Selznick Company will be merged with the 
Famous Puyers-Laaky Corporation. 



COBURNS PLAN MUSICAL SHOW 
Mr. and Mrs. Cobnro. it was learned 
last week, have practically completed nego- 
tiations for a new musical play which they 
plan to produce. The play la. called "The 
Three Showers," and the book, lyrics and 
music were written Jointly by Harry S. 
Creamer and Turner Layton. 

If George M. Cohan consents to fix up 
the book of "The Three Showers," aa la 
contemplated by the Ooburna, the piece 
win be produced very shortly. 

SUSPENDED FROM FLOOR 

Mandel. and Boas were, suspended from 
the floor of the Loew booking office last 
week for a period of thirty days, because 
of a breach In booking courtesy. There 
wsa a complaint regarding their tsssdlMS 
of an act and, in order to Impress the im- 
portance of discipline In' the fcoeMng office. 
they were suspended. 



JORDAN RETURNS FROM LONDON 

Walter Jordan, of Sanger. and Jordan, 
returned last Saturday on. the AfmHrnnU. 
from London, where he spent eight weeks' 
looking over the theatrical sttssjtthw and 
acquiring the American b rokaiag a rights 
to current dramatic productions; it 



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THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



INFLUX OF NEW PRODUCTIONS 
SLATED F OR LOCA L THEATRES 

Theatrical Season, Retarded by Strike, Is Confronted with a Task 
of Closing Old Shows to Make Way for Large Number 

of Premieres. 



Many new plays are headed for Broad- 
way and will be given their inJHwl show- 
ing within the next few weeks. This in- 
flux of new productions Is. due both to 
the fact that the strike retarded the sea- 
son and held up a number of shows about 
to open, and to the fact also that many 
ploys which hare been revived since the- 
atrical peace has been restored were about 
to close their doors when the striae was 
called. 

Next Wednesday, "See Saw," by Earl 
Derr Biggers and Louis A. Hirsch will 
open at the Cohan Theatre. Henry Savage 
is presenting this musical comedy, which 
has been playing in Boston to around 
$11,000 per week. 

WincheU Sjnith and John L. Golden 
will also present a comedy, Thunder," on 
Monday, at the Criterion Theatre. The 
play is written about the folk of the Blue 
Kidge Mountains and was first tried out 
under the title of "Sunrise." The scenery 
and accessories of the production are being 
designed and made under the direction of 
Livingston Piatt and Harold Douglas. In 
the cast will be Burr Mcintosh, Benja- 
min Kauser, Marie Day, Horace James, 
Liela Bennett, Charles Althoff, Eva Denni- 
son, Sam Reed, Blanche Talbert Mart 
Heisey, Clarice McDonald, William Bay, 
Gay Nichols and John Talbert. 

"An Exchange of Wives," by Cosmo 
Hamilton, will be presented by Walter 
Hast at the Bijou Theatre on Monday 
also. The cast includes Lee Baker, For- 
rest Winant Chrygtal Heme and Mar- 
garet Dale. On the same evening the 
Shuberts will present The Dancer" at 
the Harris Theatre, with Isabelle Lowe, 
John Holiday, Effingham Pinto and Jose 
Ruban. 

"First Is Last," the play by Samuel 
Shipman and Percival Wilde, will open 
on Sept. 17, at the Maxine Elliot Theatre. 
Phoebe Foster, Franklyn Ardell, Robert 
Strange, Edward Dix, Kathleen Comegys, 
Edward Robinson, Mary Newcombe, Elise 
Bartlett and James Kearney will be seen 
in tits cast. 



A new Booth Tarkington comedy called 
"Clarence" will be presented by George 
Trier at the Hudson Theatre on Satur- 
day, Sept 20. Alfred Lunt will play the 
title role. Helen Hayes, Mary Boland, 
Susanne Westford, Bea Martin, John 
Flood, Glenn Hunter, Willsxd Bartson and 
Barlowe Borland are also prominent in 
the cast. The story revolves around" the 
post war adventures of a young man. 

"Moonlight and Honeysuckle" is the title 
of a comedy by George Scarborough that 
opens at the Henry Miller Theatre on 
September 29th. Ruth Chatterton will be 
starred in the attraction. It has played 
a Spring engagement under the title of 
'*The Merrie Month of May. 

"Oliver Morosco* s second contribution to 
the season's offerings will be Anna Nichol's 
new comedy, "Seven Mjles to Arden," 
which is now in rehearsal. It is being 
rushed to go into the Little Theatre. 

"Just a Minute," a John Oort show 
which opened in Baltimore on Monday 
night last will have a Broadway pre- 
miere next Monday night at the Knicker- 
bocker Theatre. Letty Torke and Jack 
Boyle are among those featured in the 
cast 

G. M. Anderson's "Frivolities of 1919" 
will start to frivol on Broadway early in 
October, although the theatre for its pro- 
duction has not as yet been chosen. Fea- 
tured in the cast are Nan Halperin, Felix 
Adler and Clark and McCuIlough. 

David Belaseo's production, "The Gold 
Diggers," which opens at Long Branch 
on Friday, will play the week of Septem- 
ber 22nd in Washington, D. C. On Sep- 
tember 30th it will have its Broadway 
premiere at the Lyceum. The play fea- 
tures Ina Claire. She is supported by 
Bruce McBae, R. Reeves-Smith, Frederick 
TruesdeR, Horace Braham, Austen Harri- 
son, Harold Christy, D. Lewis Clinton, 
Frank Lewis, Jobyna Rowland, Beverly 
West Louise GaUawoy, Ruth Terry, Paul- 
ine HaU, Ldlyan Taabman, LueRa Gear, 
Gladys Feldman, Katherine Walsh and 
Louise Burton. 



MOROSCO PROVIDES FOR WIFE 

Los Angeles, Sept 13. — It is rumored 
here that Oliver Morosco recently settled 
upon his wife the income from all of his 
western coast properties, which, it is 
stated, amounts close to $75,000. This 
action, it is said, was taken by Morosco 
when he found that he and his wife no 
longer agreed. 

Mrs. Morosco, in her complaint wherein 
she states that her correct name is Mrs. 
Anne T. Mitchell, says that she married 
Oliver Morosco Mitchell, better known 
as Oliver Morosco, when he was treasurer 
of the Grand Opera House, San Fran- 
cisco, in 1887. It was not until August 
13th of this year that Mrs. Morosco dis- 
covered, the complaint states, that Mor- 
osco had been guilty of misconduct with 
Selma Paley for some time. 



COURT PROTECTS FILM 

San Francisco, Sept 13. — William G. 
Smeltzer, manager of the Savoy Theatre, 
where the picture, The End of the World, 
is being shown, secured a temporary order 
restraining the chief of police. White, 
from stopping the showing of the film. He 
claims the play is not immoral. The thea- 
tre is now playing to packed houses. 



DUMONTS MINSTRELS REOPEN 

• pmrr.An»T.T»wTA , Sept 15. — Dumont and 
Emmet Welch's Minstrels opened their sea- 
son here Saturday evening, playing to a 
capacity audience. 

Welch, upon taking his place as inter- 
locutor, introduced each member of the 
half circle, who was greeted with welcom- 
ing applause. The first part had for its 
members Eddy Cassidy, Charley Boyden, 
John Lemules, Bennie Franklin, Richard 
Lee, Alf. H. Gibson, James Ward and 
others, together with Richard Lilly and his 
orchestra. 

Sheldon and Patterson appeared in My 
Son Pat an Irish comedy : Bennie Frank- 
lin, assisted by Jimmie Ward, had a skit 
entitled. Atop of the Walton' with songs 
and comedy; Charlie Boyden and Richard 
Lee, in Charlie's Birthday, and Eddie 
Cassady, in new songs and talk, scored a 
hit 



DICKER FOR THEATRE SITE 

Max and Lamer are negotiating for a 
Jersey City site on which, they plan to 
build a tfteatre of the most modern type 
and comparable "with the best in New 
York's metropolitan district The site is 
near Journal Square. 



PATCH ACQUIRES MUSICAL PLAY 

William Moore Patch has acquired, 
through Sanger and Jordan, the musical- 
ixed version of Augustus McHugh's farce, 
"If s Dp to You," which- he plans to pro- 
duce some time next month. Edward 
Paulton is responsible for the book and 
lyrics of the piece and the late Manuel 
Klein composed the score, this being the 
last he wrote before his death. 



SUED OVER COMMISSIONS 

Daniel Mayer, international manager 
and booking agent is seeking to recover 
$2,452 through a suit he has brought 
against Sybil Vane, the little English 
singing comedienne, who is appearing in 
vaudeville in this country at present 

Mayer claims that during the last few 
years, as Miss Vane's manager, he ad- 
vanced her various sums aggregating 
$3,000 and that she has paid back but 
$547.50, leaving a balance of the amount 
alleged to be due. 

In her answer, which Leon L bb H , her 
attorney, has prepared, but has not yet 
filed, Miss Vane not only denies that she 
is indebted to Mayer, but she also claims 
that Mayer is indebted to her in a sum 
of money not mentioned, for alleged breach 
of contract. She sets forth that in No- 
vember, 1915, in London, she entered into 
a contract with Mayer, under the terms 
of which she was to appear under his 
exclusive management in concert and 
vaudeville engagements for six years and 
that he guaranteed her a minim nm salary 
of $50 weekly as long. as the contract ran. 
The arrangement she claims, also stipu- 
lated Mayer was to receive twenty-five per 
cent of her yearly earnings up to $12,500; 
thirty per cent of the next $5,000, forty 
per cent of the next $7,500 and fifty per 
cent of all amounts above $25,000 that she 
earned in any one year. She Bays Mayer 
was also to pay all her traveling and pub- 
licity expenses. 

Miss Vane arrived in this country De- 
cember 3, 1915 and she claims that Mayer 
failed to obtain an engagement for her 
until February of the following year when 
she worked two weeks with the Russian 
Ballet previous to which she had given 
a recital. 

During the two years that followed her 
engagement with the Russian Ballet here, 
she says that she scarcely worked and, 
as a result became poverty stricken and 
had to fall back on her music teacher and 
friends in Tonkers for funds, the latter of 
whom maintained her for nearly eight 
months. 

Finally, she says, her poverty stricken 
condition became so acute that she went 
to Mayer and begged him to find employ- 
ment for her and help her out He agreed 
if she would sign a new agreement in 
which it was set forth that she was in- 
debted to Mayer in the sum of $3,000, she 

claims. ■ 

She signed the agreement and, in Janu- 
ary, 1918, Mayer obtained an ■engagement 
for her in the "Cheer Dp" show at the 
Hippodrome. The engagement lasted eight 
weeks and her salary was $200 a week; 
but she claims that Mayer deducted 50 
per cent of this sum weekly as his man- 
agerial "bit" and, in addition, deducted 
10 per cent as commission for obtaining 
the engagement 

Following the Hippodrome engagement 
she says that Mayer failed to obtain em- 
ployment for her again. However, in June, 
1918, she managed to find employment in 
Philadelphia at $50 a week. Last Winter, 
she appeared for one week in "Half Past 
Eight" the musical show produced by 
Edward Perkins in Syracuse and which 
never got beyond that town, Perkins 
. closing the show after five days. 

Recently, Judge Lydon, sitting in Spe- 
cial Term for Motions, in the Supreme 
Court granted a motion made by Laski, 
Miss Vane's attorney, requiring Mayer, be- 
cause of his being a non-resident to de- 
posit a $250 bond for costs in the action. 



JACK MORRIS HAS A PLAY 

Jack Morris, of the Shubert offices, is 
to produce "Dili," a new musical comedy 
by the writers of Take It From Me," Will 
B. Johnstone and Will R. Anderson. 



ACTRESS GETS ESTATE 

Dorothy Parker, in "The Woman in 
Room 13," is- the heir to an estate of $250- 
000 which she inherited from her husband, 
the late Bobby Fennell, killed in France. 
Robert C. Moore, her attorney, is going 
over the papers and attending to the legal 
end of the estate, of which she is admin- 
istratrix. 

"OH LADY, LADY" OPENS 

Kingston, N. Y., Sept 13. — "Oh Lady, 
Lady" is scheduled to open here Monday, 
at which time it starts a tour that will 
probably take it all the way to the Coast 
After playing a few New York State 
stands it will play a week stand in Cin- 
cinnati. It is a Comatock and Gest pro- 
duction. 



DREW POST GETTING SET 

Now that' its charter has been granted, 
the S. B«nlriii Drew Post of the American 
Legion, is ready to organize itself on a 
permanent basis, and, with that end in 
view, a nominating committee will be 
appointed at the post's meeting on next 
Friday night to nominate permanent of- 
ficers to replace the present temporary 
ones. 

Until such - a time as permanent com- 
mittees are appointed, Post Commander 
Wells Hawks has named the following 
committees: 

Ways and Means — William H. Cook, 
Norman L. Sper, Arthur Ungar, Ray 
Brown, John S. Hubbard and W. R. Les- 
ser. 

Promotion and Publicity — A. P. Wax- 
man, Howard J. Green, George S. Cook, 
Lieut. H. W. Miller and Fred Cronae. 

Constitution — James Loughborough, L. 
B O'Sbaughnessy, A. P. Waxman, Charles 
Reed Jones, George Worden Wood, Arthur 
Rankin and B. P. Fineman. 

Headquarters — Otto Henkel, W. R. Les- 
ser and W. G. Newman. 

Entertainment — Eugene L. Kelly, W. G. 
Newman, J. Archer Curtis, Lawrence 
Schuber, J. B. McKowen, Lawrence 
Schwab and Floyd W. Stoker. 



MARIE TEMPEST TOURING AFRICA 

JOHAITOESBUBG, So. Africa, Sept. 13. — 
Marie Tempest the famous English 
actress, who has just completed a four 
season run, making a new record for this 
part of the world, is to tour India and 
The Far East according to plans now 
being put into operation. The tour will 
include a season at each of the following 
theatres, the seasons not being of any 
definite length : Durban, Cape Town, 
Bombay, Calcutta, Rangoon, Penang, 
Singapore, Ipho, Kalalnmpnr, Hong Kong, 
Peking, Teistan, Shanghai, Manila, Kobe, 
Tokyo and Yokahama. After this tour is 
completed, the campany will visit America. 

In association with Miss Tempest is 
Graham Browne and a company of world 
toured artists, with a repertoire of fifteen 
comedies, furnishings and scenery. The 
company is under the personal manage- 
ment of Wilfred Cotton, who is acting as 
representative of The African Theatres, 
Ltd, India Films, Ltd., Middle East 
Films, Ltd., and the London Management 
of Miss Tempest So far, the tour of the 
company has been a success, financially 
and artistically. 



PRE-CATALAN REVUE OPENS 

The new Pre-Catalan Revue opened last 
night, Sept. 16, it being preesnted by Lee 
Herrick. The music and lyrics of the pro- 
duction were written in part by F. 
Vaughn and partly taken from a number 
of shows and popular songs. 

The cast of principals contains : Vienne 
Webb, who formerly appeared in "Have a 
Heart," prima donna; Garrett Carroll, 
juvenile; Margaret Baron and Vera Dela- 
tour, soubrettes; and the Homer Sisters 
who have appeared in vaudeville. 



GETS $40,000 IN THREE WEEKS 

Saw Francisco, Sept 14. — ''Broken 
Blossoms," the D. W. Griffith special, set 
a record for receipts in a motion-picture 
theatre here in a three weeks' stand. The 
film has done close to $40,000, with two 
shows daily and $1.50 top admission price. 

Guy Bates Post will open here in "The 
Masquerader" on Sept 15, for a three 
weeks' stand with $2.50 top and $3.00 for 
boxes. 



START CHILDREN'S THEATRE 

Saw Francisco, Cat, Sept 12. — A 
Children's Theatre, designated as the Cat 
and Fiddle Players of San Francisco, is 
being organized. The work presented is to 
be of an original nature. Fairy plays, 
operettas and pantomimes are to be given. 
During the whiter they are planning to 
present several plays formerly played by 
the Greenleaf Theatre, New York. 



ACQUIRES VIRGINIA THEATRE 

Suffolk, Vs_ Sept 13.— The Academy 
of Music, recently remodeled at the ex 

§ense - of • the city, has been rented by 
'.. C Ererhart, who win book road shows 
there this season. ' 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



CUBAN CIRCUSES ATTRACTING 
HUNDREDS OF AM ERICAN ACTS 

Richard Pitrot and Other Agents Sending Many Turns to 

Havana and Other Cities for the Winter— Like 

American Offerings There 



More than 150 American acrobatic acts 
are scheduled to sail for Cuba within the 
next fonr weeks to enter upon Havana . 
circus engagement extending from the 
latter part of October to the middle of 
next May. This became known late last 
week when a quartette of booking agents 
here who book American acts for Cuban 
theatrical enterprises engaged passage on 
Ward line steamers for the acts they are 
sending over. Chief among those . making 
the greatest number of passage reserva- 
tions was Richard Pitrot, who arranged 
for forty-five performers to sail 

Pitrot, last week, arranged to send over 
ten American acts for the Pnbillonea Cir- 
cus, in Havana, housed in the largest 
theatre In Cuba's capital. The acts, after 
playing there for six weeks, will begin a 
tour of the Island extending until next 
May. The acta scheduled to sail are: 
FiHis Family, Four Roeders, The Casinos, 
The Jardys, De Phils, Charles Siegrist 
Troupe, H. C. Mcttttyre and wife, Peter 
Taylor's lions, The Flying Codonas and 
the Baliot Trio. 

Other agents have booked passage on 
later steamers for some of the acts they 
are sending dawn to Cuba, bnt within the 
next ten days no. less than twenty-four 



acts will sail for the Island. 

It ia expected that the coming theatrical 
season in Cuba will prove to be even more 
successful than was last season. 

Incidentally, it may be mentioned that 
performers, especially circus performers, 
do not have to work as many performances 
each week in Cuba as they do In this 
country, for there are few if any matinee 
performances given in Cuban theatres, ex- 
cept in Havana on Saturdays only. The 
theatres outside, though, almost without 
exception, have no matinee days scheduled. 

Then too, the custom prevails down 
there of giving but one performance each 
day, and that one in the evening, instead 
of the two-a-day program that prevails in 
this country. 

There Is also another reason why 
American performers like Cuban engage- 
ments. This is because, in addition to 
receiving more money, or at least as much 
as they received here, all of their travel- 
ills' expenses are paid, besides. And, when 
it is considered that the cost of living ia 
much cheaper in Cuba than it is, at pres- 
ent, in this country, it is quite reasonable 
to suppose that performers expect to save 
and bring back some money from their 
Cuban engagements. 



SUES HAVANA CIRCUS 

Adelaide Sutton, who books and man- 
ages American acts in Cuba and South 
American countries, is suing Pablo Santos 
and Jesus Artigas, owners of the Santos 
and Artigaa Circus, in Havana, in the 
City Court, here. 

In her complaint, filed by Kotzen 
Brothers, her attorneys, she alleges that 
the circus people owe her $1,870 for al- 
leged breach of a contract she made with 
them in November, 1016. Under the terms 
of the alleged contract, Santos and 
Artigas booked two acts from Miss Sut- 
ton. The Van Dieman Troupe and the 
Tasmanian Troupe, consisting of six peo- 
ple, who appeared in both acta. They 
were to appear in Havana for ten weeks 
at a joint weekly salary of $360. 

She further alleges that, after appear- 
ing in the defendants' Havana circus for 
a period of five weeks, the acta were 
canceled and, in addition, Santos and 
Artigas failed to pay the sum of $120 
which, she claims, is due the acts for 
traveling expenses. 

Leon Laski represents Santos and 
Artigaa, and he declared the acts were 
booked by his clients with the understand- 
ing that they were acrobatic acts, when, 
as a matter of fact, they are singing acts, 
he says. 



FILE CLAIMS AGAINST PATCH 

Several suits have been filed in the 
Third District Municipal Court here 
against William Moore Patch, Pittsburgh 
producer and theatre manager. 

Charles J. Maher, a printer, as assignee 
of the National Printing and Engraving 
Company, has brought two suits against 
Patch in which a total of $432.20 is 
claimed for printing matter sold to the 
Fort Pitt Annex Company, controlled by 
Patch. The printing matter was sold 
during March, 1918, and was used in con- 
nection with the play "The Man Who 
Stayed at Home." 

Phil P. Benedict, the engraver, has filed' 
a suit against Patch, claiming $288.46, for 
work alleged to have been done in con- 
nection with the play "The Man Who 
Stayed at Home." 

Phil P. Benedict, the engraver, has filed 
a suit against Patch, claiming $288.46 for 
work alleged to have been done in con- 
nection with "The Man Who Stayed at 
Home" from July to November, 1918. 

The White Studio, photographers, filed 
a suit against Patch claiming that he 
owed it $55. This suit was settled last 
week. 

Leon Laski represented the plaintiffs in 
the various suits. 



NEW HOPWOOD FARCE COMING 

"I'll Say Sh Does," Avery Hopwood's 
three-act farce, which was produced in 
stock in Washington hist season, is being 
prepared for presentation as a regular pro- 
duction here this coming season by 
George P. Marshall. The farce will be 
placed in rehearsal next week and ia 
scheduled to open out of town some time 
in October, with Lynn Overman the fea- 
tured player in the cast. 

STAGE HAND LEFT $3,211 
William Henry Harris, who at one time 
was employed as a .stage hand at the old 
Brooklyn and Park Theatres, the Star 
Theatre and the old Academy of Music, 
during the period when Colonel John 
Holmes was manager, left an estate valued 
at $3,211, when he died recently, intestate, 
at his home, 386 McDonough. street, Brook- 
lyn, according to an appraisal of his prop- 
erty made by a Transfer Tax State ap- 
praiser, filed in the Kings County Sur- 
rogate's Court yesterday. 



"SINBAD" REOPENS IN PHJLLY 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12. — The re- 
cent Winter Garden success, "Sinbad," 
with Al Jolsen in the stellar part, re- 
opened the Sam S. Shubert Theatre here 
last night. In the cast were, Jack Laogh- 
lin, Harry Kearley, Leah Nora, Fritzi Von 
Busing, Lawrence D'Orsay, Ernest Hare, 
Sue Creighton, Virginia Smith, Helen 
Eley, Franklyn A. Batie, Forrest Huff, 
Irene and Constance Farber. 



GETTING THE COIN 

WORCESTER, Mass., Sept 14. — A. H. 
Wood's "Parlor, Bedroom and Bath" made 
a good record here this week, for, after 
opening at $182, it picked up nightly until, 
on Saturday, it had done a gross of slightly 
over $6,000. 



EARL CARROL GOING UP AGAIN 

Earl Carrol will shortly move into his 
bungalow atop the Godfrey Building, again, 
where he lived before going to war. While 
he was away, it has been occupied by 
Marion Davies, the film star. 



MERCEDES SHOW OPENS 

Toledo, O., Sept 1L— The Mercedes 
Show, known as "Miracles of To-day," 
opened at- the Auditorium Theatre here 
this week. The show, headed by Mercedes, 
is an aggregation of vaudeville acta, with 
the magic and mysterious, predominating. 

Mercedes, assisted by Mile. Stantone, 
does his regular vaudeville act Princess 
Wah Let ka gives an exhibition of mind- 
reading by answering questions written 
on slips of paper, and also tells the 
thought of the writer of the question, in 
addition to predicting the future. 

George Beuschling, magician, doea a 
number of oriental conjurer stunts, slight 
o'hand tricks and feats that rival the beat 
of disappearing acts. 

Howard Martelle, a ventriloquist, "La 
Follette," who does a number of quick 
change feats and, "Bibleland," in which 
a pretty girl floats over the audience, ap- 
parently supported only by a. cumber of 
gigantic bubbles, are ilso included in 
the program. 

"The Pearl of Persia," a spectacular 
offering in which a variety of specialties 
are offered, makes a pleasing finale. In 
this, Mercedes, himself, adda a little bur- 
lesque to the program by giving a travesty 
on a number of famous composers, with a 
travesty band. 

The production is elaborately staged and 
at the opening performance was received 
with great enthusiasm. 



NEW SHOW OPENS ON COAST 

Los Angeles, Cat, Sept 15. — "The 
Victims," a new play which opened at the 
Mason Opera House here last week, with 
David Gaily, who, together with Mary 
Lambert, wrote the play, in the leading 
role, is a clever satire. 

The production has three acts, an epi- 
logue and a prologue, and deals with the 
inconsistencies of society. There are 
twenty-three in the cast and all have been 
selected from local talent Mr. and Mrs. 
David Gaily play the leads, while J. Jack- 
son Dunn, recently a member of the Ab- 
bey Players, of Dublin, plays one of the 
heavies. Scott McKee has the role of a 
crook in the production, which also has' 
another bad man in Fred Pierce. Pierce 
does a New York Bowery tough. Ger- 
trude Short is an attractive ingenue. 

Others in the cast are Walter Emerson, 
Dwight Crittenton, Vernol Park, vampire, 
Frank Whitsen, Edgar Mason, Elsa Lori- 
mer. In addition to the twenty-three 
principals, there are six Denishawn dan- 
cers, directed by Ted Shawn. 



HELD IN MURDER CASE 

Bridgeport, Conn., Sept 15. — Doris 
Kline, alias Eva Erickson, a cabaret 
singer who has been appearing at the 
Brooklawn Villa Club, waa arrested last 
week in connection with the Binkowitz 
murder case. Binkowitz is the Wall Street 
messenger that is supposed to have stolen 
$188,000 in liberty bonds and disappeared. 
His body was found near Milford. .' 

Miss Kline is not accused of the mur- 
der, but it is said she and Binkowitz were 
friends and that she knows more of the 
real murderers than she is willing to tell. 
The police are holding her without ball 
until she either telle what she knows or 
till they find evidence of the murderers. 



COAST SHOW CLOSING 

Los Angeles, CaL, Sept 14. — "Civilian 
Clothes," the sensational Morosco play 
which was originally to have played only 
one week here, but owing to popular de- 
mand has been showing for eleven, is 
scheduled to close here to-morrow night 
The chief roles in the play are being acted 
by Eleanor Woodruff and Clyde Fillmore. 



"OH, MT DEAR" LEAVING BOSTON 

Boston, Mags., Sept 16.— This ia the 
last week of "Oh My Dear," the popular 
musical comedy which has been playing 
here for the hut ten weeks at the Wilbur 
Theatre. 



"WHATS THE ODDS" GOES OVER 

Baltimore, Md., Sept. 11.— For those 
who like pretty dancing, and lots of it 
Eay songs and plenty of them, and dash- 
ing costumes with not too much of them, 
"What's The Odds," produced by Sam 
Shannon, of New York, is going to be a 
bit for it waa such here to-night when 
given its premiere performance at the 
Academy of Music 

This new musical comedy was written 
by Edgar Allan Woolf, from the old com- 
edy success "Checkers," with music by 
Albert Von Tilzer. The music is better 
than the book, and the work of producing 
better than either, for, "Whafa The Odds" 
is a well set-up production and also a well 
finished product having few marks of the 
first night except its freshness and criap- 
ness. It might, best be described as an all 
round production, for it does not empha- 
size stars, features nor comedy, but rather 
combines good settings, costumes, pretty 
songs, happy dances and an all around 
cast including Marion Sunshine, a charm- 
ing dancer named Sldonie Espere, and 
Mabel Withee, who both have clear, pretty 
voices, and a popular comedian, George 
McKay. The latter would talk to the 
audience, which is certainly not good taste 
off the vaudeville stage, but the audience, 
it must be admitted, enjoyed it hugely. 

Those in the cast include, Sidonle Espero, 
William Fitzsimmons, Renee Biano, George 
Sweet, Margaret Morris, Phoebe Hart 
King, Thomas Meehan, Marie Duchette, 
Elinor English, Helyn Eby, Carolyn Erwin, 
Marcelle Barnes, Charlotte Cushman, Petta 
Ramirez, Frances Mink and Florence Nor- 
man. 



NEWARK BILLPOSTERS STRIKE 

Newark, N. J., Sept 14.— The Bill 
Posters' Union, Local No. 18. is on strike 
against the Newark Poster Advertising 
Company and eighteen bill posters walked 
out after the demands of the striken had 
been refused. 

What the strikers demand is a forty- 
four instead of a forty-eight bonr week 
and an increase in wagea from $28 and 
$28 per week to $36 and $38 per week, 
as well as a recognition of their nnion. 

"They can all consider themselves oat 
of a job," declared John Dreyfnss, a mem- 
ber of the firm, "and, as far as we are 
concerned, there is no strike, for we'll get 
other men on the job in short order. We 
didn't have any nnion agreement so why 
should we recognise these fellows" 

When be waa reminded that a bill 
poster worker must be a resident of New- 
ark six months before he can obtain • 
license for that work, he simply replied, 
"that doesn't matter." 



UNION RAPS ART PATRONS 

Chicago, 111., Sept 15. — A threat has 
been mad> by Joseph E. Winkler, president 
of the local branch of the American 
Federation of Musicians, that nnleaa sVtsJw 
Hand and his orchestra are paid for their 
twelve days of service with the All Ameri- 
can Exposition, which turned ont to be a 
financial flivver, action would be taken, 
that would mean the prohibiting of the ap- 
pearance of any union musicians for 
organizations in which any of the following 
are interested: Gov. Lowden, Julias 
Rownwald, J. Ogden Armour, Major 
General Wood, Rear Admiral BaaaeU, Ed- 
ward F. Swift and many others. 

The aforementioned parties are sponsors 
for the exposition, and the stand taken by 
the union is that they are morally re- 
sponsible for the keeping of promises. 

Winkler baa stated that unless the men 
are paid for their services with the ex- 
position, this measure will be taken, and 
should it be, it might mean the closing up 
of the Opera Company and Symphony 
Orchestra, both of which are sponsored by 
the people mentioned. 



SHERMAN * DE FOREST SIGN 
Sherman and De Forest have signed 
with Marty Sampler's "Hitchy Koo" com- 
pany which opens at Red Bank, N. J., on 
September 29th. 



NEWSPAPER STRIKE HURTS 

Tacoma, Wash., Sept 15. — The print- 
ers' strike, which tied np all new s papers 
here last week has made >t impossible for 
amusements to advertise, and aa a result 
hit the show business here. 'The seal*, 
which has hitherto been ST for day work 
and $7-50 for night work, will, if the 
printers, win;' be $925 for- day work and 
$10 for night work. 



TftE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



P. M. A. LAYS DOWN THE LAW 
TO MEMBE RS WHO BALK EQUITY 

Coburn and Other Mangers Are Told They Mint Obey Spirit of 

the Term*; Most of die Individual Cases in Dispute 

Have Been Settled 



Charles Coburn, along with several 
other managers who seemed reluctant to 
obey the terms of the actors' strike settle- 
ment in its whole spirit, were called to 
task by Marc Klaw last week, presiding 
at ft meeting of the Producing Managers' 
Association. Klaw laid down the law on 
the subject and said that it was incum- 
bent upon the managers to lire np to the 
spirit of the agreement, jnst as it had been 
Intended when the' terms ending the strike 
were signed. 

Others, who, it is said, were raked over 
the coals at this meeting, were Sam For- 
rest, general stage manager for Cohan and 
Harris, and J. J. Shubert 

The fight between Coburn and the 
Equity was very bitter, and, after the 
trouble, Coburn had declared, it is said, 
that in "The Better 'Ole," he was only 
going to engage those "whose absence 
would embarrass" him. At first, it is 
reported, he suited his action to his words, 
but, after hearing the opinion of the other 
managers at the P. M. A. meeting followed 
by a conference early this week between 
Coburn and Frank Gihnore, executive sec- 
retary of the Equity, it was stated that 
"the trouble had been settled" and that 
"Coburn now understood and was ready 
to- live up to the spirit of the new con- 
tract." 

Coburn was a member of the Equity 
before the strike and had served on its 
Executive Council. 

The trouble with J. J. Shubert arose 
over differences between him and the 
Equity regarding the reinstatement of 
some of the chorus to their old jobs- But 
the difficulty ended after the law was laid 
down at the P. M. A. meeting. 

Several Equity members took exception 
to some of the remarks and actions of 
Sam Forrest when they returned for work, 
and for this reason he is supposed to have 
been singled ont for a tongue-whipping at 
the manager's meeting. 



On Monday, Equity members who had 
been reinstated to their former positions 
numbered approximately 2,300. There are 
still 30 cases in dispute. These are being 
settled by the managers in conjunction 
with the adjustment department of the 
Equity, of which George Trimbell is the 
head. 

In some cases where the managers have 
not chosen to replace actors in their for- 
mer roles, the actor has agreed to take 
two weeks' salary and an equally satis- 
factory engagement within thirty days. In 
other cases, the actor has been satisfied 
with a definite cash settlement. 

The managers also experienced diffi- 
culties in several cases where striking 
actors had taken motion picture engage- 
ments, and, at the end of the strike, were 
not available to go back to their old work. 

With the end of the strike, business 
relations between Ed. Wynn and the Shu- 
berts wen severed. The persistent rumor 
along the street was that the Shuberts 
were very bitter against Wynn and did 
not wish to take him back, and, at any 
rate, it is known that the Shuberts said 
they would not reinstate him in the 
"Gaieties" but would put him in some 
other attraction instead, which was in com- 
pliance with the terms of the strike set- 
tlement. Wynn stated that he preferred 
a cash settlement and a release, which was 
granted, and be is now a free lance. It 
is reported that he intends taking out his 
own show in the near future. 

The strike headquarters at Marten's 
Restaurant on Forty-fifth street have been 
abandoned by the Equity, and the few 
strike committees, such as the Readjust- 
ment Committee, that still have work to 
do have established offices at 113 West 
Forty-fifth street, which is Equity Chorus 
headquarters. 

The Equity Entertainment office on 
West Forty-eighth street is winding up 
its affairs and will Boon shut down. 



"FIDO" BENEFIT PLANNED 

The Actors* Fidelity League benefit has 
been postponed until Sunday evening, Oc- 
tober 12th. Originally, the benefit was 
scheduled for Sunday evening, September 
28th. 

The reason given for the postponement 
Is that it is impossible to give so elaborate 
a benefit as that planned at a date as 
early as the 28th. George Cohan stated 
that when the program is finally com- 
pleted it will contain the stariest list of 
stara that ever performed together at a 
single performance in any theatre. here. 
By postponing the date, Cohan said, the 
benefit will be even greater than originally 
contemplated and he promises that it will 
run away from the stilted formula of ben- 
efits to which the public has been accus- 
tomed. The proceeds, after deducting ten 
per cent for the Actors' Fund of America, 
will go to the League, for the Expense 
and Maintenance Fund. 



JUSTINE JOHNSON MARRIES 
Walter Wanger, theatrical manager, 
and Justine Johnston, the stage beauty, 
were married Saturday afternoon in City 
Hall, the ceremony being performed by 
City Clerk P. J. Scully. Beatrice Wan- 
ger, a sister of the groom, Ralph Ranlett 
and a few other friends, witnessed the 
ceremony. 

The marriage was the culmination of 
a romance which started three years ago, 
soon after Wanger started his theatrical 
career by presenting Nazimova in "Cep- 
tion Shoals." He will soon present his 
wife in "Profane Love," a drama founded 
onNjtstory by Balzac. It was for this pro- 
dnctiaa that Miss Johnston left mnaical 
comedy ^<Jast season and went into stock 
to learn dsamatic acting. 



EARL FULLER'S BAND TOURING 

Shenandoah, Pa, Sept, 14.— Earl Ful- 
ler's orchestra, which played at the Caf« 
de Paris, New York, formerly Bector'a, 
recently, is on tour here. The band played 
at Maher's Auditorium here Wednesday 
and Friday and appeared at Shamokin on 
Thursday, playing at Haste Park. 

STARTS 34- WEEK TOUR 
The San Carlo Grand Opera Company, 
of which Fortuno Gallo and Charles R- 
Baker an managers, has started a tour 
of the United States and Canada which 
will extend Into next May. -The tour win 
ajsj them to the western coasts of Canada 
and the.. United States, and back to the 
East again. 



METROPOLITAN RAISES PRICES 

The Metropolitan Opera Company an- 
nounced early this week that prices for 
admission to the opera house will be in- 
creased this winter. The statement said 
that there would be no advance in the 
price of subscription tickets but that the 
price of non-subscription seats in the or- 
chestra and orchestra circle will be ad- 
vanced to $7 and, for the dress circle, to 
$4. No advance will be made in the prices 
of seats in the balcony and the family 
circle. The advance means ' $1 mon in 
both classes of seats affected. 



"HY LADY FRIEND" STARTS 

Rehearsals win be started on "My 
Lady Friend" on; Sent. 22. with.. Clifton 
Crawford, in the leading role. The play 
was written by Frank Handel and pfl 
Nitray, and win be produced by H. H. 
Fraxee. 



V. A. F. FORMS NEW RUttf 

London, Bug, Sept. 6. — There Wsw a 
meeting of the V. A. F. last week to deter- 
mine the rules by which a successor to 
Fred Russell shall be chosen. Russell has 
resigned as chairman of the Variety 
Artists' Federation. 

It was Toted that the office be confined 
to members of the Federation and profea- 



NEW TRIPLE ALLIANCE ACTIVE 

The triple alliance, A. L. EruSager, 
Charles B. DHHngham and Florenx Zieg- 
{eld, have taken ever the New Amsterdam 
Theatre from the Klaw and Erlanger Con- 
struction Company, which has run the 
house since it was built sixteen years ago. 

The new lessees have ..taken over the 
house for a term of years, said to be ten, 



aion exclusively, i it .was; proposed jthatcbeginnfag. September, 18, and the fust pro- 
whoever is elected shall devote tbejrhole - duetion to be housed' in the house under 
of his time to bis office and- shall net' be 
permitted to' perform while holding office. 
He is to receive a salary of $75 a week 
as chai rm a n . He must also meet with all 
the qualifications as to full benefit, proper 
s tanding , references, etc AB prospective 
candidates must be ready to answer the 
following questions: Age, nati o nal ity, pro* 
s saa f ssMs experience, commercial experi* 
esee- (if any), positions held oflrer- than 
that sf music hall artiste, where edseatedV 
legs? and literary knowledge and experi- 
ence (if* any), what knowledge of foreign 
languages, how long in tne Federatiso, and 
salary required (which nrasf not exceetf 
£15 per week). Candidates an required? 
to furnish two references as to -personal 
character, and to state when' they ea.tr take 
up the duties if elected. 



SEEK TO BAN DNffORM 
Losdos, Eng., Sept. 5".— Commander 
Kenworthy has proposed a' bill' which is- 
now before the House of Commons by 
which it is sought to prohibit" the' use of 
the Mercantile Marine Uniform on the 
stage. The Board of Trade does' not ap- 
prove of the measure. It claims that the 
army and navy have not objected' to the 
use of their uniforms on the stage and that 
it has not brought disrepute upon' them, so 
why should the Mercantile Marine sees: to 
ban its uniform from the stage. 



"HOME AND BEAUTY" LOOKS GOOD 
London, Eng, Sept 14. — A' new play 
written by Somerset Maugham called 
"Home and Beauty," was produced.' here 
at the Playhouse last week, and achieved 
a success. The piece is in three acts, and 
deals with the exploits of Victoria in- Ber 
home in Westminster. The scenes show 
respectively a bedroom, a kitchen and a 
parlor. The cast of the piece was: Mr. 
Charles Hawtrey, Mr. Malcolm' Cherry, 
Mr. Hubert Harben, Mr. Eyston- Erie, 
Mr. Alfred Ayre, Miss Lottie Venne;. Miss 
Jean Cadell, Miss Laura Lydia; Miss 
Doris Cooper, Miss Kate Somervell; Miss 
Gladys Cooper. 



HOLD BENEFIT FOR STAGE rxABDS 
Newark, Sept. 13. — A benefit vaudeville 
performance is to be held on Sunday after- 
noon at the Broad Street Theatre, the 
proceeds of which are to go to the sick 
and death fnnd of the Newark- Theatrical 
Stage Hand's Union. 

Those billed to appear are Cora Young- 
blood Corson and her band, the Havilocks, 
Evelyn Elkins. Otto Brothers, Patsy 
Doyle, Evans, Johnson and Evans, Tabor 
and Clair, Bell and Carom antkjjuinn and 
Caverly. 



ntkOuinn 



ROCK MARRIES ENGLISH GIRL 
William Rock, the dancer, surprised his 
friends this week with- the announcement 
of his marriage to Gladys TiCbury, of 
Brighton, England, well known ' on the 
other side as a musical comedy star. They 
met on the stage of a London theatre. 
Rock met her when she- eaxue off the Aqui- 
tania. They were- married, and then 
rushed to Baltimore where "What's the 
Odds," the dance numbers of which were 
staged by Bock is playing. 



- ESDEN MADE DIRECTOR 

London, Eag, Sept 5.— Harry Esdea, 
who has been an official of the Sunderland 
Empires sinee their inception twelve years 
ago, has been elected to the board of 
directors of the concern. This election, 
however, will not interfere with his other 
activities as booking manager of the the- 
atres. 



FRIARS TO DINE SPAULDING 
The Friars' Club is to tender a dinner 
in the Han of the Monastery on Sunday 
evening, September 28th to Albert Spald- 
ing, the Tioliniat 



the new lease is Ziegfeldfs "Follies," which 
resumed its interrupted run then, hut 
week. The show had been forced to close 
during the recent acton' strike 

The details of the terms and conditions 
under which the recently formed triple al- 
liance took over the theatre were not di- 
vulged in the announcement sent ont from 
their offices, but dke deal is said to involve 
an aggregate sum of $1,000,000. For, be- 
sides the theatre itself, Erlanger, Dilling- 
ham and Ziegfeld will also control the 
valuable office building built iw canjunc- 
tie-o with the theatre. It is in this bund- 
ing Erlanger, Ziegfeld, and Marc Klaw. 
Etfsager's erstwhile partner, have their of- 
fices. But it is now a question of time 
wfrea Klaw will give up his office in the 
New Amsterdam Theatre Building and 
open- them elsewhere with his son Joe, 
whose theatrical activities the father is 
fostering. 

Recently there was organized the 
Newanx Theatre Corporation, a leasing eor- 
poratioa, with a capitalization' of $10,000, 
whose organizers wen mentioned as be- 
ing A L. Erlanger, Thomas F. Garrity 
and Mortimer Fishel v the latter Erlanger'* 
attorney. This corporation, it is said, was 
really organized to take over the New 
-Amsterdam Theatre property, the theatre 
to be run by Erlanger, Dillingham and 
Ziegfeld, the latter two 9f whom wilt soon 
"become directors of the new corporation. 

This is the first theatrical, deal of any 
magnitude entered upon jointly by the 
triple alliance since 'it was announced a 
few months ago that they had formed; the 
alliance. However, at least two of the 
three have always held a proprietary in- 
terest in the "Follies" and all of them 
in the "EBtehy-Koo" show in which Ray- 
mond Hichcock is appearing. 

It.- was reported early this week that 
Erlanger had picked a site for a new 
louse in Cleveland. 



BOSTON SHUNNED PLAYS 

Boston, Mass, Sept 15. — Due to the 
policemen's strike, the theatrical situation 
here became so discouraging that the man- 
agers held a meeting on Friday to discuss 
the advisability of closing all the play- 
houses for the coming week. The meet- 
ing was called because it had been im- 
possible to get audiences of any material 
size in the face of the riotous conditions 
that prevailed. 

Official warnings to keep off the street 
after nightfall, pins the natural alarm 
that was bound to exist in such a condi- 
tion made going to the theatre a remote 
thought in the average mind: At the meet- 
ing, it was finally decided, however, to 
keep the theatres open, and now that the 
strike is over, they an looking forward 
to a practically normal week. During the 
strike it was not unusual for a theatre- 
goer to check his Colt automatie in the 
cheek-room. 



COHAN'S DAUGHTER ENTERS FILMS 

Georgette Cohan, daughter of George M 
Cehan and Ethel Levey, win shortly make 
he* motion-picture debut with the Pamous- 
Piayera Lasky Corporation. She is at 
present in England with her mother. Ar- 
rangements for her engagement were made 
by Jesse Lasky and M S. Bentham, the 
latter npresenting Ethel Levey in this 
country. 



HOPFER TAKES "BETTER OLE" 
DeWolf Hopper has purchased from 
Mr. and Mrs. Coburn the territorial rights 
to "The Better Ole" for the season of 
1919-20, with sn option for future sea- 
sons. The transaction was negotiated by 
James. F. Kerr, who ia interested with 
Hopper in the management of . the show. 
They will retain the company intact in 
all probability. The only change in 
routing ia that two or three Canadian 
date, bar* bees eWminated. 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW TARE CLIPPER 



CONEY ISLANDERS HOPE TO 

COVER L OSS WITH MARDI GRAS 

But a Wet Day to Start with Dampens Their Hope* and Conces- 
sionaires Stand in Road of Losing More Than $200,000 on 

Season of Bad Breaks. 



aw? - 



s -■ 



Concessionaries at Coney Island hope to 
recover a season's loss of more than 
$2,000,000 with the profits of the Mardi 
Gras which opened on Monday, night to 
ran fire days. This is their only hope to 
"break even" on the year for the Mardi 
Gras marks the closing of the present sea- 
son, which has been the most disastrions 
one that Coney Island has ever experienced. 

This financial disaster came from a com- 
bination of causes. First, its bad weather ; 
later, a car strike; and, at all times, pro- 
hibition which dealt the most severe blow 
to beach business. 
-The Mardi Gras week, however, started 
off very badly, for Monday was rainy and 
cold, and the thousands and thousands of 
pleasure seekers that were expected to 



throng the Island were not there. 

Luna Park has doubled its personnel for 
Carnival Week. 

The Steeple Chase has divided the week 
into "special" nights: Navy Night, Army 
Night, State Night, City Government 
Night, and so forth, and in each case a 
special program hag been provided to fix 
the event. 

At Henderson's Theatre, "Yankee Doodle 
in Berlin," with the Mack Sennett Bathing 
Beauties, is the holiday feature. In ad- 
dition ta appearing at Henderson's, the 
bathing girls are the features of the Carni- 
val Pageant. 

The smaller parks and concessions have 
all provided themselves with novel carni- 
val features. 



"JUST A MINUTE" NEEDS WORK 

Baltimore, Md., Sept. 15. — Presented 
for the first time on any stage, a new 
comedy was offered by John Cort this . 
evening at the Academy of Music, and, like 
all new plays, needs some of its rough 
edges taken off. As a whole, though, it 
goes well and was especially well received 
by its first audience. The authors of this 
play are Harry L. Cort, George B. Stod- 
dard and Harold Orlob. 

There are some mighty clever lines in 
the piece, but often they were not suited 
to the person delivering them. Probably 
it was the newness of the play that made 
them seem mismated. After everything is 
smoothed over each actor can give full jus- 
tice to his bright lines. When this has 
been accomplished there will be little else 
to do, for "Just A Minute" has a plot, and 
a good one. Besides, it is replete with 
artistic and striking costumes worn by a 
pretty chorus, with the scenery quite in 
harmony. The music is lacking neither in 
melody nor originality, and a pair of well 
known feminine dancers are only two of 
the terpsichorean successes. 

The story centres upon a youth who hap- 
pens to be wealthy, bnt who, unfortunately 
is obliged to earn his living for a time 
without making known his real name. His 
"allegorical" name is "The Trouble," a fit- 
ting title, for it is through him that two 
romances are almost broken up. He falls 
in love with his friend's rumored fiancee, 
but the fiancee's aunt is hoping for the 
rumored match to become real. Unex- 
pected turns of the plot occur, keeping the 
story alive and interesting. 

It seems that "The Trouble" will have 
the fiancee and the friend of the romance 
will have the fiancee's friend (a girl), all 
of which is just as puzzling on the stage as 
in description. Auntie interferes, and, 
judging by circumstantial evidence, she 
thinks ber dreams for her niece nave come 
true." Bnt auntie's' bubbles burst and - the 
lovers' troubles all are straightened out 

Without a doubt, Bobby Watson, who 
plsys the role of "The Trouble," . carries 
the lead, for every line of his part is not 
only given justice, but is even improved 
by his clever acting. He and Eva Pock, 
who played the fiancee, make good dancing 
partners, for both step with ease. Nat 
Carr followed next as the pilot, or cap- 
tain Ebb Tide. He took the part of the 
Scotch seaman well But his droll humor 
hit a more responsive chord with the bath- 
ing girl, played by Virginia Clark, than 
with the aunt by Bertha Belmore. The 
Morin Sisters, who Were the "specialty" 
dancers, won a warm spot in the hearts of 
their audience, for they were extremely 
good. The introduction in the last act of 
a solo on an accordeon by Deiro was a 
trifle out of place, although his playing 
was excellent . ..-. 

Others in the cast were Letty Yorke, 
Jack Boyle,- Al White, Will GoodaH, the 
Saymonr Brothers and Bertha Belmore. 



"THE DANCER" IS A HIT 

Atlantic City, N. J., Sept. 15. — To- 
night saw the reopening of the legitimate 
theatre here, when, at the Globe, the ' 
Messrs. Shubert presented for the first 
time Edward Locke's comedy "The 
Dancer," to a house that was literally 
packed to the doors. The loss of the legiti- 
mate drama, temporary as it was, had 
been keenly felt in this city, where thou- 
sands come each week. So that it was at 
a very auspicious time that this hew com- 
edy made its debut. It possesses all of the 
skill customarily found in the products of 
Mr. Locke's pen, and even in spite of the 
propitious temper of the audience, won its 
applause by right of quality. 

Mr. Locke has chosen for his theme the 
struggle between art and the home." A 
dancer of considerable ability and tame is 
loved by an American with Puritanic 
ideals. Though he has never seen her per- 
form, he does not care to, yet he follows 
her practically all over the world, his love 
strong and unwavering. In the end, of 
course, he triumphs and they find hap- 
piness. 

The play is extremely well written. In 
drawing his characters,. Mr. Locke has 
made none of them paragons. Their faults, 
as well as their virtues, are accurately 
painted, giving them a distinctive reality. 
He speaks tersely and wisely of Lfe, set- 
ting his scene pastorally, and contrasting 
against the peaceful country background, 
the petty sordidness of social system. 

In "The Dancer," the author has built 
his developments with a beautiful sub- 
tlety and ease, extracting therefrom a con- 
vincing impression of perfect naturalness 
so gradual are the transitions. The influ- 
ence of a hidebound family, given over al- 
most irrevocably to their traditions, upon 
the life of the bride and groom, is star- 
tling ly human and their success in sepa- 
rating them temporarily is at once dra- 
matic and logical. 



DUVRIES ACCUSES BACHMAN 
Chicago, 11!.. Sept. 13. — Sam Dnvries, 
formerly a local booking manager, has 
brought charges against Fred Bachman, 
charging him with embezzlement. The 
case will be heard late this month. 

Bachman alleges that . he worked for 
Dnvries and received no salary but was 
working on a commission basis. He re- 
tained part of his commission and it was 
on that point that Dnvries swore out a 
warrant. Friends of Bachman state that 
Dnvries will be unable to prove his 
charges. 



CHICAGO PARKS CLOSING 
ChIcago, IIL, :! Sept? 1L— Riverview 
Park' and White City will end their sea- 
sons on Sept. 21, closing one of the moat 
successful years known to the history of 
Chicago's outdoor amusements. "■* 



EDDIE LEONARD SHOW OPENS 

Baltimore, Md., Sept. 15. — Eddie Leon- 
ard received a royal welcome at Ford's to- 
night, where 'he is playing in "Holy Boly 
Eyes," one of the two new John Cort 
musical comedies having tberr^flrgt ni ghts" 
in Baltimore this week.' : '-lll Bise? v'etWRr* 
welcome, for, with his charming, buojaaip-. 
personality, his grace, SssrsSSg&l rid, « 
musical voice, he inmost of die; pew show. 
He is the mainstay and around 'Mm are 
gathered many really pretty 4$rls, severs} 
clever dancers, a sprinkling of oldtime min- 
strel show business, and a book that has a 
good story, and just a little pathos. 

It can be seen from this that "Boly Boly 
Byes" is somewhat motley as a produc- 
tion, and there is certainly the most goodly 
use of horseplay that has been seen in sev- 
eral seasons bnt it delighted last night's 
audience. It has lota of jazs and boister- 
ousnesstjbnt these qualities are carried off 
with considerable grace and lightness, and 
combined, made several hours of real di- 
version. Like most of the musical comedy 
written in the last two yean, the comedy 
is heavy. 

"Boly Boly Eyes" has five dancers, Ed- 
die Leonard, who cannot dance too much 
to suit his audience: Queenie Smith, who 
has a winning childishness of manner and 
much grace; Kate Pullman, whose work is 
a series of amazing stunts; Earl Gates, 
Miss Pullman's dancing partner, and Mar- 
garet Edwards. In this case, being last 
means being best, for, from the standpoint 
of dancing. Miss Edwards* act waa re- 
markable. 

The music is not particularly pretty, 
nor do the airs seem new, but, in the first 
act "Old-Fashioned Flowers," makes a 
charming number, and the audience was 
completely won at the end of the second 
act when Leonard sang "Boly Boly Byes," 
bringing the chorus up about him for the 
finale in real minstrel show style. 

The scenes are laid around the home of 
Judge and Mrs. Robert Warren, whose 
son left home four years before, because of 
bis innocent part in the floating of fraudu- 
lent stock. Letters necessary to prove his 
innocence are missing and he leaves town 
because of the feeling against him hi the 
village. Besides his father and mother, 
he has left a sweetheart, Ida Loring, and 
when he comes back, unrecognized by his 
family, as a member of a traveling min- 
strel troupe, he finds her being courted by 
Myron Rentham, the man who waa really 
guilty of defrauding the villagers. More- 
over, Rentham has become a member of 
Judge Warren's law firm. Of course, he 
finally proves bis innocence just in time 
to save Ida from marrying the play's vil- 
lain. 

Ed Mazier, as the comic in the minstrel 
show, waa amusing. H. D. Blakemorr 
as Peter, the old gardener, made a good 
character study. Adora Andrews was sat- 
isfactory as Mrs. Warren, the mother,, and 
the audience enjoyed Mae Boley, though 
her comedy was certainly weighty. 

" Some of the costumes in "Boly Boly 
Eyes" are beautiful, some are smart, and 
there are the inevitable black lace pajamas, 
more daring than artistic. 



THEATRE SAFE ROBBED 

Chicago, 111., Sept 11. — The safe of the 
American Theatre was blown late last 
week and $2,000 was taken by the robbers. 
This is the fourth time the safe has been 
blown within two years. Police working 
on the case state that some one familiar 
with the doings of the theatre is implicated 
in the affair. No trace of the robbers has 
been had since the affair took place. 



"KEEP IT TO YOURSELF' OPENS 
George Broadhurst opened a tour of 
"Keep It To Yourself," with Edwin Ni- 
cander in the leading role, at Teller's Shu- 
bert Theatre, Brooklyn, last Monday night 
In the cast" of the piece besides Nicander 
are Albert Brown, Alphonz Ethier, Dallas 
Welford, Robert Lowe, John BerkeU, Ar- 
thur Upson, Clara Maekin, Hortense Al- 
den and Pearl Ford. 



ARRESTED FOR FRAUD 

London, Eng., Sept 15. — Basil Reginald 
Jarvis, an entertainer, has been arrested 
and ia being tried foi fraud. He haa been 
advertising for demobilized officers to com- 
municate with him regarding position aa 
managers of concert parties. Francis T. 
Price answered the advertisement and was 
asked to invest $875 as interest in an en- 
terprise. He did so, bnt when he got to 
the place he had been assigned to manage, 
Be found ^hat there waa no concert party 
there. He turned the matter over to the 
police. 



BERNARD SHOW CAST COMPLETED 

The cast of "The Honorable Sam Davis," ' 
the new starring vehicle for Barney Ber- 
nard which Jules Eckert Goodman and 
Montague Glass have written, has been 
completed and when the piece opens in 
Philadelphia on September 22, in the cast 
will be Augusta Burmeister, Lucille Eng- 
lish, Jimmy Spottawood, Jack Crosby, 
Martin Also p. Robert Cu minings. Stanley 
Jessup, Harold Voaburg, Frank Kirke. 
George Parnum, Bertram Miller, Ruth 
McDonald. 



WEBER DOINC TWO SHOWS 
L. Lawrence Weber haa elaborate plana 
for next season and has announced the 
production of the following plays: "Letty 
Arrives," by Sidney Rosenfeld, to be pro- 
duced on October 15, and coming into New 
York two weeks later. "The Beautiful Vir- 
gin," by H. H. Durant, a new playwright 
will be produced shortly after "Letty Ar- 
rives." He has two more new plays in 
mind for early productions. 



"DARK ROSALEEN" TO OPEN 
David Belasco win present "Dark Roaa- 
leen" for an engagement of two weeks, 
starting Saturday, at the Manhattan 
Opera House. In the cast are: Walter 
Edewin, Henry Duffey, Thomas Mitchell, 
Dodson L. Mitchell, P. J. Kelly, John 
Daly Murphy, George Fitzgerald, How- 
ard Truesdell, Eileen Huban, Rose Mor- 
rison and Jane Rose. 



COCHRAN IS BUSY 

Loudon, Eng., Sept. 14. — C. B. Cochran, 
the producer, has many plana for next 
season, among them the production of 
several new plays and the revival of some 
old classics. 

Among the new ones will be "Afgar," an 
extravaganza by Cnvellier. In this will ap- 
pear Mile. Delysia, Mr. Harry Welchman, 
Mr. John Humphries, Mr. Luplno Lane, 
Miss Marie Burke and Miss Dollie Keppell. 

CORT REHEARSING THREE 
Three companies start rehearsals this 
week in plays to be produced by John Cort. 
"Fiddlers Three," with Tavie Beige, will 
open its season in Providence on Septem- 
ber 28. Fritzi Scheff will open in "Glori- 
anna" in Detroit on October 5. "Flo Flo" 
with Handera and Millis, will also open 
on October 5 in Cincinnati. 



"GOOD MORNING JUDGE" OPENING 
"Good Morning Judge" will open at the 
Shubert-Riviera Theatre September 29 for 
a week's engagement, with the following 
principals in the cast: George HasselL 
Shep Camp, Allen Kearns, Asbton Tonge, 
Bereaford Lovett, Beatrice Curtis, Loretto 
Sheridan, Peggy Pates and Alice Fleming. 



ETHEL BARRYMORE PICKS PLAY 

The new play in which Ethel Barry- 
more will be seen at the Empire Theatre 
when it opens its season, is called "De- 
classe." It wss written by Zoe Atkins. 



WHITE RATS HOLDING MEETING 
Chicago, 111., Sept 12. — A meeting of 
many: local White Rats will b* held nere 
next 'Friday. According to reports Harry 
Mountford will preside. 



SIGNS FOR GIRL ACT 

Chicago, Hi, Sept. 11.— "Bud," of the 
team of "Bud & Ham," prominent in the 
movies, has signed with the Frank Rich 
Company to head a big girl act, which will 
appear in vaudeville throughout the West 
Jackson Murray, Betty Park and the Brex 
Sisters, supported by a chorus of ten, will 
make up the act: which will bear the title 
of- "Bud" and '"The Buddie Girls ia 
Paris.'; The act will be ready tor. book- 
ings about Sept 15. 



THE KEW YORK CLIPPER 



Sfeptembfer 17/1919 




SALARIES OF GIRLS IN BIG 

TIME TABLO IDS SOARING 

Several Producers Last Week Offered from $40 to $50 for 
Efficient Choristers, Only to Find Them Still 
Scarce — Dislike to Go on Road . 



Chorus girl salaries in vaudeville acta 
have been steadily soaring until it was 
repotted last week that fifty dollars per 
week had been offered in several instances, 
while many others are receiving from 
thirty-five to forty-five dollars, per week. 
Bnt even with these high salaries there 
is said to be a scarcity. 

The reason for this is found in the fact 
that burlesque, legitimate and the moving 
pictures demand so many girls. It was 
thought, though, that, with the closing of 
cabarets, the girl situation in regard to 
vaudeville would be simplified. But the 
cabaret girl is looking for work that will 
not necessitate travel, choosing to remain 
in New York rather than take to the road. 



At the offices of William B. Fried- 
lander, it was stated that a number of his 
chorus girls are now receiving fifty dollars 
and that none receive under forty. William 
R. Meyers stated that his m '" 1 '""'" pay 
for chorus girls is now thirty-five. 

Chorus girls in legitimate productions 
who have just won higher salaries as a 
result of their strike, even now receive 
les9 than their vaudeville sisters, the le- 
gitimate wage being thirty dollars in New 
York and thirty-five dollars on the road. 

Some of the big time tab producers are 
making an effort to induce girls in singles 
and man-and-girl acts on small time, who 
cannot secure steady bookings, to join a 
big time chorus, where their weekly earn- 
ing is both substantial and "sure." 



POLI TO BUILD TWIN THEATRES 

Bridgeport, Conn., Sept. 15. — S. Z. Poli 
is ; to build two theatres which will be twin 
houses, on the site recently acquired by 
him, and known as the Wheeler estate. 
The property fronts on Main street for 223 
feet and runs back '245 feet on Congress 
and Arch streets. It was his original in- 
tention to build a million dollar theatre 
on the site, but at the last moment he 
changed his plans and has commissioned 
Thomas W. Lamb to plan the twin the- 
atres. One of the houses is to be a vaude- 
ville and picture house and the other 
strictly pictures. It is said that this is 
only the first of similar ventures in other 
cities. Poli now controls the theatrical 
centre in Bridgeport. 



GAMBLE COUNTS MARCHERS 

Valand Gamble, the "human compto- 
meter," who recently returned from 
service overseas, was on hand to Bee the 
Pershing parade and counted every man, 
woman, horse and vehicle that passed. 
His estimate, it is said, has been proven 
to be correct. He gave the number of 
marchers as 27,234. 

This feat of calculation earned him one 
of the best pieces of publicity any per- 
former has had in years. A New York 
daily printed hie estimate of the parade, 
with their own tabulation as proof of its 
correctness, and the story was syndicated 
throughout the country. Gamble is at 
present trying out a new act around New 
York. 



PANT AGES HAS NEW LANDLORD 

San Francisco, CaL, Sept. 14. — The 
Pantages Theatre Building here, sold to 
J. C. Zellerbach a few days ago, for $275,- 
000, has been resold to Henry G. Meyer at 
a substantial advance. The property, 
which is 90x165, contains offices and a 
class A theatre that is leased to Alex- 
ander Pantages and yielding a rental of 
560,000 a year. The theatre was erected 
after the fire by Pantages and the office 
structure- was added by the owners. 



GARVIE GOING INTO VAUDE 

Eddie Garvie, the comedian of John 
Cbrt's "Listen Lester," is going into vaude- 
ville in a new comedy sketch by Cyrus 
Wood, to be named shortly. Under the 
title of "Her Debut In Dnbuque". the 
sketch wag presented at the Friars- 
Lambs benefit at the Metropolitan Opera 
House last spring. 



• PROCTOR TO REMODEL HOUSE 

Albany, N. Y., Sept. 15. — The Proctor 
Theatre here. The Leland, is to be com- 
pletely remodeled and enlarged at a cost 
of $50,000. The work is to be done by 
John C. Nolan and supervised by J. W. 
Merrow. The Leland is one of the most 
famous theatres ' in Albany. There is a 
building north of the theatre, owned by 
Mr. Proctor, which will be used in re- 
modeling the house. 



KELLY AND POLLOCK BACK 

Jim Kelly and Emma Pollock have a 
new vaudeville act that has been pre- 
pared for them by William R. Meyers 
and which will start playing soon over the 
U. B. O. The team of Kelly and Pollock 
has just returned from overseas where 
they entertained the soldiers for more 
than a year. 



ORPHEUM MCR. GETS ESTATE 

Montreal, Canada, Sept. 15. — Harry 
Cornell, manager of the Orpheum, Oak- 
land, Cal., has arrived here to settle his 
father's estate. The deceased left about 
$100,000. This will be divided equally 
between Harry and two other sons. After 
the estate is settled, Cornell will return 
to the Oakland house. 



GOING INTO PALAIS ROYAL SHOW 

Herbert Clifton, the burlesque female 
impersonator, will go into the Palais 
Royal show this week. Lubovska, the 
dancer, will also appear in the same re- 
vue, starting next Monday evening. Both 
were engaged through Sol TJnger. 



IRENE BORDONI TO STAR 

The Irene Bordoni and Gitz-Rice vaude- 
ville act will split after three weeks, and 
Miss Bordoni will be starred in a new 
comedy with songs, called "Collette Comes 
Across." The piece is by Glen MacDon- 
ough and Martin Brown, and the produc- 
tion is to be put out by Ray Goetz. 

TWO ACTS GET ROUTES 

Marty Brooks has routed two of his 
new acts for next season. Jimmy Gildea, 
in a new act called "Hidden Treasure" 
starts a tour on October 8. "Some Bull," 
with Johnny Morris, has been routed over 
the big time for the entire season. 

NADEL TURNS EDITOR 

E. K. Nadel, of the Pat Casey offices, is 

to be the editor of a weekly organ for 

Caeey clients and friends. The sheet will, 

of course, be distributed free and will 

be known as "Talent." 



NEW ACTS 

"Salvation Molly" is the title of ' a 
sketch which Frank Belmont has just put 
on. John T. Doyle wrote the act, which is 
now playing on . the Fox time. Marie 
Stockwell is the featured performer in a 
cast of three. 

Pop Ward and Arthur Yule are present- 
ing a new act, entitled "The New Di- 
rector." 

Samuel Jaffe, recently discharged from 
the service, has a new single comedy act 
which he will shortly present in vaude- 
ville. This will be his debut on the va- 
riety stage, for before the war he was 
connected with the Washington Square 
Players. 

' Eddie Tanner and Company, two people, 
have a new act by G. Wolford Barry, en- 
titled "Johnny's Visit." It is a song and 
talk offering. 

"The California Bathing Beauties" is a 
new act which the Coast Amusement Com- 
pany is producing. It will have eight girls 
in the cast and be presented with motion 
pictures which are now being produced by 
the F. and L. Film Corporation. 

Albert Perry, just returned from over- 
seas, is preparing a new act. He was a 
member of the James Forbes Stock Com- 
pany, the first American stock company 
to go to France. He will use "Reno and 
Return," an " act by Thomas Grant 
Springer, in which he was eeen a few 
years ago, as his vehicle. John C. Peebles 
will handle the act. 

Sam Erlich is the author of a new act 
with sixteen people to be produced by 
Sam Kessler. - , 

Louis Hallet has acquired a new one-act 
playlet called "Uneasy Money," by E. L. 
Smith, which he is now rehearsing. 

Bobbie Robbing, who has been a super- 
visory secretary for the Y. M. C A., is 
framing a new act for the two-a-day. 

'^Extra Dry," a new girl act by William 
Friedlander, is now in rehearsal and will 
break in shortly. Among the principals in 
the piece are Beth Stanley, Gertrude 
Mudge and Ben Fairbanks. 

Myrtle Lawler and Arnold Grazer have 
a new two-act under the direction of 
Marty Brooks. 

Irene_ Chesleigh and Georgie Stone are 
rehearsing a new musical comedy act 
with eight people. 

"Cold Turkey," a girl act with ten peo- 
ple, two of them principals, will open soon 
under the direction of Herman Becker. 

Louis and Leona, man and woman, will 
open on the U. B. O. Circuit on Oct. 6 
under the direction of Paul Dempsey. 

Ruth Goodwin will open on the Loew 
time on Sept. 29, booked through Tom 
Jones. 

Ada Gunther will start a tour of the? 
Loew Circuit on October 6, under the di- 
. rection of Tom Jones. 

Mason and Bailey, two colored men who 
have recently been discharged from the 
army, will start a tour of the Loew. Cir- 
cuit on Sept. 22, booked through Sol 
Turek. 

Jean and Norah Goldie, assisted by a 
pianist, will shortly present a new song 
and talk act by Herman Ruby and Sammy 
Ward. 

Hart and Lowrie have a new act by 
Sammy Ward. Joe Michaels is doing the 
booking. 

"Loveland Bound" is the title of a new 
act which Dick Maddock wrote and is pro- 
during. It has a cast of eleven, of whom 
five are principals. These are Laura Kelly, 
Janette Stone, Dick Maddock, Ralph Cole- 
man and Arthur Jennings. 

Gold and Burr, colored comedians, have 
a new act by Sammy Ward. They will 
present it shortly on the Loew Circuit. 

MEYERS HAS NEW ACT 

"Rip Van Winkle's Resurrection" is the 
name of a new musical act of nine per- 
sons which William R. Meyers hopes to 
land on the big time. It is now in re- 
hearsal. Those in the cast are Murry 
Brown, May West, the Palmer Sisters, 
Harry Spence, Jack Hilliard, Fay Mont- 
gomery, James Hart and Laura Tearle. 



BRANDELL'S WIFE ATTACKED 

Belle Brandell, actress, and wife of the 
vaudeville tabloid' producer William Bran- 
dell, was attacked last week and nar- 
rowly escaped injuries at the hands of 
Glen B. Christy, a former first lieutenant 
in the Army. Christy, who has been suf- 
fering from shell shock and possessed a 
large store of ammunition, together with 
a number of rifles and revolvers, aimed a 
rifle loaded with buckshot at Mrs. Brandell 
through a window. She notified the police 
and they arrested him. He was pardoned 
on condition - that he remove from his 
present residence, 525 Weat 138th street. 
He was then rearrested on the charge of 
violating the Sullivan law and held in 
$2,000 bail. 



VICTORIA HAS NEW MANAGER 

Joe Vogel has been appointed manager 
of the Victoria Theatre by the Loew 
office, succeeding Jerome Seward, placed 
in charge of Loew's 116th street house. 
The latter is the son of the late Charles 
E. Seward and was placed in charge of 
the Victoria following the death of his 
father, several months ago. 

Vogel is twenty-four years old, and has 
been connected with the Loew thetres in 
Brooklyn for the last five years. Previ- 
ous to his appointment as manager of 
the Victoria he acted in a like capacity at 
the Palace, Brooklyn. 

FRANCES NORDSTROM LUCKY 

This has been a busy week for Frances 
Nordstrom. Through the Laura D. 
Wilck*s agency she has disposed of two 
plays, while the third, a comedy, is now 
being considered by Andre Chariot. 

"The Ruined Lady," a play by Miss 
Nordstrom that was tried out earlier this 
year in Buffalo and Clveeland, has been ac- 
cepted by Grace George and will follow 
"She Would and She Did." On Monday 
she disposed of a musical comedy, "Room 
44," to Cohan and Harris. It has been 
promised an early production. 



MOSS THEATRES CHANGE 

B. S. Moss' Hamilton and Regent The- 
atres, which opened last week under the 
Famous Players-Lasky policy of one pic- 
ture a week, coupled with variety features, 
have changed their policy and are showing 
two shows a week. Harry W. Meyers has 
been engaged to conduct the thirty piece 
orchestra at the Hamilton Theatre. 



MORGAN AND GRAY COMPLAIN 

' The team of Morgan and Gray have 
made a complaint to the N. V. A., charging 
Henery and May with using their mate- 
rial. In the Morgan and Gray act there 
is a line, "Today is Sunday and I don't 
have to work" and they claim that "To- 
day is the Fourth of July and I don't 
have to work." a line used by the other 
team, is an infringement on their act. 



MACK TO PLAY FOX ROLE 

Russell Mack of the vaudeville act of 
Mack and Vincent, has been engaged to 

Slay the Harry Fox role in Comstock and 
■est's "Oh, Look," which will open next 
week. The Dolly Sisters will be featured 
in the piece. 

ARDATH ENTERING BURLESQUE 

Fred Ardath, the producer, is to have a 
show on the National Burlesque Circuit, 
to open in Pittsburgh October 29. He re- 
ceived his franchise last Friday. 

MORT SINGER LEAVES 

Mort Singer, who was in New York 
last- week, has returned to Chicago, accom- 
panied by Martin Beck. The latter will 
remain in the West about a month. 



HUNTING. AND FRANCIS ROUTED 

Tony Hunting and Corrine Francis 
have been given a route carrying them up 
till next August. They will play all the 
Keith rime; * - 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 



Togan and Geneva, a man and woman 
tight wire act, opened and scored a nit 
The man is particularly clever, dancing 
upon the wire and finiahing with a com- 
plete somersault which brought them back 
for several bows. 

Raymond and Schram received a re- 
ception when they came on and were liber- 
ally applauded at the finish, chiefly on ac- 
count of an excellent song repertoire. The 
boys' voices are but mediocre; their sing- 
ing style not of the best; but their songs 
are excellent. 

• "For Pity's Sake," the burlesque melo- 
drama with Charles Duray featured, is 
still a big laugh provoker, although, it is 
not working with the speed and smooth- 
ness shown on previous appearances. Duray 
has been in the leading role long enough 
to make the most of the many comedy 
situations, but he misses many of the 
strong comedy bits seized upon by Withers 
when he appeared in the sketch. 

Ray Samuels, with a new song reper- 
toire, stopped the show and scored the 
big applause hit of the entire bill. . Miss 
Samuels, accompanied by a modest and. 
retiring blonde, attired in black, who 
played remarkably well, sang about the 
best collection of popular numbers heard 
in the Palace in many months. Opening 
with a "Girls" song, she next sang a num- 
ber telling of a boat's arrival from France, 
then a cleverly written and still better 
rendered "Rube" song telling of a farmer's 
visit to a big town. "Up in the Air" was 
next, then "I Love Him," a character song 
long in Belle Baker's repertoire. Her 
final song, and one which received encores 
by the dozen, was a screamingly funny 
lyric of the American Desert, the Pyra- 
mids of Broadway and the rains of the 
oahnrets as a result of prohibition. 

The Jazzland Naval Octette, a sailor 
act, in popular songs and instrumental se- 
lections, closed the first part to consider- 
able applause. 

After the showing of the Timely Topics, 
Anna Wheaton and Harry Carroll, held 
over for the second week, sang a number 
of new and old songs, most of them of 
Carroll's composition. One new one, a 
spelling "Tennessee" number, is melodious, 
but the writing of a song is one thing 
and the singing of it still another. Car- 
roll can write them, but when it comes to 
their rendition, he is indeed lacking. His 
voice is unmusical and his enunciation far 
from clear. Another new one .having some- 
thing to do with a Quaker was sung by 
Miss Wheaton. The Reviewer knows 
nothing of this one, neither did Miss 
Wheaton, who forgot the lines and strug- 
gled long and unsuccessfully to get it 
over. Carroll announced that this was its 
first rendition, so better things can be 
hoped for before the week is over. 

Frisco's Jazz Band followed the Car- 
roll act and the. dancer received a recep- 
tion when he came on to do his first dance. 
Miss McDermott, with some new and daz- 
zling costumes, made a pretty picture, in 
addition to doing some excellent dancing. 
A song has been put into the act and the 
new number called "Granny" was well 
sung by Frank Feener. In spite of the 
speed of the act and the snappy playing 
of the Jazz band, interest in the super 
syncopated tunes is fast disappearing. 
When first seen Frisco and his. band were 
little sliort of a sensation. Now it is an 
act and when compared with some that 
have been seen at this house, it leaves 
considerable to be desired. 

A. Bobbins, the instrumental man, as- 
sisted by a woman billed as "partner," al- 
though she has but little to do, followed 
and did well considering the abundance 
of music which he followed. Bobbins gives 
a number of remarkably faithful imita- 
tions of musical instruments and injects 
quite a bit of com edy i nto the act as well. 

Ten Eyck and Wiley Company closed 
the show with an artistic dancing act 
which held the audience in well until the 
finish. W. V. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(Con tinned from page ft end OB 1ft) 



COLONIAL 

The bill at the Colonial is replete with 
singing and dancing acts. 

Jack Hanley has a very good routine 
of juggling stunts, but most of his comedy 
gags have been seen before. The trick 
cuspidor, from which he continually spilled 
water derived from some mysterious 
source, has been used by numberless acts, 
also kicking a toy dog through a hoop. The 
juggling stunts, however, are well done and 
netted him a generous hand in the initial 
spot. 

McMahon, Diamond and Rosevere did 
not have any difficulty in scoring a big 
hit, although second position is a poor 
one for an act of their kind. The "Rag 
Doll" bit did not receive the applause that 
Diamond's eccentric dance was accorded, 
but it would be difficult to decide which of 
the two is better, for both are excellent. 
They took a large number of bows, which 
they deserved, and Diamond was given an 
especially large hand of applause. 

"The Ragged Edge." by Frances Nord- 
strom, is the title of a playlet which is a 
jazz travesty on a drama. .It is nicely 
presented and well handled by the cast. 
In verse, to a very catchy rhythm, the plot 
tells of a wife who, desiring to satisfy her 
craving for pretty clothes, steals a purse 
containing $200 from a woman in a beauty 
shop. She comes home and her husband 
discovers the theft. Just as she is about 
to be arrested, her- mother-in-law phones 
and tells about the robbery, saying that 
she is the owner of the purse. They tell 
her that the purse is in their house and 
that it was stolen as a joke. The idea, 
while clever, can be elaborated on to much 
better advantage. 

The Klein Brothers are still using most 
of their old material, but find the going 
easy. The boys have added a number of 
new gags, and, with Al's clowning, pulled 
many laughs. But new material would 
be a welcome' and acceptable change. 

The Mosconi Brothers, assisted by Elsie 
LaMont offered their "Dancing Odds and 
Ends" and went well. It must be said 
that when it comes to singing, the boys 
lack ability, and the finish of the act is 
poor to an extreme. Louis' dance con- 
tinues to be the feature of the offering, 
but . ran a shorter time than when the 
dancer was with Bessie Clayton. The 
boys did two dances together and one with 
Miss LaMont. The latter also did a sin- 
gle dance during the routine. After her 
dance came Louis' eccentric dance and 
then a finish dance by the two boys. Be- 
fore .the audience was hardly aware that 
this dance was over, the trio was taking 
bows. A closing nnmber, in which all 
three would appear, would be a much 
better finish. 

Luba Meroff and Company opened the 
second half with a few songs and dances. 
A 'cello solo is also included in the rou- 
tine. While the singing pleases, the Rus- 
sian eccentric dance of the young man in 
the company stands out as the best part 
of the act. 

Charles King, assisted by Una Fleming, 
Lucille Chalfont, Aileen Poe and Marie 
Holly-well, presented "Dream Stars," by 
Hansard Short. This wonderful classic 
of the vaudeville stage does not only con- 
tain beautiful costuming and settings, but, 
with King and the four girls with him, 
it has one of the best casts that could be 
assembled. 

Hunting and Francis, who recently re- 
turned to vaudeville after playing the Y. 
M. C. A. circuit in France were handi- 
capped by a position so far down on the 
bill, especially with such sure-fire acts 
preceding them. But they went over 
nicely. 

Alfred Farrell and Company closed the 
show with an exhibition of art done in 
rags, and* held the house. G. J. H. 



ORPHEUM 



The Nippon Duo, two men who, as the 
name suggests, are Japanese, led off with 
a varied act. They started with a song, 
one of them who was seated at the piano 
furnishing the accompaniment. There was 
a piano solo after that, a left-handed ren- 
dition of the sextette from "Lucia" and 
then another song. Some talking, evidently 
intended for comedy purposes, followed but 
did not cause much laughter. The work 
on the ukelele and the rialey work which 
closed made a good finish. 

Donald Kerr and Effie Weston offered 
a song and dance act which registered a 
great hit. The singing was only fair, but 
the dancing fast and gracefully executed. 
All of their terpsichorean numbers were 
snappy and of the jazzy variety, eliciting 
considerable applause and enabling the 
pair to take an encore in the form of a 
song and dance. The latter ended in a 
whirl that left both members of the duo 
breathless, and while the same sort of a 
finish has been used by many acts, it is 
a spectacular number and one that usually 
meets with approval. 

Tom Smith and Ralph Austin have an 
offering that included many bits of slap- 
stick comedy, a goodly portion of comedy 
talk and a vocal number by a girl whose 
name- is not announced. The farce on 
ventriloquists, used toward the finish, has 
been employed rather frequently. But the 
burlesque on the vaudeville caricaturist 
and xylophonist is a bit. that is original 
and good for a legitimate laugh. 

J. Francis Dooley and Corinne Sales, 
in their familiar offering, "Will Yer, Jim?" 
received a round of applause as soon as 
they came out. Their antics, talk and 
singing, were devoured with apparent 
relish by the audience, which was in a 
receptive mood. 'They seemed, however, to 
stretch their offering a bit too far, with 
the result that after the encore, the ap- 
plause waa very scant. The act should 
be cut somewhat, or the encore omitted. 

Carlos Sebastian, in a dance act which 
also includes some singing, (one song 
with a catchy melody running through the 
turn)., closed the initial portion of the 
show and won deserved favor. Sebastian, 
who is a capable exponent of the art of 
stepping has an able assistant in Olga 
Mjtb and a good pianist in Arthur Ander- 
son. "Bubbles," as the offering is called, 
is a splendidly staged act and pleasing ' to 
the eye. 

Jack Inglis scored his usual laughing hit 
with a collection of songs and witty bits 
of talk. For the greater part, the act is 
sure fire and Inglis put his material over 
with a genuine punch. The closing por- 
tion, centered about an incident in a 
saloon, with Inglis impersonating various 
characters and using different hats to de- 
note them, is a scream and had the crowd 
in an uproar. 

Elizabeth Murray injects a punch into 
her songs and stories, which have been 
wisely selected. Her work turned out to 
be just what the audience liked and, as 
a result, she registered heavily in a diffi- 
cult spot. 

Jimmy Hussey presented "Move On," 
his new comedy review, in which he is 
assisted by Tot Qualters and William 
Worsley, his "straight" man in bis soldier 
act, as well as by a jazz band. The offer- 
ing, needless to say, held the audience in 
until the close and the different bits were 
greeted with laughter and applause. There 
are numerous clever bits, and Hussey 
sings some of the songs with which he 
scored so heavily in his old act. Tot Qual- 
ters, formerly with George White's dancing 
act, occupies the spotlight for a while, 
and so does Worsley. There is one fault 
to be found with the act. Hussey does 
not have enough to do. The audience here 
seemed to want more of him. I. S. 



ROYAL 

The show waa opened , by the now 
famous Breen Family, featuring Nellie 
Breen. The act, billed as a genuine nov- 
elty, succeed*, in part, in living np to its 
(billing. The audience appreciated it im- 
mensely, and applauded generously. 

Helene "Smiles" Davis calls herself 
"The Overseas Girl" and announces that 
she waa the idol of the boys in the 
trenches. We don't blame them for idolis- 
ing her, either! She offers a cycle of 
"type" songs which runs the whole gamut 
of girl types. She sings rather well, baa 
a bundle of personality, a number of 
classy gowns, all of which add to the suc- 
cess of the turn. 

Mile. Diane and Jan Rubinl, this time 
billed as "Sweden's Young Violin Vir- 
tuoso," assisted by Salvatore, who looks 
French despite his Italian name, offered 
their well known musical act, consisting 
of a few songs, a few violin selections and 
several special twists by Mile. Diane. She 
is possessed of a pleasant voice, a large 
pair of eyes and a shapely form, all of 
which she uses to good advantage. They 
scored a large hit and had to take extra 
bows. 

Frank Davis and Delle Darnell, in a 
comedy skit called "Birdseed," followed 
and gained laughs galore. ' Both these 
people are clever, have personality and 
— what* s more — a good vehicle with really 
clever material, which they put across in 
fine style. Davis is supposed to be a 
traveling salesman selling birdseed and 
he tries to sell Miss Darnell some. They 
were forced to take several bows for their 
work. 

"Playmates," a "school" act with five 
girls and one boy, came next. This act is 
entirely musical with the exception of one 
clog dance. It opens with a school number 
and follows with a few lines of talk*. Then 
the boy does his only work in the act, of- 
fering a solo number. The scene then 
changes from a country lane in one to a 
garden in four where a party is being 
given. The party consists of a number 
of specialties. The act went over in 
great shape, each specialty being gener- 
ously applauded. 

Following intermission, and "Topics of 
the Day," the vaudeville was resumed by 
Frank Crummit who did his well known 
comedy singing and talking act. He ac- 
companies himself on the guitar and 
ukelele. His songs were all snappy 
comedy numbers, interspersed with several 
really funny gags. He possesses a pe- 
culiar kind of personality in that he seems 
to radiate good fellowship all the time. 
This accounts for his tremendous bit He 
was forced to respond to enencore. 

Wonder of wonders ! PJrwmg Carus, who 
followed Crummit, has actually succeeded 
in getting thinner. She looks better to- 
day than she did two years ago and she 
has a dandy little act She is accompanied 
on the piano by J. Walter Leopold. She 
uses a lot of political talk to get laughs, 
and succeeds. Some of the speeches are 
a bit lengthy, but the audience did not 
seem to mind that The "dance" song 
came in for four encores, and it looked 
like hard work for her, but she stuck to 
it. At the finish of her act, she waa 
forced to make a little speech which she 
did in a most serious vein, too. 

Brendel and Bert have more laughs 
than ever. Brendel has added several new 
gags and some new steps to the act, and 
they are good ones, too! They had the 
audience laughing uproariously all the 
time. At the finish, after showing about 
a dozen different "fallapart" clothes tricks, 
the audience still wanted more, but it 
seems they had no more to- give. 

Adelaide Hermann, widow of Hermann 
the Great closed the show with a mys- 
tery-magic act that pleased the audience. 
They were generously disposed, and the 
act received many rounds of hearty ap- 
plause. S. K. 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 





RIVERSIDE 

Camilla's Birds, a collection of trained 
cockatoos, opened the show with a well 
arranged routine of tricks executed with 
far more skill than usually seen la offer- 
ings of this kind. 

Stanley and Birnes, like moat number 
two dancing acta devoted a considerable 
portion of their act to songs, rendered 
somewhat poorer than the usual Tool 
efforts of dancing teams. The dancing la 
all that really amounts to anything in this 
act and one or two of the number were 
well received. 

Lee Kohlmar and Co. presented the old 
Clara Sbipman, Sam Shipman act "The 
Two Sweethearts," a little playlet of 
clever lines and good situations. Kohlmar 
lost many opportunities for laughs in the 
piece by hia failure to enunciate clearly, 
a point which was not overlooked, how- 
ever, by Fox, who in a minor role stood 
ont prominently whenever he was on. 

Pat Rooney has taken all of the song 
hits out of the old Rooney and Bent act 
and these with the addition of one or two 
new ones and Joe Santley at the piano is 
doing a single. Rooney sang a half dozen 
or more songs and to each added a dance 
chorus which helped considerably in pat- 
ting them over. Santley, in addition to 
playing the accompaniments sang a 

melodious "Lonesome" number and got a 
big hand at its finish. Rooney recited 
"Friends" to the piano accompaniment 
with a comedy parody for a finish. At 
the act's conclusion he brought on Miss 
Bent for an introduction and announced 
that they would be re-united in the near 
future in a big act now in rehearsal. 

"Kiss Me," a big musical act lavishly 
costumed and artistically mounted, closed 
the first part. The act billed as a musical 
farce, carries a little plot awinring bat 
not strong in originality. The music, 
lyrics and staging are by William Fried- 
lander, who has put the piece on with his 
accustomed skill. The lyrics are clever 
and several of the songs bright and tune- 
ful. A company of fourteen, including a 
Stunning chorus of eight girls present the 
piece. 

After "Topics of the Day," Walter 
Kelly, the Virginia Judge, gave his familiar 
impersonation of the southern justice who 
pronounced jail sentences combined with 
humorous sayings suited to the various 
cases that came before him. Prefacing 
the judge bit Kelly told a number of 
stories far and away the best heard in 
his act in years. The darky story re- 
garding the chronic jaH bird who had 
spent half of his life in jaH and who on 
one short spell of freedom dropped into a 
church for rest, is a gem. The jail bird 
dropped into a seat and looking op at the 
pulpit was amazed to see one of his part- 
ners in crime, another darky who had 
been his prison mate on dozens of occa- 
sions. The preacher glancing down saw 
the jail bird and looking him in the eye 
said "The text of this morning's sermon 
is from the fourth chapter of Jeremiah 
which reads, 'If yon know me, say nothin' 
and I'll see yon later/" 

The Cameron Sisters with Dave Dreyer 
at the piano presented their dance offer- 
ing, a stronger bit of entertainment than 
seen at this boose a number of months 
ago, chiefly due to Dreyer's playing. In 
addition to accompanying the girl's danc- 
ing he rendered several solos while the 
girls were making their "costume changes. 
According to the programme all the music 
of tiie act was written and arranged by 
Dreyer. Possibly he arranged the tunes, 
but most of them are of the published 
variety. "Carolina Sunshine" stood out 
prominently, tile girls sang "Sweeties" 
for the opener and Dreyer gave a good in- 
terpretation of "The Vamp" for one of 
his solos. 

Honer Dickinson and Grade Deagon 
closed the show. The spot was a hard 
one for their quiet but entertaining act, 
yet they held the audience in remarkably 
well and scored a real applause hit at 
the finish. W. V. 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 



( r <i w< i nm d (ram pa<* f and 



») 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued on page* 12 and 14) 



ALHAMBRA 

Will Ferry, in his original contortion 
act, "The Frog," was new to most of the 
patrons of this theatre and caused a sen- 
sation. 

Harry and Grace Ellsworth picked np 
the applause where Ferry left off and also 
gave a very good account of themselves. 
Miss Ellsworth delivered a "coon" song 
and dance that pleased and Ellsworth's 
eccentric proved to be an exceptionally 
good one. The pair work nicely and pre- 
sent a neat appearance. 

William Suiy and Genevieve Houghton 
have a pleasing little turn by Aaron Hoff- 
man, which they handle capably. Miss 
Houghton is an attractive little miss and 
possesses a pleasing personality in ad- 
dition to a nice voice. Solly is a clever 
boy and made the most of the gags which 
the act contained. The pair also offered 
some dancing which was well done. 

Ben Hemic win not have to worry fbr 
new material if the manner in which his 
act was accepted at this boose is to be 
taken as a criterion. For this is Bernie's 
second appearance at this house within 
the past six months with the same act, 
the same gags, and in fact, practically 
the same material from start to finish. 
Vet he fetched laugh after laugh from the 
house. His encore, in which he rendered 
"Over There" in the style of a Jewish 
band, scored a riot. 

Hermine Shone and Jack Denny and 
Company have an offering that starts off 
with a promise of being something ont of 
the ordinary, but fizzles down to the medi- 
ocre Style of "hokum" act towards the 
latter half of the offering. The opening 
shows Denny and Miss Shone, arguing 
with two classic musicians on the merits 
of jass music in comparison to classic. 
They invite them to see their act at the 
theatre. The next scene is supposed to 
be their act going on in the theatre, after 
a discordant overture by the orchestra pur- 
posely played as such. The two classic 
musicians seat themselves in a box in the 
audience and pass remarks daring the per- 
formance for comedy purposes.— They 
could take this same idea and work op 
better gagB and find it to their advantage. 
Another girl, as a Chinese maid, also as- 
sists by shimmying. 

Regal and Moore, two men, opened the 
second half with a variety and acrobatic 
turn of merit. They open with a burlesque 
on a general vaudeville bill and do some 
singing and dancing. They than give an 
exhibition of strong-man work, in comedy 
manner, that is very well done. A few 
songs are also included here. 

Irene Bordoni and Lieut. Gitz-Bice 
started their offering with an announce- 
ment by Gits-Rice that Hiss Bordoni was 
handicapped by the delay in the arrival of 
her trunks, bat would appear. Despite 
this announcement, Miss Bordoni did not 
seem to lack for costumes. Miss Bordoni 
sang her songs with her usual charm and 
scored a very large amount of applause. 
Gitz-Bice, also, was received nicely with 
his songs and piano work. 

Fallon and Brown have added a lot of 
new gags to their offering since the writer 
has last reviewed them, and every one of 
them ia sore-fire. The boys handle their 
material excellently and the audience could 
not get enough of them. Jim Fallon is a 
dandy comedian and. as a straight, Boss 
Brown is "all there." 

It was as late as ten minutes after 
eleven when Hubert Kinney and Oorrinne 
went on with their dancing act, with 
Tom Tucker at the piano. The act is 
nicely staged, and the darning very grace- 
ful and pleasing. There were quite a 
few walk-outs owing to the lateness of 
the boor, bat those who stayed gave the 
act its full share of applause. The offer- 
ing is easily worthy of a better position. 

G. J. H. 



EIGHTY-FIRST STREET 

"The Sculptor's Garden," a finely 
mounted posing act, occupies the initial 
spot. There are six different tableaux, 
in which -four people and two dogs ap- 
pear. Posted on a placard are the names 
of toe tableaux, and unlike many other 
notices of the sort, these are quite dis- 
tinct and can easily be read from all 
parts of the house. "At the Fountain" is 
the title of the opening study, after which 
come "Vanity," "Life and Death," 
"Diana," "Memory," "Music and Echo" 
and "Justice, Liberty and Peace," in the 
order named. 

Walter Clinton and Julia Rooney are 
presenting their "After Dark" offering, 
which includes some excellent rt«nci^ g and 
acceptable singing, but which has a few 
poor features. One of the latter is some 
of the patter which is used. Toward the 
end, the gag about coming from Tonkers, 
a foreign country, is sprang and. of course, 
it doesn't get a laugh. There are one or 
two other bits just as old and they should 
by all means be discarded for new mate- 
rial. Julia Rooney is a graceful dansense, 
and- Clinton also dances well. They are 
a likable pair, and, with the talk hot 
stered up, will have a first rate act. 

Ed GaBagher and Joe Rolley, in "The 
Battle of Whatstheuse" have an offering 
that abounds in clever ' bits, excellently 
handled. Rolley, in blackface, is uproar- 
iously funny and Gallagher, who now 
sports a mustache, holds bis part of the 
work np efficiently. The end of the war 
has affected most soldier acts unfavorably 
bat Gallagher and Rolley still get laughs 
in profusion with theirs. 

William Gaxton and Company in "The 
Junior Partner," a comedy sketch by 
Rupert Hughes, will hold the interest of 
any audience. The playlet, in itself, is 
hardly an exception to the usual run of 
vaudeville playlets, but Gaxton's pleasing 
personality and good acting place it in 
the hit class. The rest of the cast, two 
men and two women, the latter having 
very little to do, perform creditably. The 
story tells of a young man, Jepson by 
name, who has lived in luxury for some 
time and, one day finds himself finan cially 
embarrassed. There are numerous bills 
to be paid and he faces being ejected from 
his apartment as well as having all of 
the furnishings of his home taken by 
creditors. A friend of college days, Bas- 
se tt, calls and remarks that he owes Jep- 
son $900. The information is given. in a 
manner that suggests the return of the 
debt, bat Basse tt further remarks that 
another loan of $100 would make it an 
even $1,000. Bassett ia in just as sad a 
plight as Jepson. The two then concoct 
a plan whereby they can interest a certain 
Mr. Dinwiddie, an old and wealthy chap, 
in a project of theirs. They succeed, and 
the old fellow agrees to finance a railroad 
venture which bids fair to prove success- 
ful, with the result that both are relieved, 
for Dinwiddie binds his bargain by giving 
Jepson two $500 bills. 

Charles Irwin has an entertaining sin- 
gle, which includes a souse number at 
the start, some talk in rhyme and then a 
song. Irwin has some clever material, 
there being included in his act several 
anecdotes that are really humorous. He 
handles all of his material capably and 
holds down his position on the bill in an 
easy manner. The prohibition rhyme 
which he uses at the dose is not par- 
ticularly clever and could be omitted to 
advantage. 

Mile Rhea, assisted by Joseph Mack, 
Jr., and Walter Burke, one of whom 
plays the violin while the other sings, 
offers a terpsichorean act that makes a • 
satisfactory closing to the vaudeville por- 
tion of the show. It is nicely staged and 
well presented. LS. 



BRONSON AND BIZZO 

Theatre — Yonken. 

Style — Singing and In$trumental. 
Tune — Fourteen Minute t. 
Setting— In One. 

Bronson and Bino are two neat- 
appearing young men who work in 
Tuxedos. They open with a song about 
the methods through which various en- 
tertainers make money and do one or 
two imitations. This opening bit needs 
speeding up. . . 

Following the song a piano is polled 
out and one of toe two plays and *""f 
He has a pleasing voice and introduces 
the other, who enters with a violin. 
Some jazz and ballads follow and are 
played well . The pianist renders a solo 
in which he sings a "Laddie" ballad 
nicel y. 

. The boys have personality and handle 
their material well. With a little more 
to their offering in the way of speed, 
they should find the better booses easy 
going. g. J. H. 

THE CORINTHIANS 

Theatre— Eightg-fint Street. 
Style — Singing. 
Toot— Fifteen minutes. 
Setting— In three (special). • 

Three women and three men make up 
the company. All of them have good 
voices which harmonize pleasingly. 

The act Is made up of special numbers 
rendered with one leading and the com- 
pany assisting. Each member takes a 
torn at leading. The company has the 
voices to make np a good act, hot as a 
whole the numbers can be rated as "not 
so good." 

A little veatriloquial business is in- 
jected through what is programed as a 
violin solo by one of the girls but which 
is supposed to be a vocal imitation of 
the violin. One of the men of the com- 
pany also offers imitations of chickens. 

With a better routine of good songs 
the sextette should find toe better houses 
easy going. But the present act will do 
for the small time only. G. J. H. 



RENN-CUNNINGHAM TWINS 

Theatre— Proctor' s Fifty-eighth Street. 

Style — Singing, dancing, patter. ' 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Two pretty little girls and a very 
short young man constitute this trio. 
They have the makings of a good act, 
but it is spoiled entirely by the patter. 
There are hardly any gags that do not 
date back before they were born, 
"j They also deliver one or two songs 
and, while their voices are not extraor- 
dinary, they render them pleasingly. 
The best part of the offering is the 
dancing, which should be worked op 
more. 

G. J. H. 



ANTHONY 

Theatre— Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Whittling and accordeon. 

Time — Nine minvtet. 

Setting — In erne. 

Anthony has a short routine of num- 
bers, three of which he whistles. AH 
axe well selected and were rendered 
very nicely. The whistling sounds as 
if it were done with a concealed instru- 
ment in his mouth, bat,. whether it is 
or not, the - melodious sound produced 
is very pleasing. . He would do well to 
add a few more numbers to the accor- 
deon «nd" of the offering, for' he dis- 
played ability in his closing number on 
that instrument. The turn should get 
plenty of work on the three-a-day 
route. ' G. J. H. 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



n 




AMERICAN 

_ . (La»t Half) 

It Is seldom that a staging and Instru- J 
mental act U keen la the opening position at 
?b" bouse, and when anch is found the act 
SIS finds the going dlfflcnlt *£"•*■& 
SJvJkl Bird, an" Hawaii"- moat be given credit 
for recelvin* unusually big applause. 

Herman and Clifton followed with a song 
offering of a different type and pleased with 
tbdrdngiiig. Dnt did not help the offering 
in the least with their patter, of which, for- 
tunately, there was only a little. 

Following an O. Henry film. Ubby and 
Nelson pot over a great many thrills wit* a 
number of feata on radons sizes and atylea 

° f Taylor and Francis, man and woman, the 
latter being an attractive little miss, have 
«>me fairly good gags in their patter, which 
tbey delivered well. They also offered oneor 
two song numbers and a dance which pleased. 
•The Love Race." a musical tab featuring 
lack Hallen. has two other leads, a girl and 
a man. and a chorus of five. It causes no 
rioT of ^plsnse, and did not vary In the 
,eaat from the usual run or mediocre small 
time tabs. The leads and the chorus both do 
their work fairly well, but the offering Itself 
requires a lot of revision. 

Rose Garden opened with a "Landlord" 
nnmber, and then offered a number of bur- 
lesquea at the piano which were greatly over- 
done and should be toned down. She sings 
fairly well, bnt could use her voice to better 
advantage by not trying to be a comedienne, 
for she is not of that type. 

"Salvation Molly." a sketch of the San 
Francisco underworld, proved to be really 
entertaining. The cast, which consists oi 
two men and a woman, do their work excel- 
lently. The offering la truly the old-style 
melodrama, with white-slayers and the^halr- 
ralalng stunts of Chinatown, which brings 
back memories of the old dramas of the 

Bowery theatres. . .. . • 

Harry Antrim has a very small-time open- 
ing coming from the audience, after whistl- 
ing in the house. He has a number of gags, 
some of which are good, but didn't get over, 
and a great many of which are veterans. He 
also Includes some Imitations In his rouUne, 
which are fair. °- *• H - 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(Continued from pago* B ami It) 



METROPOLITAN * PROCTOR'S 125TH STREET 



KEENEY'S 

(Last Half) 



Lulu Coates and Crackerjacks opened the 
show with a song and dance act that re- 
ceived the plandita of the audience. The 
singing of Miss Coates was rasping and most 
unpleasant to the ear. Her *anctng was 
much better. The three boys with her did 
some neat fast-etepplng that went over well. 
The burlesque bit by the one working In 
blackface was vulgar In spots and should be 
changed. 

The best things In Dave Thursby s act were 
the Hobo opening and the quick change. Its 
a shame to waste such good material, and 
Thursby should get some more of the tramp 
stuff. The folks liked the tramp nnmber im- 
mensely and showed it by their applause. The 
act, after the change, waa much too slow 
and uninteresting. The finish was almost a 

flop. - -_ 

Ethel Mae Hall and a company of two 
men offered a comedy sketch that Is a com- 
bination of both good and bad material. The 
comedy. In parts, is very old and tlmeworn. 
The sketch has to do with a married woman 
who U annoyed by mashers and whose hus- 
band will do nothing In the matter. Bo she 
hires a plumber, who has entered her house 
by mistake, to aet as her husband for a 
while, and tells him to give the first masher 
that enters the house a beating. Her hus- 
band enters and Is the recipient of a 
thorough pummeling. The ending of the 
sketch Is very weak. When the plumber 
discovers that It Is her husband, ho merely 
mumbles "Gee, It's the wrong guy- 

Will and Mary Rogers have a song ana 
talk act that la no different from the 
hundreds of others on the vaudeville stage. 
They are supposed to be a husband and wife 
who have been separated for a long time. 
Tbey finally kiss and make up and everything 
ends with a song and dance. They scored a 
large hit and had to take an encore. 

Nelson and Cronln closed the show with a 
singing act that was handicapped because 
both had bad colds. They tried hard, how- 
ever, and got away with a good sized hit. 
Their songs are all or the popular variety. 

"Home," with Mildred Harris, was the 
feature picture. s - K - 



Morlen has a short routine of numbers 
which he offers on the accordeon, but his act 
is timed nicely and gets him off to a good 

Cooper and Henderson, two men in black- 
face, stsrted with some chatter. The gags 
contained In thla can be judged by this one . 
"Twelve months from today, youU be dead 
one year." The others are Just aa weak ana 

aB The best part of the offering is the sing- 
ing, for the men possess good voices. Some 
yodeling on the style that was originated 
by Eddie Leonard's company some time ago, 
sent them off to a big hand. 

The Four Hays have a very pretty setting 
In full stage and offered a cycle of songs. 
The four consist of three women, who oo 
the singing, and one young man, who accom- 
panies on the plnno. Their singing la very 
pleaalng. for their voices harmonize pleas- 
antly. The young man, who alngs a few lines 
In one number, would do weU to raise his 
voice a bit for the words sre hard to eaten. 
The girls can omit the dancing bit from one 
number, for their ability in that line is doubt- 
ful. As a singing act. however, the turn Is 

^Huytar'and Bann. the latter formerly of 
Bard and Bann, are doing most of the ma- 
terial that was employed In Ba/d and j»a£nB 
act, with the addition of a lot of new gags. 
Bann stiH takes off the part of a T»ance, 
and does it well. To give the duo credit, 
they have a good "hokum" act, but there Is 
absolutely no need of one piece of business In 
the dance at the close of the act. It la such 
bits which Injure the good name of the stage 
and of the people belonging to It. 

EUls and Irwin, In their well-known sing- 
ing offering, took their usual big hand. The 
men hive voices that contain a volume of 
power. One of th»n> was a bit handicapped 
by a cold, but, despite that, sang welL The 
other, the baritone, is doing a lot of Ha- 
ding" in the act, of late, which. to of doubtful 

value. ' , m " 

Seymour Brown and Company closed the 
show with a musical tab. Thla turn la really 
out of the ordinary run of the threa-a-day 
girl acts, for although it possesses an old 
plot, the story does not lack In Interest, and 
Is brought out In good fashion. G. J. H. 



VICTORIA 

(Last Half) 
Emma and Carl FraJbel cavorted cheerily, 
gracefully and entertainingly on a slack wire 
and what they lacked In daring they made 
up for in the ease with which they flitted to 
and fro. , _- __'._ 

Jerome and Albright are a couple Of men 
who opened rather weakly, judging from tie 
amount of applauae they received after the 
finish of their first song. But, as they con- 
tinued, esch playing the piano alternately the 
while the other sang, their stock rose until, 
at the end, finishing with the "Hesitation 
Blues" number, they received the lusty 
plaudits their efforts had aroused. 

Betty Eldred la assisted by a man desig- 
nated In the billing as "Company." And he 
Is no whit less entertaining than herself. 
The setting to rustic and 'theirs to a hinter- 
land musical offering that has to do with 
songs which she sings in a rather shrill but 
not unpleasant voice, to a whistling accom- 
paniment beautifully rendered by him. He 
also Imitated birds and other barnyard crea- 
tures, and, in the main, assisted ably in 
Betty Eldred's act, which is a good one. > 
Anthony and Boss sre a couple of Italian 
dialect comedlana who are not startllngly 
artlHtlc as such. But, nevertheless, they msn- 
sged to srouse laughter with their patter. 
Tbelr manner of working to nice, but the 
material in their offering sounds, at times, 
rather antiquated. With their present offer- 
ing they are eminently suited to the circuit 
over which they are now working ; but. In 
the big time houses they probably wouldn t 
be nearly as successful. ' 

Boudlnl and Bernard, In the closing spot 
on the bill, were' deserving of a much better, 
position, aa such things . are figured by per- 
formers. For this man and lady are. a couple 
of accomplished accordlan players who proved 
their musicianship by running the gamut of 
tunes from classical to popular syncopation, 
all ot which they rendered delightfully on 
their Ticcordians. That tbey are headed for 
the two-a-day houses Is quite evident, judg- 
ing from the approval they achieved at this 
one. '.*..' M. Li A. 



(Last Half) 
The audiences on Friday afternoon was 
given enough singing acts to last them for 
a mighty long time, and yet, curious to state, 
they did not seem to tire of the constant vo- 
cal efforts. - . 
The Two Yaquls, who looked and dressed 
Uke the Indians of the tribe by that name, 
opened with singing. See New Acta. 

Karl Karney offered a neat planologuc. It 
will be reviewed under New Acts. 

Thos_L. Garrett did some hypnotising, and 
went fairly well. New Acta. 

The Italian Trio, all men, offered a numoer 
of operatic arias. They will be found unner 
New Acts. . ., _ . 

Robert Carlson also sang In a deep bass 
and bored the audience with some patter. 
New Acts. 

* Alfred FarreU and Company did their art 
rag-picking aet and pleased with It. The act 
la a novelty and well presented. Even In 
this act, the woman sang one number. 

Harcourt, assisted by a young man for 
comedy purposes, did an act on the style of 
WUlard. in which he exhibited a freak body, 
being able to Increase his height and the 
length of his limbs, at will. See New Acta. 
Maggie Le Clair and Company presented 
their pleasing comedy sketch of aeparated 
lovers and took many laughs and a lot of ap- 
plause. The turn to handled well by a cap- 
able cast and has a number ot good lines. 

Dotson is one colored boy who sure can 
shake a mean "hoof." He also did a bit In 
the singing line. But the dancing Is the 
feiture^f the turn and is full of life. He 
took two encores and then almost stopped 

Murray Vogt and Company again show 
their versatility in billing. At this house 
they were billed as Murry ?. The question 
mark is not an error, but part of the billing. 
The duo has added new songs and sings them 
weU. The comedy Is of the small time calibre 
and pleased this bunch, who always eat up 
"hokum." . m __ 

Tracey and Wahl offered a number of Tra- 
cey's songs and scored one of the big hits of 

the blU. . * 

BUly McDermot, the tramp comedian, 

closed the show and held them In. 

The bill was an all-round great song re- 

ra - O. 3. H. 



HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

A ly la phone, the .-notes' of . which did not 
always ring true, marred George Buck's suc- 
cess in thei opening . spot. He would have 
found the going easier, however. If tha house 
orchestra had helped him over the rough 
spots. 

Buck plsys the xylsphone rather well, how- 
ever, and Is particularly good in the num- 
bers that he syncopates. The planologue por- 
tion has the foundation of success, but the 
structure has to be bolstered up consider- 
ably and changed from Its present form. 
Buck received a fairly good hand in the open- 
ing position. 

The story of a couple of divorcees formed 
the basis for the playlet presented by Philips 
and Eby, which will be further reviewed 
under New Acts. 

In view of the sure-fire material that 
Leonard and WUlard posses* and the expert 
way In which they send it across, the third 
spot to rather an early, one for them. Almost 
every line the girl read was a laugh-provoker. 
and, though some of the stuff to more than 
a trifle risque, it is put over so adeptly that 
It Is not vulgar. 

Bert Howard, In an effort to open origin- 
ally, succeeded only In slowing up the start 
of his act, but gained speed with his talk 
about sentiment, and won considerable ap- 
plause with hto piano playing, the mualc-box 
bit being particularly well liked. 

Mack and Earl present an act with a num- 
ber of specially written songs, of which the 
first "Please Don't Fallow Me." Is the best. 
making a corking good opener that set! a 
pace lor the act that It to difficult to keep 
throughout. The byword of the pair Is, evi- 
dently, "Pep," but, after the breathless prom- 
enade that la so well done In the first num- 
ber, the girl has done enough walking around 
the stage, and It would help matters If she 
would calm down a hit for the rest of the 
act so far aa walking around to concerned. 
The Eight Black Dots gave some real 
Darktown harmony which pleased, although 
the dancing was far ahead of the singing. 

H. J.Q. 



FOX'S STAR 

(Last Half) 

'Friday evening hi « neighborhood holi- 
day at thla theatre and the house was 
crowded to absolute capacity. 

"Evangeline," the feature picture, had a 
lot to do with packing them In. 

Norman and Jeanette started the vaude- 
ville portion of the bill, with a banjo "Fren- 
chle" number by the male member of the 
team, while the lady sang and danced. Her 
voice waa fair and her dancing poor. She 
then tried a violin solo, but failed to win the 
bouse. Her partner followed with a medley 
of classical numbers of various national com- 
posers, ranging from Hungarian, Russian and 
Italian to the Irish and American. He 
played quite well. He then accompanied with 
bis instrument while the young lady played 
the violin and danced. The last number got 
the couple off nicely. 

Hart and Lowrie are two very neat appear- 
ing boys who stood head and shoulders above 
the rest of the acts. The boys offered some 
singing, and took the biggest hand of the 
bin. See New Acta. 

Moore and Dunn, a young man and a girl, 
offered a lot of patter and a bit of singing. 
This pair should do an act on the style of 
Laurie and Bronson, for they are of that 
type. The best psrt of their offering was In- 
cluded In the closing dance, which they did 
very welL Their present act will never get 
them far, for it drags considerably. 

.Owsley and O'Day, man and woman, also 
offered some patter, singing and dancing. 
The dancing, which was done on*a mat, in 
clog style,' was well done, but the same can- 
not be said about the singing and patter. In 
fact the -pair would do weU to work out a 
straight routine of dancing. 

"In- the Trenches." with five: men and a 
woman closed the show. The skit consists 
of patter, shooting, and some singing, but 
waa only a fair closer. G. 3- H. 



FIFTH AVENUE 

(Last Half) 

The bill as presented on Thursday was 

much too lona; and dragged, particularly be- 
cause of one act which ran for about, an 
hour. 

The Burns Brothers opened with sn act 
that included some band-to-hand llfta, whirls, 
and other feats of strength, fairly well done 
but Including nothing that other acts have 
not attempted. 

Clinton and Rooney sang, danced and 
talked for a while. The dancing waa excel- 
lent and the singing also met with approval, 
but the talk Included too many trite bits to 
make it funny. Clinton should omit certain 
blta of patter which he uses. Otherwise, the 
turn measures up to big time standards. 

Shelton Brooks and Company scored a bit 
of proportions with some singing, dancing 
and work on the piano and clarinet Every- 
thing they did was devoured with relish by 
the crowd, snd the team took an encore, after 
which Brooks delivered a curtain speech In 
which he referred to Tonkers as a foreign 
country. He should stop using that old gag. 
The Junior Mimic World, with a Bock of 
youthful damsels and a comedian who may 
have been a Hebrew or Dutch character im- 
personator^ occupied about an hour on the 
boards. The girls started with an ensemble 
number, after which there were solos and 
doable songs, ancient gags, new gaga that 
were not very funny, and Imitations of stage 
celebrities whose names were not announced, 
so that few knew who or what was being 
imitated. After the act is cut considerably 
It will do aa a flash for the small time. Aa 
It stands. It was a long wait from the open- 
ing until the end. 

Jimmy Flynn and Mabel Burke were both 
applauded for their renditions of old snd 
new songs. 

' George M. Bosener, in an act that Included 
Impersonations of various characters, held 
the Interest of the audience. 

Zella Nevada had a difficult spot but made 
a great effort and scored a big hit. Flaring 
her so far down on the program was a great 
injustice to her. See "New Acts" for a re- 
view of the offering. 

Jimmy Lucas, assisted by Jo* Hall. In hto 
"Ravings of 1910." got several laughs. The 
act would be funnier, however. If Lucas would 
refrain from singing in the Jewish language. 
The Lorner Girls closed with a song and 
dance act, in which they did some good 
work. ■ ■ L 8. 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 





ANDERSON AND YVEL 

Theatre— I'roctofs 58 (A St. 

Style — SoOer £%«<<«#■ 

Time — Eight Minute*. 

Setting— /» Four. 

Anderson and Yvel, man and woman, 
have a roller skating' act in which they 
display good form and a few interesting 
stunts, of which one stands out as the 
feature. Their work is done in a clean- 
cat manner, but there is a lack of spec- 
tacular stunts. 

The torn, as it is at present, is some- 
what short. The closing number by the 
man, a sort of burlesque on an Egyptian 
dance, does not make a particularly good 
cosing, for the reason that so many per- 
formers have given similar numbers, off 
the skates, to be ■are, bat similar, never- 
theless. 

They started with a waltz on skates, 
after which the girl went off stage, and 
the man, wearing a derby hat and 
smoking a cigar a la Frisco, did a few 
whirls on one foot and a few other 
stunts. The feature of the act was then 
offered when the man, holding his partner 
by one hand and one foot, whirled her 
about at a high rate of speed. The drop 
was lowered after that, as though indi- 
cating the Enish of the act. But die 
girl stepped forward in one and an- 
nounced that her partner was also a 
skilful dancer and would offer a terpsi- 
chorean number. The drop was then 
raised and he did his burlesque on. the 
skates. The number did not arouse very 
much laughter and, as a comedy effort, 
was not a success. The rest of the act 
was much better. 

With another good tttJUJBSj stunt in- 
stead of the dance farce to close with, 
the turn will be improved. I. S. 



ROSE AND MOON CO. 

Theatre — Audubon. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — FuU stage (special). 

The one outstanding feature of this act. 
which will constantly draw the attention 
of anyone who views it is the excellent 
taste with which the musical numbers 
have been selected and arranged both 
for the solos and dances. The pianist 
who renders thera is also worthy of some 
billing, for he is as good as any of the 
big time pianists. 

Rose and Moon are a likeable couple 
and have arranged their dance bits 

artistically. All of the dances are of the 
clog type, but they have arranged a -.um- 
ber of eccentric steps which put them 
above the clog-dancers «tho generally 
open a show on the small time. 

They open with a clog waltz in which 
they syncopate the minnette. Then there 
are a few eccentric numbers of the jazz 
type and two on the Oriental style. The 
two dance well and have a capable 
assistant in their pianist, who renders 
two solos. The act should do for the 
better class houses. G. J. H. 



REN ARD AND JORDAN 

Theatre — Keency's. 

Style — Comedy. 

Time — Eighteen Minutes. 

Setting— One, Special. 

This is the same act that Renard did 
before with a male partner, when it was 
known as Regan and Renard. 

The setting represents the lobby of a 
hotel with a magazine stand in the fore- 
ground. Renard is the bellboy and clerk 
of the hotel, and Miss Jordan is a guest. 
The talk, which is funny, concerns hotel 
matters in general, and is bound to 
bring laughs. 

Both people handle their material 
nicely, and Miss Jordan has a pleasing 
voice, which she uses to good advantage. 
The act should find no trouble in getting 
plenty of work anywhere. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 



(Continued on pag* 14) 



FRISCO TRIO 

Theatre — Greenpoint. . 
Style — Comedy Act. 
Time — Twenty Minutes. 
Setting—/n One. 

This act needs, among >8#6ftWfah<< 
some new comedy. The men are excel- 
lent dancers and sing fairly well. Bat 
their comedy material is rather anti- 
quated. » 

They open with a song and follow with 
a'few steps. They then indulge in some 
cross-fire that has seen usage before and 
follow with an acrobatic dance by the 
smaller of the three. A comedy "wed- 
ding" number with one of them as a 
bride, follows. This bit is not as good 
as it is intended to be. They then close 
with a bit in which all three of them 
bang on the piano until two hands enter 
and pull the instrument off. They finish 
with dancing in which they partially 
disrobe. This bit got one or two laughs. 
The smallest of the three appeared, to 
the writer, to be made np rather ama- 
teurishly. 

If the act secured some new comedy 
material and snapped it over a fit faster, 
they would get along much better. They 
will, however, find no trouble in getting 
along on the better small time as a 
feature act. Also, they have an asset 
in their name. S. K. 



ALLEN AND BETTY LEIBER 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 
Style— Playlet. 
Time — Twenty-five Minutes. 
Setting — In Four. 

The idea around which this act is 
built has been employed so often and so 
repeatedly that it is almost impossible 
to pat a new wrinkle in it. The two 
players try hard, bnt their success is 
rather shabby. 

The story, shows a young married 
couple who must part, due to the hus- 
band's being called to Russia on business. 
There is the usual parting scene. The 
stage grows dark and the audience is 
informed that six months has passed. 

The husband then comes home unex- 
pectedly to find his wife not at home. 
He at once grows suspicions. She comes 
in attired in evening dress and he begins 
to upbraid her, distorting her every re- 
mark. He finally shows her a cable he 
received, which reads, "Would advise 
you to come home at once, as your wife 
has no less than three fellows at the 
house in the last month." 

The wife, though, explains that she 
had been ill and that her life was saved 
only through the arrival of Tom, Dick 
and Harry. He at once wants to kill 
them. She then discloses the fact that 
Tom, Dick and Harry are his sons and 
he sinks down into a crair exclaiming, 
"I'm glad I didn't stay away a year." 

S. K. 



ZELLA SISTERS 
Theatre — routers. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Ten Minutes. 
Setting— FuU Stage. 

These sisters are two attractive girls 
with cropped hair. They have a routine 
of dances, opening with a number by 
both and followed by a rope jumping 
effort and an eccentric number. They 
close with a dance by the two. 

While what dancing the girls do is 
well done, is is nothing ont of the ordi- 
nary. At present they will do for the 
three- a-day. - G. J. H. 



VERA CALHOUN 

Theatre — Jersey City. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Ten minutes. 

Setting — Special. ' ■ 

"The Girl in the Frame," as Vera 
Calhoun is billed, is a novel singing act 
which should be able to occupy a posi- 
tion in the better small time houses and 
some of those on the big time. She is 
an attractive girl, has a. pleasing per- 
sonality and renders her selections with 
intelligence and in a clear voice. She 
was given the opening position at this 
house and, in the initial spot,' scored 
solidly. In a lower spot, the applause 
would probably have been greater, for 
the audience was not yet entirely seated 
when she went on. Nor was it yet in a 
very receptive state of mind. 

Miss Calhoun works before a screen 
on which are flashed different colored 
scenes. In her closing number she is 
seated upon a sort of ball which, by a 
mechanical device, floats about like a 
planet before a light effect representing 
cloudy skies. 

Following a few explanatory words, 
Miss Calhoun, attired in the costume of 
a shepherdess, sang a ballad comment- 
ing on the freedom of Ireland. Her next 
selection, in a bathing costume, was 
liked, as was her closing number, on the 
moving sphere, which was Harry Oar- 
roll's Rainbow song. I. S. 



MAGEE AND ANNETTE 

Theatre — Greenpoint. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting— FuU stage. 

This act ranks with any of the good 
dancing acts on the better small time. 
Both performers are graceful and ac- 
complished dancers. The offering is ap- 
propriately costumed and well presented. 
They open with a Scotch folk gong 
which might as well be eliminated for, 
although Magee is a good, dancer, his 
singing will not do. This is followed by 
a gracefully executed Highland Fling by 
Annette, after which Magee did a Sail- 
or's Hornpipe, interloping a few eccentric 
steps. Annette, dressed in a becoming 
country kid's costume, did a "skipping 
the rope" dance which is a sure fire 
applause getter, and Magee followed 
with a Chinese number in costume to 
match. Annette, also costumed as an 
Oriental, joined him, and they concluded 
with two semi-waltz numbers, the latter 
being of the whirlwind variety. 8. K. 



KINNEY AND WHITE 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th St. 

Style— Dancing. 

Time — Fourteen Minute*. 

Setting— In Three {Special). 

Kinny and White have a pretty little 
dancing torn which will eventually make 
the better houses, but needs a little more 
smoothness than it possesses at present. 
Kinny starts the offering in one, en- 
tering with a number of bundles in his 
arms and a song about shopping. A long 
ribbon from one of the buildings drags 
off into the wings. He pulls the ribbon 
and at the other end of it is Miss White 
in a hat-box costume. Following a song 
and dance by the pair, the setting goes 
to three, where she dons a new dress. 
A dance by the two in waltz time fol- 
lows. White then does an eccentric 
dance in which he features kicking. A 
toe-dance by the girl and a "mask" dance 
by the two complete the offering. 

Both dance welL Kinny is very light 
and graceful and the girl is a capable 
partner. G. J. H. 



NAT JEROME AND CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd St. 

Style — Comedy Playlet. 

Time — Eighteen Minute*. 

Setting — Full Stage. 

Whenever a performer wants to appeal 
to the personal feelings of an audience, 
nowadays, he either sings a song to the 
Irish or the Jews. Usually be gets 
away with it, for the Irish applaud the 
Irish, the Jews applaud themselves and 
they applaud each other. And when a 
performer makes a hit with both factions, 
he is in clover, for these two seem to 
run things nowadays and the rest just 
string along, Nat Jerome has done just 
that. He has in his act a quarrel in a 
family composed of an Irish girl and a 
Jewish youth and, finally, a re-union. 

The vehicle, in itself, has not been 
written very well. The plot is one that 
affords a few possibilities although not 
very many. It is a theme that can best 
be built np by having clever bits of 
dialogue included, rather than upon 
thrTHing situations. At present, it has 
neither. The characters play their roles 
fairly well and the girl who has the 
part of the young wife is attractive. 
The playlet, however, in addition to its 
faults, is continued far beyond its 
climax. It should be curtailed. Moot 
of the act at present consists of talk 
that does not appear to get anywhere. 
The offering isn't exciting, nor is it 
funny. But it will do on the small time, 
because it will please the folks from the 
Green Isle and the Hebrews. 

Mary and Sammy have quarreled. 
Mary has forced her husband to sign 
separation papers. It is evident that 
he loves the girl, bat she insists that 
they separate. In comes the girl's 
mother, and upon finding that her 
daughter is to leave Sammy, she tries 
to smooth the matter out, Sammy's 
father comes in. He and Mrs. Ryan, 
for that is the name of the girl's mother, 
have a verbal battle in which Mrs. Ryan 
displays a sharp tongue. It is then 
discovered that the reason for the 
quarrel is that the couple, after being 
married for five years, could not decide 
whether to raise their children in the 
Jewish faith or as Erin's youths are 
brought up. The young man explains 
that he would not have objected, but 
that he had thought his father did not 
approve of his wife's stand. The parents 
reunite the children, each of whom agrees 
to give in a bit. Mrs. Ryan invites the 
other three characters to dinner and 
the act ends when the young man's 
father remarks that he will go as far 
as to eat ham. I . S. 



YANKEE FOUR 

Theatre— Proctors 125JJI St. 

Style — Singing. 

Time — Tioelve minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

This quartet does not style itself a 
"comedy" four. For this, alone these 
men are to be congratulated. 

The men enter and get right down to 
business and stick to it throughout the 
entire time they are on stage. And they 
certainly can teach a lot of these so- 
called self-styled "comedy-fours" a good 
deal about singing. 

One of the men is not young, being 
possessed of a bald head and a rim of 
gray hair around 'the shiny spot. Two 
are middle-aged and one gives the ap- 
pearance of a man in his early twenties. 
All wear tuxedos, but there are two who 
would do well to get tighter fitting suits, 
as they resemble waiters in a Hungarian 
restaurant. 

But to give them due credit, they cer- 
tainly can sing! They offered a few 
numbers, one without the orchestra ac- 
companiment, which was excellent. With 
more To their act, this quartet can fill 
en early spot on the big time. G. J. H. 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




F«oM !» ItB Vr Tnmk 
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Orltnd W. v'suRhsn President and Secretary 

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Telephone Bryant 6117-4118 

ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 

Paul C. Sweinhart, Managing Editor 



New York, September 17, 1919 



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THE NEW CLUB 

Now that the S. Rankin Drew Post of 
the American Legion has received its 
charter and become firmly established, 
Broadway welcomes another theatrical 
club into its fold. 

This newest association of theatrical 
men should, in time, become one of the 
most powerful and respected organizations 
of its kind. In its membership, to a great 
extent, is younger Broadway, and men 
who, in war time, had the stamina and 
backbone to do their bit in successfully 
heating the Hun. They are made of the 
stuff that cannot fail, and should be able 
to succeed in whatever reasonable project 
they undertake. Banded together through 
a common tie, these men have a firmer 
basis upon which to build their founda- 
tion than has, the average theatrical club 
that springs up in the White Light dis- 
trict. 

The Drew Post has not been organized, 
however, for the purpose of flaunting the 
flag nor for the influence it might be able 
to wield, but rather to bring together 
Broadway's American manhood that each 
might be enabled to enjoy the aid and 
companionship of his brothers. 

All men who are eligible for member- 
ship in the Drew Post should make an 
effort to join. There is no reason why 
Broadway should not be able to boast of 
the finest and most representative Post in 
the entire American Legion. Just as the 
theatre and its kindred fields were sources 
of pride to all connected with them when 
our country sounded its call for men, so 
now should the theatrical branch of the 
American Legion tower head and shoul- 
ders above all others. 

In naming the post after Lieutenant S. 
Rankin Drew, who bravely died in his 
country's service, the organization is per- 
petuating the name of one who bore the 
love and respect of all fellow-Thespians, 
and is leaving a lasting reminder that 
jolly, care-free Broadway did not fail 
when the nation needed men. 

Many a battle will be fought over again 
around the tables of Keen's Chop House 
where the Post is meeting, for the time 
being. Many a yarn will be spun about 
"who won the war?" when press-agents 
and actors become reminiscent, and, as 



the years go on, the stories will probably 
become more real and more harrowing and 
be replete with added details. And when 
this younger Broadway gives way finally 
to a newer generation, its clubhouse, now 
being contemplated, will serve as a monu- 
ment and reminder to younger blood that 
those of the amusement world responded 
in a great crisis, as Broadway will always 
respond, \ 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Louis E. Cooke was general agent of the 
Barnum & Bailey Circus. 

'lOff the Earth" was produced at Mil- 
waukee with Eddie Foy, Sadie MacDon- 
ald, Kate Uart, Louise Montague, Lillian 
Hawthorne and Hallen Mostyn in the 
cast. 

"Old Glory," by Chas. T. Vincent and 
Wm. A. Brady, was produced at Boston. 

The Orpheum, Portland, Ore., was 
opened by Gustav Walter as one of the 
houses now composing the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit. 

Augustus Thomas was under contract 
to furnish plays for A. M. Palmer's Stock 
Company. 

Francis Wilson appeared in "The Devil's 
Deputy" at Abbey's Theatre, New York, 
supported by J. C. Meron, Adele Ritchie, 
Lulu Glaser, Maude Bliss, Christie Mac- 
Donald and Amelia Gardner. 



RIALTO RATTLES 



CLIPPER TO COST IS CENTS 

Commencing with the Sept. 24 issue of 
The Clipper, its retail price will be fif- 
teen cents per copy, a raise necessitated 
by the constantly increasing cost of pro- 
duction. 

During the war period the country's 
newspapers, almost without exception, 
were forced to raise their subscription and 
newsstand price in order to meet new 
labor and raw material conditions. 

The Clipper did not do this, but con- 
tinued to be sold at the old price of ten 
cents, believing that, with the war's end 
production costs would return to the old 
standards. This did not occur, however. 
On the contrary, they have steadily in- 
creased, and, on Oct. 1, when a new print- 
ing scale goes into effect, a still greater 
advance in production cost is to be made. 

The Clipper has been loath to make 
any increase in its sale price, but the new 
business conditions of the country, which 
have affected newspapers to a far greater 
extent than the average industry, has 
made the change in price imperative. 



ARNOLD DENIES COPYING 

Editor New York Clipper: 

Dear Sir: 

Noticed in this week's issue of the Cup- 
per that George Pelletier has filed a com- 
plaint with the N. V. A., accusing me of 
copying his character and routine, that of 
a "Colored Preacher" in character make- 
up, done by many artists too numerous to 
mention. 

Wish to vindicate myself by stating that 
I do the character of an "Old Man" minus, 
make-up, which I started doing three years 
previous to my acquaintance with Mr. Pel- 
letier. 

Furthermore, the material I am using 
does not belong 1o Mr. Pelletier. I thought 
a man of his intelligence would be more 
cautious and not make deliberate accusa- 
tions just from "hearsay." 

Jack Arnold, 
Of Jack and Eva Arnold. 

St. Joseph, Mo., Sept. 12, 1919. 



DENIES COPYING ACT 

Editor, New York Cupper: 

Dear Sir : I note in your issue of Sep- 
tember 3 that Mr. Sydney Phillips claims 
I took a portion of his act. We are both 
playing here in town, and I invite Mr. 
Phillips to come and see my act and let 
me know if I am doing anything belong- 
ing to him. I have already gone to the 
Temple Theatre, where I saw his act, and 
he does an entirely different kind of act 
than I do. 

I wish you would please deny the state- 
ment that I am doing a part of his act, for 
I do not wish my name to go down as a 
. material hound. By doing so, you will 
greatly oblige me. Sincerely, 

Er>. Phillips. 



BUT THEN, HE MAY GROW 

With all of the prices going lip, Georgia 
Price seems to be the only Price that la 
still small. 



VAUDEVILLE PROVERB 

She who does a shimmey dance 
Thrills most every audience. 

THIS ONE SHOULD DO IT 

There is an act floating around called 
Joe Broome. It ought to clean up, think 
we. 



HERE GOES 

Allen Spencer Tenney wants to know 
if a woman must take the count in order 
to become a Countess? — So do we. 



EAR-MARKS 

Judging from the remarks Arthur Lyons 
made about one of bis acts last week, be 
must be learning the scientific game of 
poker. 

"That* 8 a deuce of a good act," said be. 
"The woman member of it ia a clever joker 
and she's wild, too. Her partner is a good 
straight and, between them, they got a 
raise last week." 



THEATRICAL FAIRY TALES, NO. 7 

Once upon a time there was a press 
agent who always spoke the truth about 
the thing he was press-agenting. He ad- 
mitted that a certain show for which he 
was doing publicity work was terrible and 
stated boldly that the chorus was bad, the 
principals worse, the scenery ugly and 
everything else about the play poor. This 
agent had read about George Washington 
and his hatchet, and wanted to emulate 
the father of his country and become a 
great man. And he did become a well- 
known, if not great man. He became 
well known as an idiot and had to get 
himself another job. Whereupon, he be- 
came a policeman and was corrupted. 

COPPING THE COMMISSION 

Time — Anytime. 

Place — Office in Putnam building. 

Characters — The agents. 

Arthur Lyons — Well, morally, me and 
my brother ought to split that commission 
— we're broke and need it most. 

Sam Lyons — I'm entitled to two cents, 
anyhow. I had to write that act a letter 
before tbey coughed up. I. won't charge 
for the stationery, but the stamps cost 
money. 

Phil Bush — Whenever there's money to 
be divvied, you guys is always broke. 

Sam Bernstein — Where do youse guys 

fet that stuff? Pm a broker, too.. I'm 
roker than all of you. 
Harvey Green — Let's split it, everybody 
gets some of it. 

(Paul Allen puts a tack on Harvey's 
seat, and as he sits down he suddenly 
arises again and points a threatening 
linger at the assemblage, saying, "The 

fuy what did that doesn't get in on the 
ale." 

Paul Allen — Can't you take a joke? 

Joe Michaels — Sure! Where shall I take 
you? 

(Crowd roars its approval, and vaude- 
ville authors in the vicinity all make a 
note of the gag.) 

Harvey Green — For that, Pm inclined to 
split our partnership — 111 take the Ink 
well and penwiper and you can have the 
ledgers. 

George King — Don't fight, boys, it's all 
right. (Soothes the two.) 

Enter a reporter. 

Arthur Lyons— Hello! Say— print that 
I'm going to buy out the Keith offices and 
theatres. _ 

Chorus — So, that's the game. You don't 
need any of this commission. 

Lyons — Pm only kidding him. 

Al. Leichter grabs the commission sud- 
denly (fifty cents), and dives out of the 
room. Procession follows him through 
the hall, but Al. disappears. The crowd 
walks over to the automat and finds him 
there. He has spent the fifty cents by 
this time. (Curtain.) 



VAUDEVILLE PHILOSOPHIES 

Sharpshooting acta usually score the 
greatest number of hits. 

JOE NEED NOT WORRY 

Joe Towle is a performer who never 
need worry lest the good folk come out 

and say he has an unclean act. 



DISCOVERS A NEW ONE 

Ely Sobel, the Strand Building botani- 
cal expert, aaya that he has come across 
detailed accounts of all plants but Heart 
Beats. 



GOING UP] 

And now that the actora have won the 
strike we are waiting to see the elevator- 
men's union increased by one noted mem- 
bership. 

AGAIN AND AGAIN 

We wonder if the people who waved 
flags last week when General Pershing 
came home had Georgie Cohan's permis- 
sion to do so. 



ALLEN HAS AN EXPLANATION 

Allen Spencer Tenney, vaudeville author, 
says the reason the middle ages were 
called the dark ages was because they had 
so many knights then. 

SIGN OF THE SEASON 

Just like the coming of the swallows 
always denotes summer, so does the ar- 
rival of James Madison in our town de- 
note that autumn ia here. 



HERE'S HOWI 

The iceman on Forty-second street re- 
marked last week that business has fallen 
off noticeably since one William Page 
evacuated the Cohan and Harris Building. 



WORDS DEFINED BY NOTED MEN 
Great Man — by Arthur Lyons — Myself. 
Synagogue — by Eli Sobel — Putnam 

Building. 
Exposed Skylight— by Bob Baker— Phil 

Bush's head. 



NOTES OF THE FALL SEASON 

Al Leichter tries eating at Child's. 
Phil Bush buys a safety razor. 
Dave Green buys a razor sharpener. 
Pat Casey discovers his new belt ia too 
small. 
Bob Baker learns how to shoot craps. 



. THINGS WORTH HAVING 

Lew Bockstader's wit. 

Jimmy Hussy's Jewish accent. 

El Brendel's "collapsible" attire. 

Bob Baker's luck in the stock market. 

Ruth Budd's smile. 

Frisco's shiver. 

Henry Lewis' "song titles." 

A WHITE-LIGHT STORY 

When "John Ferguson," who had been 
in "The Lost Battalion," returned from 
war, he was "A Lonely Romeo" when ha 
first put on bis "Civilian Clothes." But, 
one evening, "At 9:45," he heard "A Vole* 
in the Dark," and when he found that 
the girl who had spoken to him waa "A 
Regular Feller," he took "The Girl in the 
Limousine," not wishing to be among 
"Those 'Who Walk in Darkness," while 
he had the price of a taxi. Later that 
night, when it began to "Thunder 9 and 
"Lightnin'," they went "Up in Mabel's 
Room." He told her he thought they both 
bad "The Right to Happiness" and that, if 
she would marry him, it would be his 
"Deliverance" and put him on the road 
"Up from Nowhere" to success. She said 
"She Would and She Did," whereupon he 
gave up his youthful "Follies," shunned 
all doings of "Scandal," and lived a life 
<ot "Happy Days" in a "Parlor, Bedroom 
and Bath." 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 




ZELLA NEVADA 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. ■ 
Style — Singing and piano. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

Zella Nevada, who made her New 

York debut at the Fifth Avenue, as- 
sisted by Gate Wellner at the piano, is 
a clever comedienne with a soprano 
voice that pleases, a strong personality 
and an act that is folly np to the 
standards of the two-a-day houses. Her 
gowns are gorgeous and her songs ex- 
cellent. Wellner, who assists at the 
piano, accompanies her in a manner that 
is fitting and proper and helps round ont 
what is in every respect an entertain- 
ing act. 

At the Thursday matinee perform- 
ance. Miss Nevada wag given a difficult 

position on the program, going on after 
several other acts that occupied a con- 
siderable length of time. In spite of 
the handicap, she was warmly applauded 
and took an encore. In an earlier spot 
she would, beyond a doubt, have scored 
even a bigger hit. 

■Miss Nevada is a singer who can 
render ballads and comedy numbers 
equally well, and she puts quite a punch 
into her work. She has a smile that 
wins favor and gives the impression that 
she really enjoys her work. She should 
be successful in the New York variety 
houses of the better class. 

The routine started with a ballad, 
after which came a darkey number. 
There was then another song that was 
liked, and a "wild man" song at the 
finish provided the big punch. She re- 
peated the chorus of the song for an 
encore. Wellner rendered a piano solo 
between the third and fourth numbers 
to enable the principal to take an encore, 
and his medley of popular tunes met with 
approval. I- S. 

HART AND LOWERY 

Theatre — Fox's Star. 
Style — Singing. 
Time— Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Harry Hart formerly appeared in a 
Morosco production, and Ed. Lowery 
recently played with Liiana Carrera. 

In number two spot, the duo took 
the biggest hand of the show, and the 
boys will eventually make a good num- 
ber two act on a big time bill. 

Both appeared dressed in gray from 
head to foot, making a very neat ap- 
pearance. They opened with a special 
number and then rendered a published , 
number. Hart followed this .with a 
ballad and sang it well. Lowery ac- 
companied him on the piano, and then 
they offered a comedy song number. 
A "Frenchie" number by Lowery and 
a jazz number by the two with a dance 
at the end, completed the offering. 

The boys have personality, and, after 
another week or so on the small time to 
smooth out the rough spots, win please 
any audience. G. J. H. 



NEW ACTS AND REAPPEARANCES 

' rConUnued (ram pagss II and 12) 



BEE PALMER 

Theatre — Mt. Vernon. 

Style — Dancing, tinging, jazz band. 

Time — Eighteen minute*. 

Setting— FuU ttage (special). 

Harry Weber is presenting the golden- 
haired, shoulder-shaking Bee Palmer, of 
the "Follies," in vaudeville. With her 
is the jazz band formerly used by Sophie 
Tucker at Beisenweber's, among its 
members being Dick Himber, the kid 
violinist, who sings a few songs with 
Miss Palmer. 

It has been said of late, and it looked 
it, that the jazz and shimmey craze is 
fast dying ont- It may be, but when 
this little exponent of the shivery dance 
hits town, the craze is due for a grand 
revival. 

The setting of the act is attractive, 
with lavender for the background. The 
band opens with jazz and Himber tells 
the boys about Bee, her shimmeying 
ability and her life. Following that, 
Miss Palmer enters with a shimmey 
and a number expressing her desire to 
go through all those motions rather than 
do any other dance. A song by Miss 
Palmer and Dick Himber is given for 
the next number. The band then "blue 
the blues," which will snrely convince 
any one that the jazz craze is booked • 
solid for a long time to come. 

Miss Palmer then renders a medley of 
"Cry" songs, accompanying herself at 
the piano, and the band plays off stage. 
Her delivery of this is excellent. 

A jazz number and dance in which all 
the six members of the band wear brown 
derbies, which we don't hold against 
them, completes the offering. 

Bee Palmer and her jazz band will 
find a big welcome in vaudeville. 

G. J. H. 



TWO YAQUIS 

Theatre— Proctor's 125« St. 

Style — Ind ian linger*. 

Time — Twelve minute*. 

Setting — In three (*peetal.) 

The two Yaquis are a man and 
woman using a set depicting the home 
of the Yaqui tribe of Indians. Accord- 
ing to history, this tribe is descended 
from the Aztecs, of Mexico, and live 
in the southern part of Arizona and 
New Mexico. 

Opening with a pose and "The End of 
A Perfect Day," the pair followed with 
a number of songs which they sang 
well, as their voices please. The rou- 
tine also includes a recitation by the 
male member of the duo, telling of the 
Indians and the white man, and greet- 
ing the latter. The act should find 
work on the small time. G. J. H. 



HUNTING AND FRANCIS 

Theatre — Mt. Vernon. 

Style — Talking and singing. 

Time — Sixteen minute*. 

Setting — In one {special). 

Hunting and Francis, back home 
after entertaining the boys overseas, are 
doing their old florist shop act again. 
The turn has played the big time, when 
the two were here a year or so ago, but 
the standard of vaudeville acts has 
changed since, and, to be frank, we 
fear that the offering will only be able 
to bold down an early position on a 
big time bill, or feature as a headliner 
on the small time. The pair are un- 
doubtedly clever and handle their ma- 
terial well, but to play the big time 
circuit in a good spot will certainly 
need newer material. 

Miss Francis is featuring a "Rose" 
ballad from "The Better 'Ole." and 
sings it - well. Hunting does a clog 
dance very nicely and could add another 
dance to the routine. At this house, 
when reviewed, they received a very 
large amount of applanse and took a 
number of bows. G. J. H. 



KARL KARNEY 

Theatre— Proctor'* 125th St. 

Style — Piano and singing. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

Karl Karney has a pleasing act, but 
will have to speed up his opening, which 
is poor. In this he renders a song 
about his act He then seats himself 
at the piano and, in song, announces 
that he will sing the old songs in synco- 
pated' manner. He started with "After 
the Ball" and then rendered an up-to- 
date version of the song that won him 
immediate favor. A song then followed 
in which he told' of the origination of 
the shimmy. A published ballad came 
next. He then played bits from 
Rachmaninoff's Symphony and rendered 
a jazz version of the song. He closed 
with a song. 

Karney is a neat-appearing young 
man. When ■ we reviewed the act, he 
was on as a tryout But, after a few 
of the rough spots are polished, he 
should find the better class houses easy 
going. G. J. H. 



THOS. L. GARRETT 

Theatre— Proctor"* 125tfc St. 

Style — Hypnotist. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting — /* tiro. 

Garrett may or may not be an ex- 
cellent hypnotist but it must be .said 
that, if the seven young men who came 
up on the stage from the audience to 
assist him are "plants," they are better 
performers than he. But. if they really 
were patrons of the theatre, then Gar- 
rett is a good hypnotist. 

After getting these seven huskies to 
assist him. he put them through the old 
routine of a burning chair, the dentist 
bit, and other bits which hypnotists 
use. The act won't do for more than 
the small time. G. J. H. 



BROOKS AND GEORGE 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th Street. 

Style — Mutical and dancing. 

Time — Fourteen minues. 

Setting — In one. 

Shelton Brooks, writer of "Darktown 
Strutters' Ball," teamed up with a new 
partner named George, is offering a two- 
act whjch should reach the two-a-day 
houses with ease. Brooks is a person- 
able fellow whose manner is one that 
wins favor, and George plays the clar- 
inet well. 

The boys know how to inject a punch 
' into their work. There are a few songs 
done by Brooks alone at the piano, and 
some dancing together. The offering in- 
cludes jazz music and a few good laughs, 
all combined so as to make a first Tate 
act. - 

They opened with a few bits of patter, 
after which Brooks, perched upon the 
piano stool, started to tickle the ivories, 
while George played the clarinet. There 
was a jazzy bit by the clarinet player 
alone, after which Brooks sang two 
songs. George reappeared after that in 
a queer costume which got him a laugh, 
and the two played a medley of songs 
which Brooks had written. A dance 
followed and elicited a hearty round of 
applause. They took an encore in the 
form of another song and dance. I. S. 



PHILIPS AND EBY 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style — Playlet. 

Time — Sixteen minute*. 

Setting— Parlor. 

This playlet, with a cast of only two, 
deals with a cute, little divorcee who 
yearns, for a return to the days of mar- 
ried life and shows the working out of 
a plan whereby she succeeds in her 
yearning and gets her. husband to return 
to her." 

The plot jumps away from the usual 
ro£' inasmuch as the audience cannot 
guess the ending until the playlet has 
almost reached its end. But the lines 
are stilted at times and are, therefore, 
hard to make real. The little girl, 
though, has a unique and fascinating 
method of delivery and charms the audi- 
ence from the very start with her infec- 
tious little laugh. Her husband, of an 
Ernest Truex type, is every bit as cap- 
able as she, and his pantomime work 
deserves more than passing commenda- 
tion. It is the personality of the pair, 
above all, that carries the playlet over. 

H. J. G. 



HAZEL HARRINGTON & CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd St. 

Style — Ooncdy Playlet. « <-• 

Time — Sixteen. Minute*. 

Setting— F«H ttage. 

"The Squab" is the title of this com- 
edy playlet, presented by a cast of three, 
two women and a man. Just why it was 
given that title is not easy to explain 
after seeing the act. It certainly does 
not suggest the story on which the of- 
fering is built. 

The poor selection of a title, however, 
is only one fault of the sketch. The 
plot is one which has been used time and 
time and again, and the manner in which 
the act has been written has not made it 
any more interesting. Any one could 
have guessed what was going to happen. 
As far as the cast is concerned, there 
is little to boast about. Not one of the 
three characters performed well. The 
element of suspense is almost entirely 
lackjng, and the turn, generally, lacks a 
punch. A stay on the small time seems 
in store for it. 

.The scene of action is laid in the home 
of an ambitions chorus girl. A member 
of the show is worried about something. 
Enter a second and more experienced 
chorus - girl. She soothes the first by 
expounding the- usual philosophy attrib- 
uted to chorus girls. She explains that 
from a member of the chorus to stardom 

■ is a big step, etc., etc. First girl then 
explains that a youthful "stage door 
John" had deserted her after marrying 
her. Experienced girl advises her to get 
as much money ont of his parents as 
possible. First girl does not want money. 
Very strange. 

Vanished stage door John .husband 
suddenly phones that his father is wait- 
ing without girl's home. Father enters, 
after first girl has left room. He meets 
second chorus girl and thinks that she 
is hia son's wife. Father recognizes her 
as a' former "friend." He attempts to 
put his manly arms around. her slender 
waist but is sharply repulsed. 

First girl then enters and refuses 
money to release his son until son him- 
self declares that he desires release. 
Father, it develops, has married a 
wealthy woman with a high social posi- 
tion, and does not want to be degraded 
by having it known that his son is the 
husband of a mere chorus girl. Exper- 
ienced girl gives him the merry laugh 
and, further, locks him in the room and 
demands a big check for love letters of 
his. He unwillingly signs check for 
$10,000. 

Young man phones that he is a mem- 
ber of the Engineers Corps of the Army. 
Second girl notifies father that son is a 
real man. Father before making exit 
is notified that letters for which he paid 
$10,000 have been burned. He is indig- 
nant but leaves. All is well. I. S. 



BROWN-GARDNER-BARNETT 

Theatre— Victoria. 
Style — Song and Dance. 
Time — Ttoentv-five minute*. 
Setting — Full-tpecial. 

This act is composed of a dancing 
team and a pianist. 

The act opened with an introductory 
song by the male member of the team, 
followed by a semi-oriental dance in 
which he also participates. The accom- 
panist then sang a comedy number in 
which he showed how his preference for 
hard boiled eggs had got him into 
trouble. This was followed by another 
terpsichorean exhibition which is not 
only a standard dance, but has also been 
performed a good deal better. 

A burlesque by the pianist on an ora- 
torio followed, after which they did an 
Apache number which they have invested 
with several new steps. They dance 
well and -their numbers are well ar- 
ranged. The pianist is a fairly clever 
comedian. S. K. 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




TRY TO SETTLE 

CLUB TROUBLES 

TUESDAY 

GENERAL MEETING CALLED 



The internal political strife that has been 
raging in the burlesque club since and be- 
fore the recent wholesale resignation of its 
officers, is due for a thorough airing next 
Tuesday when a special meeting will be 
held to elect new officers. 

This meeting would have been held 
sooner were it not that, under the club's 
present constitution and by-laws, at least 
fourteen days' notice must be given to all 
members that a special meeting will be 
held. 

Not only will there be an election of 
new officers at. this meeting, but the mat- 
ter of amending the club's by-laws will be 
voted upon also. For it was because of 
the ambiguity of some of these by-laws, ac- 
cording to several members, that the club's 
internal affaire reached a state several 
weeks ago which boded ill for the 
organization and resulted in the request 
for resignations from secretary Al Singer 
and treasurer Dan Dody, both of whom 
complied with the request. 

Henry Jacobs, however, retained his of- 
fice of president, and James E. "Blutch" 
Cooper, who was home seriously ill while 
the "rumpus" was going on- within the 
club still remains vice-president.. The fol- 
lowing nominees, it is said, will probably 
rule over the club's destinies, as officers, 
. following the election next Tuesday : 
William Roehm, James E. "Blutch" 
Cooper, Lou Sidman and Dr. Louis M. 
Suss. 

The burlesque club has a membership 
totaling 300 and it is said that there was 
almost $2,000 in the treasury following the 
annual outing last July. 

Henry C. Jacobs, president, stated last 
week that arrangements have been made to 
give up the lease on the building and store 
the club's furnishings until its affairs are 
straightened. out, after which new quarters 
will be acquired. 



NATIONAL LOSES HOUSE 

MontbeaJL, Que., Sept. 13. — Marcus 
Loew has' purchased the Theatre Francais 
and will remodel it for vaudeville, booked 
through his New fork office. It will have 
a seating capacity of over 3,000. The Na- 
tional Burlesque Circuit was to have bad 
this house for their shows. It is now ru- 
mored that the third circuit is after the 
Royal or the Rialto, on St. Catherine 
street. 

The Rialto formerly played "tabs" and 
vaudeville and has a seating capacity of 
about 1,400.' The house will have to be 
entirely renovated if the new circuit takes 
it over to get it into proper condition. 
Considerable money will have to be spent 
on it also. 



HUGHIE SHUBERT IS BACK 
Hugh Shubert has returned to New 
York and taken over the leadership of 
tiie orchestra at Hurtig and Seamon's, 
where he will remain until the Torkville 
opens, October 21. He will. then handle 
the orchestra at that house. 



FRANK MACKEY HURTS SHOULDER 

Frank Mackey was compelled to lay 
off most of last week from the cast of the 
Union Square on account of a dislocated 
shoulder he received in a fall the previous 
Sunday. Leo Stevens played his part. 



OLYMPIC RAISES PRICES 

The Olympic has increased its prices at 
both the night shows and matinees, get- 
ting a dollar top in the orchestra at night 
down front row. The same seats sell for 
seventy-five cents at the matinee. 



DUFFY JOINS MARION SHOW 

Watebbust, Conn., Sept. IS. — Tom 
Duffy joined -the Dave Marion Show here 
to-day. He has been- doing a vaudeville 
act with Leo Hoyt 



STAR CONCERTS OPEN SUNDAY 

Manager Mike Joyce, of the Star, 
Brooklyn, will start his Sunday concerts 
next Sunday. Jos. Sbea will book the 
house. 



WANT SUMMER 
RUNS IN OTHER 

CITIES 

CHICAGO, BOSTON, PHILA., NAMED 



IN A HAYWARD RETURNING 

Ina Hay ward will return to burlesque 
as prima donna of the "Social Maids." 
She will open at tile Olympic, Cincinnati, 
Sunday, September 21. Maud Hayward 
will be the musical director of the show. 
Miss Hayward had been booked with a 
big musical production. ■ Paul Cunning- 
ham and Florence Bennett close with the 
- show in Dayton. 



MARTHA RUSSELL MARRIES 

Austin, Texas, Sept 14. — Martha Bus- 
sell, appearing here in "Rocking The 
Boat" was married last week to Walter 
Le Roy, her leading man. Catherine Cam- 
eron and Albert G. Bruce, two other mem- 
bers of the act, were present at the cere- 
mony and at a wedding supper at the 
Driscoll Hotel. 



GET COIN IN PATERSON 

Patersor, N. J., Sept. 15. — Billy Wat- 
son's- Lyceum Theatre played to over 
$1,000, with Gas Hill's Minstrels for one 
night lsst week. "Bringing Up Father" 
did over $3,000 in three days. "Parlor, 
Bedroom and Bath" played to capacity for 
two nights. 



V1DA SOPOTA BOOKED 
Vida Sopota has been booked by Ike 
Weber as prima donna of "The Round the 
Town" company. She will open at the 
Empire, Cleveland. He also booked Don 
Trent with the Bostonians. He opened 
last Saturday in Albany. 



JOINS "WONDER SHOW" 

Lloyd Peddrick left New York for Pitta- 
burgh last Wednesday to join the Bur- 
lesque Wonder Show. He took the place 
left vacant through the death of Charles 
Fige on Monday. He was booked by 
Roehm and Richards. 



CLOSING OUT KAHN'S 

Bert Bernard, who is doing a Dutch 
comedy at Kahn's Union Square, and 
Stella Rose, a soubtette, will close there 
Saturday 6f next week. Harry Kohler 
and Sue Milford will replace them. 



WELLS LOOKING OVER SHOWS 

Billy Wells left New York last Wednes- 
day lor Chicago to look over the "Vic- 
tory Belles" and the "Blue Birds." They 
are both Cooper shows and were in Chi- 
cago at the same time. 

BILLY RANDOLPH CLOSING 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 13. — Billy 
Randolph will close with the Aviator Girls 
at the Empire, Hoboken, next week. 



Agitation to have burlesque shows play 
a Summer season in a number of cities 
besides New York is being fostered by 
several show managers. Heretofore, only 
New York and one show has enjoyed this 
privilege. 

The plan is, it was learned last week, 
to have the shows play fifty weeks, con- 
secutively, and how this is to be accom- 
plished was outlined as follows: The busi- 
ness done by all of the shows playing over 
the two foremost wheels will be tabulated 
and scored during the next ten weeks- 
After that, each show will be given a cer- 
tain rating, the show's money-getting abil- 
ity, being the principal determining factor 
in the high or low rating it receives. 

By next April, those shows receiving a 
certain rating, will be assigned to play 
return engagements in the following cities 
outside New York: Philadelphia, Boston, 
Chicago, Pittsburgh, Washington, and 
maybe several other cities not yet decided 
upon. 

This plan will probably be submitted to 
the burlesque wheel heads, and, should it 
fail to meet with their approval, an alter- 
nate plan baa been devised which is de- 
signed to keep at least certain of the 
more popular shows working longer than 
the usual thirty-five or forty weeks 
ordinarily allotted them during past sea- 
sons. 

Under the alternate plan, the shows with 
the highest rating mark w ill be booked for 
engagements extending longer than the cus- 
tomary one week period in, the larger 
cities. 



OPENS AT MTNSKY'S 

Ruth Rolling will open at Minsky 
Brothers' National Winter Garden next 
week. 



BARTON LOOKING OVER WHEEL 

Charles Barton, president of the new 
National burlesque wheel, is touring the 
circuit looking over the shows. 

HOWE SHOW DOES $4500 
Pateeson, N. J., Sept. 12. — Sam 
Howe's Show played to over $4,500 at 
Watson's Orpheum here last week. 



BUFFALO MANAGER DIES 

Buffalo, N. Y., Sept 12.— Richard E. 
Patton, manager of the Gayety Theatre, 
died at his home in this city this week 
from heart failure. He had been suffering 
with an ulcerated tooth, and was sitting 
in the dining room talking to Mrs. Patton 
when he suddenly passed away. He was 
forty-six years of age at the time of bis 
death. Interment is at Forest Lawn 

Cemetary, this city. 

The managers of the theatres of this 
city were the pall bearers. Floral pieces 
were sent from the Columbia Amusement 
Company, Gayety Theatre Employees, 
Shea's Amusement Company, Fred Irwin, 
The Garden Theatre Employees, Managers' 
Association, The Twentieth Century 
Maids, -playing the Gayety this week and 
the show Patton managed for years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Barney Gerard, John M. Ward, 
manager of the Gayety, Detroit Phil 
Isaacs and A. G. Wells, manager and 
treasurer of the Academy, Bill Posters 
Local 24, Gayety Inn and others. 

Dick Patton has been manager of the 
Gayety Theatre for the last two seasons 
and had been manager of a number of 
burlesque shows for years previous to 
that He started bis career as most of 
the successful burlesque managers and 
owners nave, with a circus. He was one 
of the best liked and known burlesque 
managers in the country. He is survived 
by his wife, Hope. Sawyer Patton. 



"GIRLS FROM GAITTES" OPENS 

Rochester, N. Y., Sept 13.— The "Girls 
From the Gaieties" opened here to-day at 
the Columbia (the old Corinthian). In 
the cast are Jack Hunt Max Cohen, Al 
Marks, Vic Barrett Easter Higbee, Bease 
Rosa and Adelaide Nye. 



(Bartesqoo Now* continued on page* 29 



32) 



BAKER SHOULD GET 
THE MONEY WITH HIS 
"SWEET SWEETIE GIRLS" 

Charlie Baker baa been telling us for 
a long while about the wonderful show he 
was going to have the following season, bot 
when the show came along there was noth- 
ing about It to make It stand out from 
other good showa This season he had 
little to say about his "Sweet, fcMeetie 
Girls." so we did not look forward to see- 
ing very much. 

It came to the Star, Brooklyn, though, 
last week, and we want to say tbat It's tbe 
best show Baker bas ever had, and one of 
tbe best we have seen on the American 
Burlesque Circuit. So, it Baker carries out 
the same policy wltb his "Tempters," we 
surely have another surprise coming to us 
when tbat show hits town. 

Tbe "Sweet, Sweetie Girls" Is a great 
entertainment from a comedy, muslcaj, 
scenic and wardrobe standpoint. It Is one 
ot tbe best costumed shows we have seen 
on either circuit so far this season, and 
that applies to chorus as well as principals. 
Max Field and Frank Anderson are tak- 
ing care of the comedy, and they sre both 
showing us a great deal more now than 
last season. Field, a natural Hebrew 
comedian. Is working faster than we have 
ever seen bun before, and bis material goes 
over better, also. He Is out-doing tbe pace 
he set last season in tbe changing ol ward- 
robe. Opening wltb a tuxedo suit, be makes 
a change nearly every time he goes on. If 
our memory serves us right, be wore eight 
different suits during the performance, al- 
"i". ». 
Anderson, doing Irish, bandied' bis comedy 
part very well. He is a hard worker and 
never falls to get a point over when It Is 
possible. He, too, makes a number of 
changes of wardrobe, always putting up a 
good appearance. 

Forest Wyer is the "straight" man and 
is responsible tor the book, so tbe pro- 
gramme atates. This young man has given 
Baker something worth while here. Be is 
a good "straight," "feeds" the comedians . 
wltb plenty of laughs, and keeps them on 
their toes all the time. He Is a classy 
dresser' and has an extensive wardrobe. 

As tbe Juvenile in the first part, Charlie 
Levlne does very nicely. He Is a clean-cut 
young fellow wbo dresses well. He does 
a Jap in the second part, carrying out the 
character most satisfactorily. 

Stella Morrlsey Is tbe clssslest prima 
donna we have seen so far this season at 
tbls house. She Is a most attractive yonag 
lady with a personality tbat radiates far 
out over the footlights. She rendered her 
number* caK-tally and cleverly. Khe works 
easily ami has a great stage presence. One 
fine thing about her too Is that she does not 
take herself too seriously,- Just working al 
thongb sbe enjoyed sll she bad to do. Miss 
Morrlsey * la the most handsomely gowned 
prima dojna we have seen. She makes 
seven changes of wardrobe, each gown of 
a different design and prettier tban tbe 
other, and all blending well with her hair 
and complexion. Tbe gown she wears In the 
last scene of tbe last act. Is one of the 
most gorgeous ever seen In burlesque, and 
her headpiece to match the gown Is dasallog 
In rlchnesu and beauty. Miss Morrlsey 
should be the talk of the circuit tbls season. 
Florence De Vere, a pretty dancing 
sonbrette, full of life and ginger, was a 
decided bit with her numbers, putting them 
over wltb the necessary "punch." Bbe 
made a good impression with the audience. 
She has a pleasing personality; a graceful 
way of working and offers pretty dresses. 

Shapely Anna Fink, with her familiar 
smile, that soon won the audience, was 
seen in severs! scenes and took care ot them 
to tbe pleasure of all. Bbe bandied her 
numbers nicely and with lots of speed. She 
ll most attractive In tights, bat looks very 
well In ankle-length dresses. Her ward- 
robe has been selected with care, and la 
very pretty. 

Field and Wyer do a comedy talking Spec- 
ialty in one. down near the flnlsb ot the 
show, tbat was a near riot last Thursday 
night. It' simply had the audience rolling 
In their seats from laughter. 
- "Sweet Sweetie Girls" U a fast ahow, 
never lagging a . second from tbe time the 
curtain went up to the finale. It baa clever 
principals, and the show Is all class. As 
a scenic production, there Is nothing that 
we have, seen on either circuit that can 
pass it. Baker should get ths money with 
this show, which has been well put on, and 
of the type which will please all. Sn>. 



16 



NEW 1 YORK^ CLIPPER 



■l -September 17, 1919 



•"•-y 



SUCCESS 
POPULARITY 



WATTS UPON THE ARTIST WHO 
LOOKS FOR THIS EMBLEM 
WHEN SEEKING A SONG HIT. 

REWARDS THE ORCHESTRA 
THAT MAKES SELECTIONS 
WHERE THIS EMBLEM IS SEEN. 



THE 
BIGGEST 



THE 
BEST 



ALL 
AGREE 



■ 

■ 







THIS 
EMBLEM 



STANDS 
FOR 



REAL 




-" ■ 

:■.;.-■. . .;. .'■.' 



Come where the real hits are made — and get yours. Not merely Ja 
handful of "Professional Copies" — But an intelligent and courteous 
attention to your individual needs. It's the service that counts! Try 
it. Call, 'phone, or write any or all of us. 



Irring Berlin 

Broadway Music 
Corporation 



Company 
CC Church 

Meyw Cohan 
Music Company 



Daniel* Jfc Wilson 

Leo Feist 

C Arthur Fifer 
Mntir Company 

Sam Fox Publishing 
Company 

Gilbert * Friedland 
Chas. K. Harris 



Kendis-Brockman 
Music Company 

McCarthy A Fisher 



MJCI-Oey M 

Company 



Joe Morris Music 

Company 
Pace and Handy 



Al Piantadon 

Jerome H. Remick 

Maurice Richmond 
M u sic Company 

Shapiro, . Bernstein 
and Company 

Sherman, Clay 
and Company 



A. J. Stasny 
and Company 

• *oa, Yf • Stern 
and Company 

Harry Von Tilier 

W.lerson, Berlin & Snyde 

M. Witmark A Sons 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



h£EI*ODY LJQME 



MANY MUSIC HOUSES 
LOSE TRADE LISTING 



Retail Syndicate Sla.hc* Trade Circular 

and Many Publishers Lose Place 

on Valuable Document. 

The "list," that mysterious but im- 
portant trade bulletin Bent out by one of 
the big retail syndicates to its various 
stores, and which contains the names of 
the song publications which the syndicate, 
buyer believes to be the most salable and 
from, which the various store' managers 
are to make up their, orders, got a slash 
recently which will long be remembered. 

A number of music publishers variously 
reported as being all the way from fifteen 
to twenty-five fell into the discard when 
the music man had finished with his prun- 
ing knife. 

This list, which has been sent out for 
years to the stores, "is a large and impor- 
tant document, and a publisher so fortu- 
nate as to have six or eight of his pub- 
lications mentioned was assured of a good 
business from that alone. The hundreds 
of retail stores owned by the syndicate 
made up their orders almost exclusively 
from the songs mentioned on the list, and 
with no numbers listed the publisher suf- 
fered a corresponding lack of trade from 
the section in which the stores were lo- 
cated. 

The big music publishers; that is, those 
who have largo catalogues and vigorously 
exploited their compositions in the the- 
atres, naturally had their numbers listed, 
but there were also a considerable number 
of the smaller houses, those who main- 
tained a small or practically no profes- 
sional department that also either through 
personality or some other reason got a 
few numbers listed. These houses did a 
considerable amount of business from the 
listing alone, and the fact that their num- 
bers did appear on the circular was a 
decided asset to the firm. 

These are the ones that have suffered 
the cut, and much speculation as to the 
cause has arisen. One of the reasons ad- 
vanced for their elimination is said to be 
that many of the big publishers have ad- 
vanced an argument against the smaller 
houses being listed, claiming that the lit- 
tle publisher having no big professional 
expense necessary in popularizing a song 
success, could sell at a much cheaper rate 
and Btill make more money, than the big 
houses. They chum that the' six and a 
half cent rate which generally prevails for 
the big publishers' pruts does not show a 
profit, and c that is one of the reasons 
which has forced them into the sixty-cent 
publication business. . They claim that 
this will increase until either the syndi- 
cates pay a higher price for the popular 
prints or greatly increase their orders. It 
is churned by a number who claim to be 
in the know that the syndicate has de- 
cided in future to put its big efforts be- 
hind the publications of the larger houses 
and in order to increase business with 
them has decided to eliminate the cata- 
logues of a number of the small bouses 
from the list. 



JONES MUSIC CO. OPENS 

The Jones Music Co. has opened offices 
in the Gaiety Theatre Building. A. G. 
Jones is president of the company and 
Anita Owens, the composer, is connected 
with the company in the capacity of pro- 
fessional coach. 



JOE SANTLEY WITH PAT ROONEY 

Joe Santley, the songwriter and former 
vaudeville performer, is now in vaudeville 
with Pat Booney. They are appearing at 
the Riverside Theatre this week. 



FRED BELCHER IS DEAD ' 

Frederick E. Belcher, secretary of the 
music publishing company of Jerome H. 
Remick & Co., died on Thursday night at 
Dr. Stern's sanatorium following an opera- 
tion for .appendicitis. Mr. Belcher had 
been ill for several days prior to the 
operation with a severe cold which he 
contracted as a result of being caught in 
a rainstorm while motoring from Boston. 

The cold did not respond to treatment, 
and developed into influenza, and while 
being treated for that malady symptoms 
of appendicitis appeared. Last Tuesday 
night he was operated on by Dr. Philip 
Grausman, who discovered that the ap- 
pendix had burst. Following the opera- 
tion his condition was very low, but dur- 
ing Wednesday he improved so perceptibly 
that hopes for bis recovery were held. 
On Thursday, bowever, be suffered a re- 
lapse, fell into unconsciousness late in 
the afternoon and passed away at mid- 
night. 

(He was fifty-two years old and been 
connected with the Remick bouse for 
many years, commencing his work shortly 
after the Remick publishing business was 
started in Detroit. Over fifteen years ago 
he came to. New. York to take charge of 
the local branch of the house, and has 
made this city bis home ever since. Mod- 
est and assuming of manner yet possessing 
exceptional business ability be attracted 
innumerable friends in those early days, 
scores' of whom have been close to him 
throughout all these years. He was uni- 
versally liked throughout the theatrical 
and musical world, and numbered bis 
friends along Broadway by the hundreds. 

The funeral was held at Campbell's 
Sixty-sixth street establishment, and was, 
attended by many people prominent in 
theatricals and the music publishing' busi- 
ness. The chapel was crowded to the 
doors, and one end of the room was com- 
pletely filled with floral pieces.- The 
Episcopal burial service was read, a quar- 
tet sang and Eddie Miller, with much 
vocal pathos rendered "Till We Meet 
Again," Mr.. Belcher's favorite song. 

Mr. Belcher was married a few weeks 
ago to Miss Flo Hart,' an actress, ;' who 
survives him. While he for years had been 
in the best of health . he may . have had 
some premonition of the end, for bnt two 
weeks ago he took out a life insurance 
policy for $28,000. 

KERRY MILLS HAS A NEW ONE 

"Floating Down the Old Monongahela" 
is the title of a recent release by Kerry 
Mills, who has in the new number a song 
which, although just off the press, is at- 
tracting much attention. 

It is issued both as an instrumental and 
vocal number, and the orchestras that have 
been playing it nave already got the tune 
well established in the minds of those who 
are on the outlook for new and con- 
tagious melodies. 

The song is particularly attractive, and 
is being featured by many singers. 

MANY CASTLE SONGS OUT , 

If there was any doubt as to the neces- 
sity of a registry bureau for the preven- 
tion of song; title duplication, the flood of 
"Castle" songs recently released would 
have definitely decided the question. No 
less than a naif a dozen are announced 
ready for release by the big publishing 
houses, and there is no telling how many 
are ready to be sent out by the smaller 
publishers in other towns and cities. 

GILBERT RELEASES SONG 

Gilbert and Friedl&nd 'have released to 
vaudeville singers the comedy rag song, 
"Gimme This, Gimme This, Gimmie That?' 
which was successfully sung by Lew 
Cooper in, "Oh, What a Girl?' 



PRINTERS' STRIKE MAY 
HOLD UP MUSIC PLANS 



Demand for Bis; Wage lucres so Ex* 

peeled to Clo.c All Printing 
Plants in New York. 

The plans and expectations of all the. 
music publishers for - a record breaking 
business this fall are liable to receive a 
severe setback by the probable strike of 
all the music printing plants on October 1, 
The unions have made a demand for a 
big wage increase, so large that few print- 
ers feel that it can be met, and the talk 
of a strike is heard in all quarters. In 
any event a big boost in the price of music 
printing is coming, and this is bound to 
seriously affect the retail price of the 
popular prints. 

. Publishers have for months freely stated 
that the' present wholesale price of the 
songs which retail for ten cents is so low 
that the margin of profit to be made upon 
them has almost reached the vanishing 
point. 

Publishers are seriously discussing some 
way in which the proposed increase can 
be bandied, bnt up to date no way can be 
suggested. One that is receiving serious 
consideration is the raising of prices all 
along the line, but this method naturally 
will be met by strong opposition on the 
part of the big five and ten cent stores. 

Printers have during the past week sent 
out notifications to publishers that on and 
after October 1 a decided increase in "print- 
ing prices. can be expected. 

HERBERT SONG STARTS A SUIT 

In the. Victor Herbert show, "Angel 
Face," which made all Chicago sit up dur- 
ing its run in that city, is a song called 
"I Might Be Your Once In a While/' which 
is' not only the big bit of the piece, but 
bids fair to rank in popularity with any 
of the previous Herbert successes. 

So much does George W. Lederer, the 
producer of the piece, think of, the song 
that as soon as he learned of a proposed 
production of a play entitled "My Once In 
a While," by the Scibillia, Inc., concern, 
he hurried to his attorneys with instruc- 
tions to immediately commence an action 
to restrain its presentation, alleging that 
it is' an infringement on his title. 

PRINCE KNOWS JOHNNY'S IN TOWN 

The young Prince of Wales, now on a 
visit to Canada, knows the popular songs, 
and at a reception given him at the 
Country Club in Ottawa requested the or- 
chestra leader to play a number of bits 
for dancing. The first question asked the 
orchestra leader was what dance music be 
knew. The leader suggested several of 
the higher class compositions, but the 
Prince was unfamiliar with them. ""Do 
you know 'Johnny's In Town'?" inquired 
the director. "I surely do," replied -the 
young heir to the English throne, and as 
the band struck up the tune the Prince, 
with Lady Dorothy Cavendish as partner, 
swung out on the floor and proved himself 
some dancer. 



JEROMEf H. REMICK IN N. Y. 

Jerome H. Remick, head of the music 
publishing house of that name, is in New 
York for an indefinite stay, due to the 
sudden death of Fred Belcher. Mr. Rem- 
ick has many business interests outside of 
music publishing which for the past few 
years has kept him almost continually in 
Detroit, his visits to the New York office 
having been infrequent during the past 
year. 

WENRICH HAS (SHOW READY 

Percy Wenrieh has a new musical show 
all ready for production, and the piece, 
as yet unnamed, will probably be seen 
within the next few weeks. Wenrieh, in 
addition to writing the music of the show, 
found the financial backing necessary for 
the production, so all that now remains 
to launch the piece is the engaging of the 
cast and the completion of rehearsals. 

HIGH CLASS SONG RELEASED 

Leo Feist has released a new high-class 
number entitled "Poppy Blossoms," by 
Jack Yellen and Abe Olman. Although 
less than a week old the number is being 
played by scores of the orchestras In the 
big Broadway restaurants and other 
amusement resorts. 



ENGLISH MUSIC MAN IN N. Y. 

Dan Lassett, of the English music 
house of Francis, Day & Hunter, is in 
New York attending to some business in 

connection with his house. 



Q. R. S. BUYS N. Y. PROPERTY 
The Q. R. 8. Music Roll Co. has pur- 
chased an entire city block. of New York 
property located at 134th street and Lo- 
cust avenue, and will erect a big factory 
for the manufacture of music rolls. 

Lee Roberts, the composer, is vice-presi- 
dent of the company, and be recently pur- 
chased a home in this city and expects to 
locate here shortly. The purchase of the 
New York property, together with Rob- 
erts' intention to make his home in this 
city, indicates that the entire Q. R. S. 
business formerly located in Chicago is to 
be moved to New York. 



MURRAY BLOOM IN DETROIT 

Murray Bloom, 1b professional manager 
of the Harry Von Tilzer music house in 
Detroit, where be is meeting with remark, 
able success placing the new songs from 
his bouse. While in Detroit he is making 
his headquarters at the Statler Hotel. 

GOODWIN IN WEST 46th ST. 

Harry Goodwin, advertising manager of 
the Jos. W. Stern St, Co. music publishing 
company, has moved bis office from the 
Stern Building on West Thirty-eighth 
street to the new professional quarters in 
West Forty-sixth street. 

HARRIS WRITES TWO BALLADS 

Ohas. K. Harris has recently completed 
two ballads which are being sung by a 
number of well-known artists. They are 
"Smiling Lips" and 'When the Lotus 
Flowers Bloom in China Land." 



SPECIAL SONG BRINGS MONEY 

Johnny Cantwell purchased the sing 
rights of a new comedy number ca. 
"Water Is Dangerous" last week from its 
writer, Jack Mahoney. Cantwell paid $250 
for the exclusive rights to the song. 

KRONBERG SAILED YESTERDAY 

C. J. Kronberg, of the Plaza Music Co., 
sailed for Europe yesterday (Tuesdsj). 
He will be absent for about ten weeks and 
will visit England, France and Switzer- 
land. 



M1TTENTHAL BACK FROM WEST 

Joe Mittenthal, manager of the Mc- 
Carthy & Fisher Co., returned this week 
from a successful business trip to Chicago 
and other Middle West cities. 



HARRIS SCENARIO FOR FIELDS 

Chas. K. Harris and Adeline Lertxbach 
have completed a new motion picture scen- 
ario for Lew Fields, entitled "What Chil- 
dren Will Do." 



CHARLES REED WITH STERN 

Charles Reed, who has been in vaude- 
ville with the Ms dam Cronin act has Joined 
the professional department of Jos. W. 
Stern & Co. 



STERN RELEASES TWO SONGS 

Jos. W. Stern & Co. have released two 
new vocal numbers by S. S. Henry, D. 
Onivas and Frank H. Warren. They are 
"Now I Know" and "Good Night, Dearie." 



HERMAN SCHENCK HAS THE FLU 

Herman Scbenck, assistant professional 
manager of the Harry Von Tilzer Co., is 
ill at home with an attack of the influenza. 



BERLIN TO TRY VAUDEVILLE 

Irving Berlin is panning a try at vaude- 
ville, and will open on Oct. 6 at the River- 
side. Theatre. 



FRED BECK WITH FISHER CO. 

Fred Beck has joined the McCarthy & 
Fisher staff and will be assistant to Joe 
Mittenthal, the firm's general manager. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 




Lets of I 



Mis sbi 



EVERY TEAR 
IS A SMILE IN 
AN IRISHMAN'S 



i 




\ 



This! is WA 
It's going to z i\ 

Lyric by W' 

-■iV". ! ' ' M 



VAN &. SCHENCF 



OPEN UP THE GOLDEI 



Lyric by 



Going Bigger Than Ever- 



CANSTlME ! WILD , WllSiN? SWSl^U?'? T'^ER MUSIC PUB, 

■ _ ■■•■■, _ ; BtlNBORIMSitlN; Genera ;Manaqer 

Greatest Comedy Song 1 ; ^ ,WA. 



Greatest Comedy Song 
on the Market 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19* 



: 



thicom'^ ^ following SURE FIRE HITS 



>». 



WE 



•Doubles for Two Men or two <*W* 

horuses .'_, 



Waltz 



r Number 
3the Country 

HIRSCH ; i 1 

y 

MIDT 



IIG DIXIE SONG HIT 



Music by 
HARRY VON TILZER 



Tfie Best Blues 
Song on the Mdirljet; 

I AIN'T >iN 

'EN NO TIME 

T& HAVE THt 



A Great Harmony Song and 
a Groat Patter Chorus 



'■ 



Wi 



TES TO DIXIELAND 



YELLEN 



>22 West 46th Street, New York City 



iTON— 22Q TREMONT 



MURRAY 1 BLOOM. Professional Manager 

„ tJ , , '<! n t !■■ PHI A -K E IT H :TH E A3>R E B I. O.G 'U ■ .. .. 



PHILADELPHIA 



Our Big Ballad Hit! 

SOMEBODY'S WAITING 
FOR SOMEONE 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 




■5 a c c e 

• ~ o S • 

x o *- 5 u = 



September 17, 1919 



SB 



THE NEW YORKCLIPFER 



21 



LONDON 



FQMF1€N NEWS 



CROOKS ARE EXPLOITING 

SOLDIERS FOR PETTY GRAFT 

Many Cases of Fraud and Petty Larceny in Which Theatres, 

Demobilized Officers and Disabled Soldiers are the Victims 

.Have Been Reported to the Police 



London, England, Sept 14. — The re- 
turn from France to England of prac- 
tically all the wounded and disabled sol- 
diers, and their being placed in various 
hospitals throughout the country has 
given rise to a particularly mean form of 
thievery, of which the theatres have •been 
the especial victims. The soldiers and 
their wounds are being used as a cloak 
by unscrupulous parties and petty larcen- 
ers, who would no more face a real fight 
than do an honest job. These crooks do 
not hesitate at using any means whatso- 
ever, as long as their object is gained. 

Among the forms of thieving which have 
become annoying beyond endurance is one 
of procuring money and theatre tickets by 
means of misrepresentation. A recent 
case was that of a man who claimed to be 
Doctor Sinclair, attached to the Hemp- 
stead Military Hospital, and who said he 
had been sent to book 100 stalls for 
wounded soldiers. He was given a note by 
the secretary of the theatre on the box 
office of the Palladium. On the way, he 
evidently forged the note to read differ- 



ently. The note had requested, originally, 
that the bearer be given the 100 tickets. 
When presented it read that he waa to be 
given $125. As the box office attendant 
was very busy, the authenticity of the note 
was not questioned and the money was 
paid. Later the fraud was discovered and 
the case reported to the police. 

Another form of thievery is the procur- 
ing of funds by promises of employment 
as concert managers. In connection with 
this, the case of Basil Reginald Jarvis, an 
entertainer, who, it is said, had been get- 
ting money from demobilized offiders in 
this way, and who, it was discovered had 
nothing to do with the concerts, is typi- 
cal. On the complaint of one of bis vic- 
tims, who produced written testimony to 
prove his case, Jarvis was arrested and is 
now being tried for fraud. The soldiers 
themselves are, in many cases, the vic- 
tims of petty thieves and no respect is 
being shown for wounded or permanently 
disabled, as long as they can be used to 
further the personal ends of the unscru- 
pulous. 



HARRY CLARK DOING WELL 

Caracas, Venezuela, Sept. 1. — Harry 
Clark, traveling through South America 
with American vaudeville shows, left J- 
Pablo and Olivia Zanor, who did an act 
known as Li Ho Chang and Company, due 
to a disagreement. He has now taken 
over the management of the Tatali Vaude- 
ville Company, owned by Mr. and Mrs. 
Tatali and traveling through Brazil at 
present. In the company are La Belle 
Eva, Miss Rita, Miss Adela, Miss Bosetta, 
Humbert Tatali, George Mayer, Charles 
LaMas, Trio Luciana and Sr. Cantalicio. 
The company just finished a six months' 
tour of Venezuela to good business. 



"CHEATING CHEATERS" OPENS 

Paris, France, Sept. 14. — "A Bon 
Chat," an adaption of Max Martin's 
"Cheating Cheaters," has succeeded in 
creating a favorable impression, which 
many American plays have failed to . do. 
The mystery of the play has had Paris 
audiences guessing for quite a while and 
they seem unable to classify it, for the 
construction of it is peculiarly American, 
and the French have not yet learnt the 
simplicity of American plays and acting. 
The principal parts in the play are enacted 
by Messieurs. Rouyer and Loverne, and 
Mesdames Cherrel and Rafele. The piece 
was adapted by Pierre Veber. 



LONDON LIKES "DADDIES" 

London, Eng., Sept 14. — "Daddies," 
Belasco's American play, has opened at 
the Haymarket, and the audience was ap- 
preciative of every point, and the comedy 
proved to be a great success. 

In the cast are A. E. Matthews, George 
Tolly, Sam Ldvesay, G. H. Mnlcaster, 
Thomas Wegnelin, Emily Brooke, Mary 
Jerrold, Stella Jesse, Peppettia Bobadilla, 
Madeline Robinson, Ivy Pike, Albert Cor- 
ronal, Marie Corronal, Betty Hearn, Eric 
Lewis, Ethel Callahan and Nora Robin- 
son. 



HIPPODROME CAST CHANGES 

London, Eng., Sept 15. — The cast of 
"Joybells," the Hippodrome Revue, of 
which Leon Errol is the chief comedian, 
has undergone a change. Shirley Kellog 
no longer sings her songs, having been re- 
placed by Wanda Lyon. Ettorina Mazzuc- 
chelli has been added to the cast aa prin- 
cipal dancer. The revue has passed the 
250th performance. 



GETS "EAST IS WEST" RIGHTS 

London, Eng., Sept 14. — Holies and 
Zeitlin have acquired the English produc- 
tion rights to "East Is West," the play by 
John B. Hymer and Samuel Shipman, 
which William Harris is presenting with 
such notable success on Broadway, New 
York, and will produce the piece in con- 
junction with Norman J. Norman. 



MAUDE'S NEW PLAY READY 

Liverpool, Eng., Sept 15. — Cyril Maude 
opens tonight at the Shakespeare Theatre 
in his new English play, by Sydney Blow 
and Douglas Hoare, entitled "Lord Richard 
in the Pantry." The play is to be pro- 
duced under the management of Thos. C. 
Dagnall. Prominent in the company will 
be LydiaBilbrooke, Connie Eddiss, George 
Shelton, G. W. Anson and Nellie Bowman. 



BARRIE AND PINERO COMING 

LONDON, Eng., Sept 15.— Sir Arthur 
Wing Pinero will visit New York to see 
the premiere of his new comedy "Quick 
Work," which the Charles Frohman com- 
pany is producing. James M. Barrie will 
also come to America soon. 



GRACE WYNDHAM GETS PLAY 

London, Eng., Sept 14.— Grace Wynd- 
ham, the American actress, has secured 
the sole rights to "Bachelor Brown," a 
farce comedy by Dentor Spencer, which 
she will produce with a cast of West End 
artists. The play contains four char- 
acters. 



SAILING FOR NEW YORK 

London, Eng., Sept 15 (Special). — 
Percy Hutchinson and his company sail 
today for New York, where they open 
October 6 at the Manhattan Opera House 
in "The Luck of the Navy." 



EDYTHE GO OD ALL TO PRODUCE 

London, Eng., Sept 14. — Edyth Goodall, 
the actress, is to try a season of manage- 
ment in London. She has already a play 
by John Drink-water called "Mary, Queen 
of Scotts," and another, as yet unnamed, 
by Arnold Bennett 



PARIS HAS BIG HIT 

Paris, France, Sept 5. — There waa 
produced here last week, among a series 
Of one-act plays, a journalistic and medical 
farce that has been by now translated into 
every language spoken. It is called "The 
System of Dr. Goudru" and deals with the 
strange adventures of two ambitious jour- 
nalists who go to an insane asylum where 
lunatics are treated by a new system, 
which Dr. Gondrou has perfected. 

They meet the doctor, aa they think, and 
his colleague. Professor Plume, and get a 
rather eccentric and bizarre account of his 
system and experiences. 

Just then a bolt of lightning strikes the 
house and thunder is heard. The eminent 
doctor and his colleague writhe on the 
floor and froth at the mouth, and just to 
show their good nature, begin to maul the 
two journalists around, one of them taking 
the eye of his victim for a marble. 

Just when things look decidedly black 
for the journalists, enter the attendants, 
who take the doctor and his colleague back 
to their cells, disclosing the fact that the 
real Dr. Goudrou has been murdered to 
make a holiday for the maniacs. 

Other one-act farces were "Let Ven- 
touse," in which the frisky wife of a 
frisky doctor cut some capers to show that 
her husband was not alone in being frisky, 
and there was a moral playlet "Le Bon- 
huer," by Pierre Heber. 



NEW mCHENS PLAY OPENS 

London, Eng., Sept 14. — The new 
Globe Theatre play, "The Voice from the 
Minaret" by R. S. Hichens, author of 
"The Garden of Allah," is a success not 
only financially but artistically. The play 
has to deal with the influence for good 
that a heart-whole minister of the gospel 
can exert over his protege, who is not so 
heart whole. The play is in three acta, 
preceded by a prologue. The scene ia laid 
in Damascus and England. In the cast of 
the play are Arthur Wontner, Ernest H. 
Hollway, Henry Vibart Norman McKin- 
nell, George Hayes, E. A. Walker, Frank 
Marshall, Marie Lohr, Vane Featherston, 
Ellen O'Malley. 



COCHRAN REHEARSING "MAGGIE" 

London, Eng., Sept 13. — Charles B. 
Cochran will present about the middle of 
October a new play called "Maggie," which 
waa adapted by Fred Thompson and set 
to music by M. Marcel Lattea. Winnifred 
Bates will play the lead, George Graves 
will be leading man and prominent in the 
cast will be Peter Cawtborne and Jack 
Buchanan. 



DECLARE DIVIDEND 

London, Eng., Sept 14. — The board of 
directors of the New Cambridge, Ltd., has 
declared a dividend of 6 per cent on pre- 
ferred shares, and 7% per cent on com- 
mon, with a bonus of 2% per cent on the 
latter. The total profits for the year with 
Government taxes and expenses deducted, 
amounted to $95,000, an increase over last 
year of at least $25,000. 



"GOING UP" CLOSES 

London, Eng., Sept 14. — The popular 
success "Going Up," which came, over here 
from America, closed its run here this week 
to make way for "The Telephone Call," 
which is rehearsing. The new play is from 
the French "Le Coup de Telephone." 



LOUIS STONE BOOKED 
London, Eng., Sept 6. — Louis Stone, 
the American upside down dancer who 
opened here at the Nottingham Palace on 
August 18. has been booked over the 
Moss Empires Ltd., circuit for a fall ex- 
tended tour. 



DALY RETURNS TO LONDON 

Pabis, France, Sept 15. — Arnold Daly, 
who left America several months ago and 
has been In Paris for some weeks, has re- 
turned to London. He may again go to 
New York from that city. 



"REPARATION" OPENS 

London, Eng., Sept. 14. — "Reparation,*' 
a drama by Tolstoy in which John Barry- 
more appeared in America, was produced 
last week at the Grand Leeds, with Henry 
Ainley in the leading role. ' j 

The play, a story of the baser passions 
and the finer points of life, waa a huge 
success, and is due for a long run here. 
It goes from a palace to a drunkard's ken- 
nel without offending the finer sensibilities 
once. The play was produced by Stanley 
Bell, with incidental music by Norman 
O'Neill. In the cast were Miss Agnes 
Thomas, Miss Anna Russell, Mlas Meggie 
Albanesi, Miss Duleie Benson, Mr. Ion 
Swinley, Miss Athene Seyler, Mr. Claude 
Rains, Mr. Henry Ainley, Miss Alice 
Moffat, Miss Anna Filipova, Mr. Richard 
Grenville, Mr. Henry Morrell, Miss Dora 
Gregory, Mr. Otho 'Stuart Miss Marion 
Terry, Mr. Julian Courtville, Mr. Henry 
White, Mr. Ernest Milton, Mr. Howard 
Rose, Mr. Leonard Sickert. 



OPERA COMPANY HAS HARD LUCK 

Caracas, Venezuela, Sept 1L — The 
Mancini Grand Opera Company, which 
opened here on June 21, is in trouble and 
has closed. 

The management jot the company made 
the mistake of opening at the Bull Ring, 
known as the Nuevo Circo de Caracas. 
The stage was too small, which hurt the 
performance. It then moved to the 
Municipal Teatro, and after about ten per- 
formances had to close. Attempts to re- 
organize and give performances were un- 
successful. In the company at the time 
were Zinoveieff, Somiailoff, Seroventi, 
Vigilione, Gagavelli, Paglia, Vergeri, 
Saraya, Garavelli, Puliam, Fernandas, 
Elores and Melia. The directors were 
Buratt and Leotti. In the chorus were a 
number of American singers. 



C.OBORN QUITTING VARIETIES 
London, Eng., Sept 14. — October 24 
will mark the departure of Charles Cobom 
from the variety stage proper. Cobom, 
who is at present making a picture writ- 
ten around his song success, "The Man 
Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo," 
will tour the country in a lectnre-picture- 
eoncert entertainment in which he will be 
assisted by a trio of artists. He will be 
tendered a farewell benefit 



HAS GOOD S. AMERICAN SEASON 

Caracas, Venezuela, Sept 11. — The 
Bracale Grand Opera company, which has 
been appearing here for about six weeks, 
closed this week after a very successful 
run. In the company were the following: 
Hipolito Lazaro, Tfamaki Miura, Guiseppe 
Danise, Maria Galvina. Guiseppe Cam- 
pion! and Ia Taylor. The company is en 
route to Lima, Peru. 



WAR FILMS WERE PROFITABLE 

London, Eng., Sept 14. — The report of 
the government asent the showing of war 
films, shows a profit of $359,875, of which 
$100,000 went to the British Wsr Office 
Charities, $50,000 to the Canadian govern- 
ment, $25,000 to Australia, the same 
amount to New Zealand, South Africa and 
India. All expenses of the War Office 
committee, which controls their exhibition, 
have been paid out of the profits also. 



MAKING HIT IN AUSTRALIA 

Stdnet, Australia, Sept 4. — Emile 
Pollini, who has been appearing here for 
the last sixteen months, has been making 
such a big hit that she has been signed for 
an extra year. 



VARIETY HOUSE CHANGES 

London, Eng.. Sept 12. — The Cborley 
Hippodrome, for .many years a variety 
boose, will, in future, be devoted to mo- 
tion pictures exclusively. 

BOOKED FDR VENEZUELA 

Cakacas, Venezuela, Sept 11. — Sacba 
Piatov and Mile. ! Moskovina. the Russian 
dancers, are to appear at the Teatro Na- 
tional e here soon.. 



22 




TH1 MIW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



and 




' ••''■' ; ' '■■'■■■ . - 



HARRY EDDIE 



HART £ LU 



THE ACT WITH CLASS 
AND REFINEMENT 






Our Sponsor 

and Manager 

SAMMY WARD 



:'■ 






Special Material by 

HERMAN RUBY 

and LEW COUL WELL 



B. F. Keith's COLONIAL Now 

A NEW ACT AND A GOOD ONE 

JACK HANLEY 



"THE FOOLISH FELLOW" 



DIRECTION 



LEO FITZGERALD 



B. F. KEITH'S 81ST STREET THEATRE NOW SEPT. 15 

"IIV SCULPTOR'S GARDEN" 

Producer, Karl Hermes — An Elaborate Posing Production — The Season's Big Novelty — Manager, Irene Hermes. 

Direction, Pete Mack. 



LEO 



THE LADDER LAD 

INTRODUCING THE 

BIG BABY 



FORD & CUNNINGHAM 



DC VAUDEVILLE 



DJ * •■": 

A LAUGH, A TUNE, A STEP * 

DIRECTION-LEO FITZGERALD 



LOOK US OVER 



JOE 



WALTER 



SANDIFER and BROGSDALE 

Comedy Entertainers Direction-Arthur Horwits ud Lee Krans In Vaudeville 



HENDRIX- BELLE ISLE CO. 

In "The Schoolmaster" 

Booked Solid. Direction— ROSE Jk CURTIS 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 




STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 



] 



PREDICTIONS ABOUT STOCK 

, SEASON ARE COMING TRUE 

Number of Companies Increases — Many New Players in Ranks, 
■ Audiences Becoming More Exacting, Plays of Better 
Variety — Big Cities Demanding More Companies 



When the stock season opened on Sept." 
1 predictions regarding it were many, and 
the general outlook was exceedingly good. 
Sigh expectations were In band and many 
promises of a successful season -were held 
oot These have more than been lived up 
to. 

It is estimated that the number of new 
companies in operation now that did not 
exist when the season ended last winter is 
in excess of the half-hundred mark. The 
tendency to support stock companies is fast 
becoming a fad among the larger cities. 

The dose of last season saw but two 
companies in Chicago. The re-opening 
saw five housed in that city, and two or 
three in the suburbs. New York had, 
when the season closed, just two companies 
operating. Today, with the New Xork sea- 
son just beginning, there are seven com- 
panies, including two Jewish, running and 
a number of others under way, with three 



in the nearby suburbs. 

This growing interest in stock is due, 
largely, to the great number of excellent 
actors who have been developed during the 
war period. The young blood seeking an 
introduction to the histrionic world now 
seeks its opportunity in stock. The result 
has been the development of much good ma- 
terial, which might, otherwise, have been 
wasted on Broadway. Stock audiences, 
too, have become very exacting, demanding 
the best there is in ability and plays. 

That this interest in stock is no mere 
optimistic smoke cloud can be proven by 
the tremendous business that the compa- 
nies are doing. Reports from all over the 
that this is so, the demand for new the- 
country indicate that business has never 
been better than it is now. And to prove 
atres, first voiced several weeks ago, is 
growing more persistent every day. 



VIRGINIA BRISSAC OPENS 
Sas Diego, CaL, Sept. 14.— Virginia 
Brissae has her own company at the 
Strand Theatre, this city, and is enjoying 
a good season. The company recently 
opened and has been doing turnaway busi- 
ness since the first show. In the cast 
tie Ferdinand Munier, Edward Ewald, 
Patia Power, Marjorie Bennett, Frances 
Jays, Brady Kline, Fred Raymond and 
Nellie Blanch ard. The company is under 
the management of John Wray. 



PEYTON RETURNING TO BROOKLYN 

Corse Peyton, who for the last three 
or four years has been a stranger to 
Brooklyn stock audiences, will open at 
the Crescent Theatre on Sept. 22, when he 
. produces "Nothing but the Truth," with 
"Daddy Long Legs" to follow. In the 
company will be Marjorie Foster as lead- 
ing lady, Arthur Holman as leading man, 
and Henriette Brown director. 



JOINS COLONIAL PLAYERS 

Lawkence, Mass., Sept. 15. — Harold 
DuFrane is leading man with the Colonial 
Players at the Colonial Theatre, this city. 
Other new members of the cast are Lillian 
Stuart, Walter Scott Weeks, Carrol Daly, 
Byron Hawkins and Charles Danforth. 



COLONIAL PLAYERS TO MOVE 

Pittsfield, Mass., Sept. 6. — The Colon- 
ial Players, who have been holding forth 
at the Colonial Theatre, here, under the 
direction of Nate Goldstein, are to close 
their season here soon and move to Utica 
for the Fall season. They will occupy the 
Park Theatre, which has been decorated 
and painted anew for their arrival. 



"DISRAELI" NOW IN STOCK 

Portland, Maine, Sept. 14. — The pro- 
duction here at the Jefferson Theatre of 
"Disraeli," the George Arliss play, has 
proven a great artistic success. The lead- 
ing role was placed by Robert Gleckler. 
This is the first stock production of the 
play. 



"SEVEN DAYS LEAVE" RELEASED 

"Seven Days' Leave," the military- 
naval play, shown on Broadway, with 
Anthony J. Kelly and Elisabeth Risdon in 
the leading roles, has been released for 
stock, and the first production of it is 
to be made by the Warburton Players, at 
Yonkers, N. Y. 



BECOMES STAGE DIRECTOR 

Lowell, Mass., Sept 8. — Arthur Mack, 
who has recently returned from service in 
France, has decided to stay away, from the 
footlights for a while, and, consequently, 
has been engaged as assistant stage 
director to J. Francis Kirk, at the Opera 
House, this city. He was formerly with 
the Hudson Theatre Stock at Union Hill. 



CHARLESTON STOCK OPENS 

Charleston, W. Va., Sept 141 — Patrick 
Liddy's Plaza Theatre opened its season 
here this week with the Hedges' Musical 
Comedy Stock Company. After four 
weeks of stock the theatre win continue the 
season with a vaudeville policy. 



HOWARD OPENS THIRD COMPANY 

CurcAOO, 111., Sept. 15.— Lorin Howard 
opens a third stock company here to- 
night when his players at the National 
Theatre give their first performance. The 
play is "Johnny Get Your Gun," with 
"Pollyanna" to follow. 

PITT TAKES ORPHEUM, NEWARK 

Charles Pitt has taken the Orpheum, 
Newark, and is doing business there with 
his stock company, which he moved down 
from Hamilton, Ont. This is his third 
week. . 



WILKES PLAYERS DOING WELL 

Denver, Col., Sept 15. — The Wilkes 
Players, who recently opened their season 
at the Denham Theatre, this city, with 
Ruth Robinson and George Barnes in the 
leading positions, is doing very well. The 
hill for this week is "Fair and Warmer." 



ACTOR BECOMES MANAGER 

Tom Wythe, - formerly character - man 
with the Charles" Emerson Players, left 
the roster of -that organization last .week' 
to join Tunney and DeMarra. He is now 
manager for them at the Colonial The- 
atre, Lawrence, Mass. 



JOINS "MARRIAGE QUESTION" 

Emory Blankall, leading man, has been 
engaged for a special part in "The Mar- 
riage Question," and joins the production 
at Johnstown, Pa., on Sept 22. 

THURSTON GOING TO BOSTON 

Thurston, the magician, will open an 
engagement at the Majestic Theatre, 
Boston, on Sept. 22. He will close at the 
Globe on the Saturday night preceding. 

HAS NEW INGENUE 

Dorothy Dunn joins the Warren CHara 
Stock Company in New Bedford on Sept. 
22 as ingenue. 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK REPERTOIRE. AMATEUR COMPANIES, 

LAI GIST ASSORTMENT Df THE WORLD. Books lor boo. 

uiMiol Negro Flajt, P.otr, Scmrr. atr». JuHtr'i Wu 
Works. Catalogs* Frul Fret! Free! 

SAMUXL FRENCH. 38 W«t 3S«h St, N»w York 



JOE 



I3ABELLE 



COFFMAN ^d CARROLL 



"THE PORTER'S TROUBLES" 



DIRECTION-JAM BAERWITZ 



WILLIAM CONWAY 



THE IRISH PIANIST— TN VAUDEVILLE 



Tho Liltfe Magnet in Vaudeville 



GEORGE 



BOOKED SOLID— LOEWS CIRCUIT 



DDL. TOM JONES 



ROBERT 



LE ROY & HARVEY 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



ALTHOFF SISTERS 



TWO GIRLS AND THE PIANO 



DIRECTION-HARRY 



ADONIS & CO. (?) 

A NEW ARTISTIC NOVELTY 

DIRECTI ON-ARTHUR KLEIN 



CONNOLLY & FRANCES 



Fob an* Movie. Jasdaff tho Harmonica and Grandma's KaTBdaon. Direcnoo-ManbM * Rom 

— CALLAHAN BROS. 



EAST— LAURENCE SCHWAB 



WEST— C. W. NELSON 



HARRY OAKS &: CO 

In the Comady Classic, "Bohind tho Fotoro" 
SOLID KEITH TIME DIRECTION JACK 



DAN MICHAELS 



baa all star cast Moaical 



NEW YORK FOLLIES 

Comedy EBtstUd "A LITTLE Bit OF EVERYTHtNC" 
Two Acts and Twaira J 



LESSON IN PHYSICAL CULTURE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TECHOW'S CATS 



TN VAUDEVILLE 



ED and EDNA FANTON 

In a dainty aerial oddity. Dir. Sam Baarwits 

SMILETTA SISTERS 

NOVELTY PE LUXE PI VAUDEVILLE 

MILDRED ROGERS 

The Dainty Miss in 5 Feet of D ancmg 

DrRECTJON-ABE FEDOEJU 

IRENE LEARY 

INGENUE • ' , BURLESQUE REVIEW 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 




)if 1 1 iw^ 



A DIFFERENT 
Blues 

"OLD 
JOE 

BLUES" 

A "PUNCH" 

IDEA 

and MELODY 



"Bigger" and Newer 
Than Ever 

Brand New 
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"Bring 

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CHICAGO 

Chester Carpenter 

240 Woodward At*. 
DETKOrr, MICH. 



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232 WEST 46th STREET, NEW YORK 

L. WOLFE GILBERT President 

MAXWELL SILVER Gen'IMgr. 

TOM MARTIN, 240 Tranmt St., BOSTON, MASS. 



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829 Chestnut St. 
PHILADELPHIA 

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SAN FRANCISCO 



A Brand 



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THE ORIGINAL IDEA OF THIS ACT IS FULLY PROTECTED, ANY INFRINGEMENT WILL BE PROSECUTED BY LAW. 
SPECIAL SCENERY LYRICS and MUSIC by AL.-W. BROWN 




MERRILEES ±^R DORIA 



GEMS OF SONG AND OPERA 



Haunting. Dreamy, Sensational '5' 



BOOKING 

DRAWING POPULATION OVER 3—,—e 




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Capacity 1900. Playing only Legitimate Attractions First Three days and 
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HAWAII A/N C*\00Ci LIGHT 

Chicago McKlNLEY MUSIC-COMPANY New York 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



Lillian Mortimer and company will aoon 
start a tour of the Loew houses. 

Mathews and Heiler, man and woman, 
will do a new song and dance offering. 

Mauray Meyers is now handling the 
publicity for the New York office of Sol 
Lesser. 

Lawrence Orossmith and I. H. Brewer, 
have been added to the cast of "Too Many 
Husbanda." 



McLaughlin and Evans will open next 
week on the Loew circuit under the direc- 
tion of Tom Jones. 

Madlyn Worth, of the "Social Follies," 
while playing the Gayety, Brooklyn, was 
given a $1,400 Essex Six. 

Because her voice went "bad," Aileen 
Stanley was unable to pmy the last half 
of the Fifth Avenue last week. 



Eva Puck has been engaged for the 
leading feminine role of "Just a Minute," 
John (Sort's new musical comedy. 

Marion Harris was married last week to 
Robert Williams, owner of several Little 
Theatres throughout the country. 

Perry Van, a singer, has been discharged 
from the service and is preparing a new 
single singing act for vaudeville. 

J. H. Harms, an actor, is in the hos- 
pital at San Francisco, due to injuries re- 
ceived in an automobile accident. 



Theodore Bekefi and Sophie Scherer, 
Russian dancers, are the feature of the 
show at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 

Fred Mooie, manager of the Apollo 
Theatre, Atlantic City, is recovering from 
the sudden illness with which he was at- 
tacked last week. 

Fannie Sice has been appearing in pic- 
tures since her return from Australia. She 
intends to return to vaudeville with her 
Cabinet of Celebrities. 



Dollie White, last season with Frank 
Lalor's "Aviator Girls" company, is being 
sought by Mrs. Gussie Shutta, of 16 At- 
lantic street, Newark, N. J. 



The Lafarnce Brothers, who have been 
playing in the East all last season, re- 
turned to Chicago last week and were 
booked by the W. V. M. A. 

Georgie Jessel, the comedian, 'has been 
placed under a three-year contract by 
the Shuberts, because of the hit he made 
in the reopening of "The Gaieties." 

Powell, the magician, will head his own 
magical show, under the direction of 
Jules Larvett, starting next month. He 
will tour through the middle west. ' 

Mrs. Tom Kelly, formerly known as 
Violette and a partner of the famous 
Irish comedian, is seriously ill in a hos- 
pital in San Francisco following a major 
operation. 



"Dippy Biers" and Flo Bennett, a Hip- 
podrome feature last season, and who 
went to England in May, have been booked 
till March, 1920, playing Christmas week 
in Dublin, Ireland, Diers' home town. 

George and May La Favre have been 
booked for a tour of the Western Vaude- 
ville Managers' Association time," opening 
September -14 at the Orpheum Theatre, 
Collinsville, HI. 

Jess Dandy, Richard Barbee, Felix 
Krembs, Marie Reichart, Ethel Remey and 
Marcelle Nelken are in the cast of 
"Friendly Enemies," now at the Manhat- 
tan Opera House. 



WiB Reed Dunrey has been appointed 
publicity agent for the Lorin Howard 
Flayers' stock companies, which are -di- 
viding their time between the Imperial 
and Victoria theatres,- two outlying Chi- 
cago playhouses. 



ABOUT YOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



Letts Vorke will be seen in the cast of 
"Just a Minute." 

Nan Halperin has been signed for the 
"Frivolities of 1919." 



Marion Door, of "A Lonely Romeo," is 
all at her home in Boston. 



Leon De Costa is writing the lyrics and 
music for "111 Say She Does." 

Lillian Russell has taken an apartment 
for the Winter at the Hotel Majestic. 



William B. Howland, last season with 
Bert Bakey has joined Basil Lynn's act. 

Una Fleming has been re-engaged as 
premiere danseuse in "The Velvet Lady." 

Racheal Crothers has returned to New 
York after a vacation in the Westchester 
Hills. 



Clarence Hibbard, the minstrel, will be 
seen in a new act on the small time this 
season. 



Robert J. Maurice has been booked for 
an extended season with his own show, 
"Ideas and Ideals." 



John Liddy, after spending two weeks 
in the Maine woods, has returned to his 
work at the N. V. A. 

Jack Emerson has been engaged by 
Klaw and Erlanger for George C. Tyler's 
production of "Penrod." 

Alma Francis has been engaged for a 
part in "My Once In a While, which An- 
ton Scibilia is producing. 

Alex Sater, formerly pianist at Reisen- 
weber's, has decided to take a flier in 
vaudeville as a musical conductor. 



Grace Nolan, sister of Mrs. Sam Harris 
and Mrs. George M. Cohan, will open in 
"A Prince There Was" this week. 



John Wenger, at present art director of 
the Rivoli, has. been engaged as art 
director for the Capitol Theatre. 

John Paule Jones is playing the part of 
Mel Frazer and also directing the number 
two company of Walter Hast's "Scandal." 



Lola Fisher has been signed on a long- 
term contract by George C. Tyler, and 
will open in November in a new play by 
Clare Kummer. 



Herbert Clifton, Kitty McLaughlin, Ar- 
turo Ugaro, O'Hanlon and Zambonia are 
in the cast of "The Revue of Varieties" 
at the Palais Royal. 



Mabel McCane- is scheduled to open her 
vaudeville season-. September 22, at Mt. 
Vernon. She will be assisted by Ken and 
Weston and Billy Taylor. 

Trixie Raymond has been promoted to a 
principal after being in the chorus of the 
Winter Garden for five years. She is now 
in the "Monte Cristo, Jr.," cast. 

Alfred A. Aarons, general manager for 
Klaw and Erlanger, was presented with a 
diamond, platinum ring and a poem by 
the cast of "La La Lucille" last week. 



Margie Dillon, a member of Harry Hast- 
ings "Kewpie Dolls," is making her first 
appearance in burlesque in New York this 
week at the Star, Brooklyn. She was for- 
merly in vaudeville. 

Otto Henkel, stage manager for the 
Shuberts before he entered the Govern- 
ment service, will not go back to his 
previous work when discharged. He has 
accepted the American agency for 
"Champblanc," a French non-intoxicant 
champagne. 



Harry Delmore, of Delmore and Rack- 
et t, is vacationing at Lake Hopatcong. 

Dorothy Maynard has been engaged for 
the cast of "She's a Good Fellow" this 
season. 



Fannie Brice has been engaged by Flo. 
Ziegfeld for the "Nine O'clock Revue" and 
"Midnight Frolic." 



Sam Wright is doing Dutch opposite 
George Niblo in "The Midnight Maidens." 
He replaced Sam Lewis. 

DeMarr and Swann joined the cast of 
"The Lady in Red" at the Whitney Opera 
House, Syracuse, Saturday night. 

The Dorana filled in for Berk and Valda 
at the Palace last week, after the latter 
cancelled due to an injury to Berk's ankle. 

Richard Pyle came back to New York 
last week, after a six months* stay in 
Chicago, where she appeared in "Angel 
Face." 



Jacques Rubiroff, solo violinist in "Fid- 
dlers Three," is giving a concert recital in 
New Haven prior to rejoining the company 
for its new season. 



The Andre Sisters, who recently opened 
in vaudeville in a new act called "Dance- 
land," have signed to appear in motion 
pictures for the Biograph. 

L. B. O'Shaughnessy, a Broadway news- 
paper man, has opened offices as a pub- 
licity expert, and is now located at 25 
West Forty-second street. 

Jack Meyrowitz, known professionally 
as Jack Miner, has been engaged to ap- 
pear in a new musical comedy which Dor- 
othy Donnelly is producing. 

Thomas Walters, who said he is an 
actor, was fined $100 last week by Justices 
Moss, CKeefe and Collins in Part Six of 
the Court of Special Sessions. 

Jack Wiener, formerly on the road with 
"Sweeties," has been made general man- 
ager of the W. B. Friedlander attractions, 
and has assumed his new duties. 



Marjorie Stanley has joined the "Jack 
o' Lantern" company which has just 
opened at the Detroit Opera House. She 
was formerly with Julian Eltinge's show. 

Chaa. Callahan, who, during the last, 
month, has been entertaining returned 
soldiers under the auspices of the K. of 
C, is back in the cast of "The Royal 
Vagabond." 

Maurice B. De Packh, the orchestrator, 
a protege of Frank Sadler, was married 
last Saturday in Brooklyn to Miss Val- 
entine Thropp, a member of the Ziegfeld 
"Follies" company last season. 

Alvia Baker, Dixie Mason, Sophie Ben- 
nett, Oro Keeler and a chorus of eight, 
will constitute the new revue that Arthui 
Hunter, is putting on at the Piccadilly 
restaurant, Newark, under the direction 
of Chris Pender. 



R. George Burnett, who, since his de- 
mobilization from the British Army, has 
been associated with the Chamberlin 
Brown office, is playing the role formerly 
filled by Cyril Chadwick in "The Dancer." 
He will not sever his association with the 
Brown office, however. 



Bob Williams, who is Ensign Harry A. 
Tyburc in the TJ. S. Navy, has returned 
from France, after a stay of five months, 
and is stationed at Bay Ridge Barracks. 
He is planning to return to the profession 
with a Hawaiian band of fourteen pieces 
under the supervision of the' Navy De- 
partment, 



MaxfiRTElttott arrived in New York on 
the Aquitania from England last week. 

Clarence Hibbard, black-face comedian, 
is preparing a new act and will soon open. 

Frank Bacon, eo-aathor of "Lightnin'," 
and one of the cast, has been made a star. 

Betty HaD, the Rag a-Jax girl from 
Dixie, is billed to open in a single next 
week. 



Frank J. Shields has been given a route 
over the Pantages Cireuit. He opens 
Oct. 6. 



B. A. Myers is now located in Bert 
LaMont's offices, having rented desk room 

there. 



Jean and Katherine King have a new act 
which they are presenting in the Fox 
houses. 



Doyle and Elaine have been routed to 
play all of the Pantages' time. They open 
Sept. 29. 

Robert Edeaon has the leading role in 
"The Woman in Room 13," which opened a 
tour in Brooklyn Monday night. 

Sybil Carmen, formerly at the Midnight 
Whirl, at the Century Grove, and Maurice 
S. Revues were married last week. 

Dugan and Raymond, who will appear 
in a new act Bhortly, are having a new 
setting made by Kahn and Bowman. 

Gladys Sears, who returned from over- 
seas several months ago, has been doing 
a "single" around the camps recently. 

Davis and Ross are presenting "At the 
Song Booth," a new act by J. .Wolford 
Barry. The turn is due in New York 
shortly. 



Lillian Bomstein, of the Arthur Lyons 
office, had a bag with $6 in cash and 
several small articles stolen from her desk 
last week. 



Pete Sinopoulo, manager of the Lyric, 
Oklahoma City, and brother of John Sino- 
poulo, was married there last week to 
Ruby Tate. 

Knowles and Roberts have a new act in 
which they will open shortly on the Loew 
Circuit.. It is being booked by Charles J. 
Fitzpatrick. 

Agatha Debussy, formerly a model for 
Haskell Coffin, has been engaged for the 
cast of "Just a Minute," John Cort'a musi- 
cal production. 

* — -^— 
Josephine Whitteii, Lama -Hamilton, 
Frank Crumit, Irving Beebe and Kelson 
Riley have been engaged by Stewart and 
, Morrison for ?The Love Lamp." 

Solly Burke, of Burke and Valda, hurt 
his knee last Tuesday and was forced to 
withdraw from the bill at the Palace. They 
were replaced by The Dancing Dorana. 

Edith Kingman, concert singer, sent to 
New York for detectives last week to help 
her find who wrote anonymous and insult- 
ing letters which she received while in 
.Boston. 



Amelia Bingham has resigned from the 
cast of "At 0:45" at the Playhouse, so that 
the performer who originally filled the 
role and was with the strikers may rejoin 
the cast. 



Aurelio Bodini, tenor of the Chicago 
Opera Company last season," arrived Tin 
America last week, and was held by the 
emigration officials. He was to sing at 
the Metropolitan this season. 

iThil it not a Fact Powdtr) 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



"MY CASTLES IN THE AIR 
ARE TUMBLING DOWN" 



Refrain fcl i iw r «M at ki mtt «xf rmfea) 



WORDS BY 

ARTHUR J. LAMB 

! 




MUSIC BY* 

W. C. POLLA 



A SURE-FIRE NATURAL HIT: 



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can bo longer care, Uj ot-lki In U» mir are tmn-bliee; dews. They were died with 




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Al-thC ay heart la bro- ran.- I do notion. 



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USE IT WHILE IT'S NEW! 

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PROF. MGR. 

C. C. CHURCH & CO. 

153 W. 48th St., NEW YORK, N. Y. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICES: HARTFORD, CONN. 



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-JPifJ— *g by" CL C Chuck * Ca,nteitor(!.e«Bi.,aE. A. . 



EIVI1VI A KRAUSE 



5 HONEY GIRLS 

DIRECTION-JACK FLYNN 



JIMMY CASSON 



The AMERICAN ACE off SONG, 
with FRED KLEM at the PIANO 



SUZANNE & ERNEST 

SICKELMORE LE MESSURIEH 

In "Studio Fancies" 



HUBERT KINNEY & CORINNE 

Singing and Dancing — Direction Rosalia Stewart 



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Doing a new act. Material and staged by Win. Siato 



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FROM OVER THERE 

On tba Lm Time— Thank* to Geo. Sonanaki 



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Nicknamed in die A. E. F. as "Irresistible Sue" 



LOOK US OVER 

JOHN & NELLIE OLMS 

The Watch Wizards 

Di VAUDEVILLE 



AN N O U N G E ME NT EXTRAORDINARY 

RAY ALVINO ZZ JAZZ PHIENDS 

Formerly with Bessie a»yton; Jean Sawyer, Detainee Ream, Breadway. A sensatios »' 
tbe Teck. Buffalo. Exponents of "Jan witheat Jan." Open Jar tba season of uis-ira 
DAVE SCHWARTZ. Musical Director, Suite SO, SB) FUth Ave, N. W. Car. end Su N. Y. 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



B . F. KEITH VAUDE. EXCHANGE 

HEW YORK CTTY. 

Palace— Ford Sisters. (Seren to 811.) 

Eirenrino Miller A Gerard— M Inglia— Her- 
mlno Shone Co. — Gantlet's Bricklayers — J. Bnurj 
* Co. " ' * ' ■ " 

Colonial — Geo. Boswner— Moscont Bra. — Ben Ber- 
tie — Bordonl * Kin — Four Meyakoe — Baa Samuela 
^ Duval * Symond* — Bessie Clifford. 

Alluunbre— Hunting & Frenete — Vlnle Daley— 
A Jnhnantv- 




BfGXt Wfe^efe 



Deris & Darnell — Sertai * Gordon— Klein Bros. 

Brjin * BioderRk— Howard A Clark— P. A.M.- 
Brltton. 

Royal— Dooley A Sales — Miner * Bradford— 
gmllv DarreU — Valerie Bergere Co. — Nora, Jane * 
Co — Olsen * Johnson — Booney A Sutler. 

SXOOXLTX, ST. T. 

Bueliwiok— Helena Deris — BrendeU A Bart—' 
Breen Famllr — Chaa. Kins * Co. — Brennan * Bole 

—Sam Llebert * Co Imhoff, Conn A Cor. 

Orphenm — Herman A Shirley — Stanley A Blmea 
—Qulxy Four — "Kiss Me" — Walter C. Kelly — 
Harriet Bempel * Co. — Grace La Hue. 
BOSTON. 
Keith's— Camilla's Birds— Jaaaland Naval Eight 
— e:h. Murray — Lee Koblmann * Co. — Plerlert A 
SeoOeld— Cameron Sisters — Lew Dockstader — H. * 
A. Seymour— DaFor Boys. 

BUFFALO. 
ghee's— BUly Olason — Dora. Brenner — Hughe* 
Dos— Prosper * Moret — "(5000 a Tear" — Gal* 
kgber A Roley — Claire at Atwood. 
BALTIMORE. 
Karylasd — Two Jesters — Frisco 4 Band — B. A B. 
Conrad — Walters A Walters — William Gaxton A 
Co. — Rinaldo Bros. — Jim Jan Kins — Ames A Win* 
throp— Walter Weem a. 

CXXVELAHD. 
Hippodrome — Josephine A Henninga — Iibonati — 
Pegjy Brennan A Co. — Belle Baker — Aeahl Troop* 
—Jack Kennedy A Co. — Wa rd A Tan. 
CINCINNATI. 
Keith's— Briscoe A Raob — E. A E>- Adair— Daw- 
soa A 81a. A Stern— MarU Lo— McShayne A Hatha- 

way— Great Johnson. 

COLUMBUS* 
Keith's — Ann Gray— Primrose Four— Wright A 
Dietrich. 

DATTON. 
Kaith'e— Alan Sogers — Bath Badd. 

DETROIT. 
Temple — Myers A Noon — Rath Boye — Taylor A 
QrmttoD— Amant Broa. — Mason A Owynne — Stare 
Id Toyland — Ely — Geo. A. Moore. 
■Bat 
CsleaUl — Valser A Dyer — Santo* A Hayes— May 
Potter A Co. — Vernon A Davenport — Zardo. 

SBAI9 lAroa. 
..Empress — Eleanor A Winjams — The Magloys— 
Camming* A White — U. B. Fleet Jess Band- 
Everest Circos. 

HAlsTLTOH. 
Lyric — Jack LaVler— Jos. Bernard A Co. — Fln- 
Isy A HBJ— Joe Towle — "Artistic Treat"— Kirk- 
smith Sisters. 

INDIANAPOLIS. 
Keith's — Clark A Bergman — Reynolds A Donegsn 

— Bobble A Nelson — Chaa. Wilson — Hobaon A 
Bestty. 

LOUISVILLE. 

Keith's— Owen McGlreney— Loose A Sterling— 
Chs«. A. Hearn Co. — Frank Gabby, 
MWEU. 
Keith's — Creasy A Dayne — Barry Girls — KarteTJl 
—Powers A Wellaee^-S. Shaw— The Brlants— 
Dtnclng Kennedys. 

MONTREAL. 
Princess — Wilbur Mack Co. — Hamilton A Barnes 
—Brown Slater*. 

PORTLAND. 
Keith's— Lid* McMillan Co.— Pletro— Margaret 
Pad ola— J. C. Morton Co. — Jordan Girls— Boothby 
* Everdetn. . 

PROVIDENCE. 

Keith's— MeMabon. Diamond Co. — Walter Brewer 
— Pstrleols— Fallon A Brown — Chaa. Grapewtn A 
Co.— "Rainbow Cocktail" — Texas Comedy Four — 

aUrsno Bros. . ^^ 

' si m i.ar\wr.w *TTe 

Keith's— Smith A Austin — Herbert's Dogs — Co- 
lumbia A Victor— ChappeTJe A Btlnette— TJ. 8. Glee 
Cloti — Margaret Toons; — Williams A Wolfua — Bee 
Palmer A Co. ' • 

PTTTSBTTRGH. 
Davis— Alice Hamilton— Mr*. W.'l Surprise— 
Adolphos A- Co. — Fen ton A Field s. 
ROCHESTER. 
Temple— Valentine A Bell — Ssmpsel A Leonhart 
—Foot Marx Bros. — Wallace Galrin — J*ne Cottr- 
thope Co.— H. Trix A Bis ter— J ackie A Billy. 
SXatAOUBB. 
Temple — Ernmett, DeVoy A Co. 

TOLEDO. 
Keith's— Diamond A Brennan— Juggling Nelsons 
— Ssllle Fiaber A Co. — Harvey. Henay A Grayee— 
Lew Hawkins— McLellan 4 Carson— Maude Earl* 
ACo. 

TORONTO. 
Shea's— NltU Jo— Eadie A Bamaden— CNelU A 
Keller — Shaw A Campbell — Shaw A Campbell — 
Rokoma — Jason A Hale — Joe Brownlni. 
WASHINGTON. 
Keith's— Jnlla Kelety— "For Pity'a Sekes"— The 
Maaterslngers — Sablni A Goodwin — Barr Twine — - 
Eddie Foy A Co. — Los Bodrtqoes — Shirley Sister*. 
WTLMXHGTOH. 
Garrlek— Los Bodrlqnea— Kelso A Lelghtoa— Hal- 
. Wo A Hunter — Morleln — Wilson Aubrey Three — 
"Janet of France"— LaTemple A Co.— Peterson. 
Kennedy AM" 
_ TOUaTGBTOWH. 

Hippodrome — Mary Howard A Co. — Stella May- 
hew — M. A J. Dunedln — Leon Varrara — Johnnie 
Clark Co.— Bowman Broa.— Chung Hwa Four. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO. JXL. 

Palace — Geo. MacFarlane— Indoor Sports— Bock- 
well A Fox — Bradley A Ardlne — Nina Payne- 
Meredith A Snooser. 

Majestic— Frank Dobaon A tB ieni B mrn* A 
Frablto— Lambert A Ball— Hngh Herbert Co. — 
Frtscoe — Miller A Capman — Le Boe A Dupree. 

Stat* Lake— Grenadier Girls— Billy Bouncer's 
Circus — Al Raymond — Dave Ferguson Co. 

CALOARY AND VICTORIA, flaaTATIl. 

Orphenm— SweetJea— Comfort A King— Norwood 
* Hall— Khsmm— Albertlna Baach — Bob A Tip — 
Meinott Duo— James J. Morton. 
DES MOINES. 

Orpheom— Gertrude Hoffman— Ben A Hind 



Mann— Merrlt A Bidewrll— Three Jahna— William* 
ATMltcheO— Th* Ptekfo rda. 

- .2* . - . DENVER. 
Orpheun— Mollie Mclaryre A Co.— Gibson A Cow 
nelU — "VlanoviUe" — Oscar Lorraine — Madge Malt- 
land — Eltrids — Wynn — Lombertl. 
DULUTH. 
Orphaum— TJ. 8. Jan Bud— Stereo* A HoUla- 

ten J1 J Saro A Co. — BrgottT* Lilliputians — 

Weber A Ridsor— Robbie Gordone— Lydell A 
Macey. 

mrswaaa CTXT. 

Orphenm — Oreneaa Rerne — Jania A Chaplow — 
Collins A H»rt— Clifford A Wills— Lacbman Sla- 
ters — Juggling Nelson — Harry nines. 
LINCOLN. 

Orphenm— Harry Wltson A Co.— Nelson A Chain 
—Oliver A dp— Mason A Forrest— Bailey A Cowan 
— Chinese Bra** Band— The Bradna*. 
LOB. ANGEXES. 

Orphean— Bronson A Baldwin — "Heartland" 

Chock Beisner— Nell Lock-wood— Lloyd A Christie 
— "Putting It Over"— Tina Lerner— Mclntoah A 



MIXWAUXXZ. 

Chandler — Borain's Rasaians — 
Bdaie Roes — Stampede Rider* — Orren A Drew — 
Lawton. 

Majeatic— Alan Brook* Co. — Sherman, Van A 
Hyman— Al A F. Stedman — Jas. Thompson Co. — 
Cartmell A Harris — Emerson A Baldwin — Musical 

Hunter*. 

MINNEAPOLIS. 

Orpherrm -Blossom Seeley A Co. — Harry Green 
A Co. — Arthur West A Co. — ». A O. _ 
"The Sterlings" — Shela Terry Co. 



Orphanm- Blgoletto Bros. — Master Gabriel Co. — 
Cortnne Tllton — Jerome A Herbert — Edith Clifford 
— Kitner A Beaney — Radish. 

BXW ORLEANS. 
Orphsmn — Morgan Dancer* — Dolly Ray — White- 
Seld A Ireland — Bender A Meehan — Van Cellos — 
En oa F rarer. 

OAKLAND. 
Orphenm — Bessie Clayton Co. — Lydla Barry — 
Will Ward A Girls— Boyce Combe— "Leritatlon" — 
Royal Gascolgnes. 

OMAHA. 
Orphenm — "Reckless Ere" — Edwin George — 
Murphy A White — Hal Davis A Co. — Alexandria — 
Mile. Nadje — Geo. Price. 

PORTLAND. 
Orphenm— Mme. Bill* A Co.— Belgian Trio— Carl 
Jorn— "Tango Shoe*" — Begay A Lorraine Sisters 
— Ja Da Trio — Burt A Rosedale. 
FRISCO. 
Orphenm — Alice Eli A Co. — Naab A O'Donnell — 
— Ted Doner — Dunham A O'Malley — Geo. Kelly A 
Co. — Bon King A Co. — Jolina Tannen — Bay Snow 
— Dunbar's Tennessee Ten. 

ST. FAUX. 
Orphenm — Trlxie Frlganxa — Harry Holman A 
Co. — Lloyd A Well* — Harry Ros e Net* Johnson — 
Brodean A Silvermooo — Era Shirley A Band. 
SEATTLE. 
Orphenm — Stone A Kali* — Malet* Bonconl — Sybil 
Vane — Harry Breen — Mra. Gene Hughes A Co.— 
Dell A Wood. 

8T. LOUTS. 
Orpheum — Spanish Dancer*— Henry B. Toomer 
Co. — Bernard A Duffy — Claodla Coleman — Juliet — 
O'Donnell A Blair— Phina Co.— Sella Broa. 
SALT LAKE OUT. 
Orphenm— Marguerita Sylra— Marlon Harris — 
La Bernlda A Co. — Mike Bernard — Gallagher A 
Martin — 8teve Julian — Cli nton Sister*. 

SACRAMENTO, STOCKTON. FRE8H0. 
Orphenm (2 days each) — Haig A WaldroD— 
"Current of Fun" — B. A I. Crelgbton — Sutter A 
Den — Haydon A Ercelle. 



Orphenm— "Not Yet Marie"— Martell* — Sydney 

A Townley— Donald Roberts— Farrell Taylor A 
Co.— Fern King A Co.— Jack Morrissey. 



Orphenm — Saranoff A Winter Garden Glrla — 
The Sharrocks— William Eha— Kanuawa Boy*— 
tee A Cranston— "Colour Gems" — Carl Emmy'* 
Pet*. 

POU CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT. _„ 

Foil— Swarta A Clifford— Mimic World. (Last 
Half— Plunkett A Bate— Kellman A O'Dsre— J. 
Rosamond Johnson A Co. 

Plasm— -BUly Young A Co. — League of Nation*. 
(Last Half)— Leater A Vincent — Alexander A 
Mack. 

HARTFORD. 

Palace— Lewis A Norton— Tracy A McBrlde— 
Loner Haskell— K. of C. Octette. (Last Half) — 
Henry J. Kelly— Lcagne of Nation*— Fay Court- 
ney A Co. : . 
NEW HAVES. 

Palace— Plunkett A 8*tes — Kellman A O'Dare 
—J. Rosamond Johnson A Co. (Last Half)— 
Tracy A MeSrtde— Swarta A Cliffords. 

Bijou— Lester A Vincent — t Cliffords — Alemder 
A Mack— Hill A Aekerman. (Last Half— Mimic 
World. 

SCBASTON. 

Fell— Helen Jaekley— MallaUr McCarthy A Co. 
— Eckert A Moore. (Last Half) — Three Alreret- 
tss— Saxton A Farrell— Ethel Mae Han A Co. — 
MoCormick A WlnehllL 



Falaos— Hubert Dyer A Partner— Jessie Bead — 
Ritchie St. Onge — Smith A Kaufman — Dangerous 
Dan MbOraw. (Last Half)— Martin A Florence — 

ft Tohla — Loney Haskell— Mile. Dore* 

WATERBTJRT. 
Poll— Henry J. Kelly — Frisco Trio — Fir* Ameri- 
can Girls. (Last BalO—'AL Leater A Co.— Jeans) 
Reed— K of C Octette. 



PoU — Msrtln A Florence — Sooth A Tobln— Fsy 
Courtney A Co. (Last HalO— * Cliffords— Lewis 
A Norton — Dangerous Dan MoQrsw sawaws A 
Kaufman— Hubert Dyer A Partner. 

Pill*— Al Leater A Co. — Mardo A Hunter. (Last 

Half) — Alrera Slaters — BUly Young A Co. Hill 

A Aekerman. 

PROCTOR'S CIRCUIT 

(Week of Sept- IB) 
HEW YORK CITY. 

Slat Street— Gallagher A Roley — Billy Jackson 
— Clinton A Kooney — RJaoa A Co. — Sculptor's Gar- 
den — Charlie Enrin. 

Harlem Opera House— Mick A Earl— Barbette— 
Sheldon Brook*— Tow Newn — FUlli Fsmlly — Hol- 
land A Bay— Frank MnUane— Spink A Tato — a 
Dancing Demons — 8 Military Maids. 

ltfth Strut— Lester Raymond Co. — Bert How- 
ard — Statxer A Craig— Craig A Stelger— Hendricks 
Belle Isle — Arthur Hsrel Co. — Gallarlnl Slaters— 
Garfield A Smith— Walters A Walters— Mullen A 
Franrd*— Larrey Bil ey . 

Mth Street— Lee Stoddard— Diamond A Grand 
Dgtr. — Bessie Remple — Mel Craig— I Araloa— 
Carry A Orsham — 3 Herbert Slaters — Worth Watt- 
ins; 4 — Will Armstrong— Jack Marley — Graham A 
Graham. 

Grand Street— PerrUT* Dogs— Nestor A Vincent 
— Mlsuma Jap*. 

**ret Street — Roger* A Lamm— Spink A Tata— 
4 Dancltrg Demons — Dsrrow — Decortons — J. C. 
Mack— Lucky Brueh— Fouhbkeepiie— Field Sisters 
— KeUy A Klein. 

Toakers — Worth Waiting 4 — ***nT**j*Ji atont- 
gomery— Howsrd A Clark— Frank A M. Brltton— 
LaPolln— Lee Stoddard— Rogers A Lamm— Wilbur 
Swestman— Frisk A Lloyd— Wayen A Warren 
Girls — Mystic Hanson S. 

Xt, Vernon — 2 Jesters — Mullen A Francis — 
"Only Girl"— Wilbur Swestman Co. — LeyoUss— 
Roth Roye — Dnfore Bros. — Howsrd A Clark— Phil 
Baker — Daquesne A Co. 

Flftn Arenue— Larry Riley— Kresaler. Klalsa A 
Saxe— BUly Rhodes — Qnlnn A Carerly— Whiting 
A Bnrt— Dennis Broa. — Mack A Earl — Barbette — 
Kralg A Stalger— Tracy A McBrlde— May Want. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Greenpolnt — Mra. Bra Fay — Piano A Fellow* — 
• Military Maids — Alleen Stanley — Masters A 
Kraft — Morgan A Gatoa — Dona A Tslnska Msl 
nortec A Leedom. 

Prospect— Earl Blcard— Dnfore Broa.—, Trarar* 
A Donglaa— Took A Clair — Bncmesno A Co. — 
Vlney Daley — Bessie Remple — Qnlnn A Carerly — 
Master* A Kraft. 

Halssy— Bd. Badger — Hoyt S— Hall A Brown— 
4 Cliffords— Melnotte A Leedom — Erford'a Golden 
Whirl— Merrigan A Howorth — Art Smith— Prant 
Maye A Co. — I Woodrow Girls — Hawkaley, Bron- 
son A Somers — The Voyagers. 

ALBANY, M. T. 

Wntmr A Like — Brown A Jackson — Amea' A 
Wlnthrop— Ryan A Healey — Santoa A Hsyes— Syl- 
rester Sehaeffer^ — Modem Mirage — Lane A Harper 
— Whipple Houston — Corinthians — Sabine A Good- 
win — J. Boa. Johnson Co. 

AUBURN, M. T. 

J. I. Melra— H. Davenport Co.— Nip A O'Brien— 
Carmen's Minstrels— Exposition 4— Begal A Mack 
— Dobba A Welch — Concert Berne. 

ALLEGHANY . PA. 
Day A M Harklns — Reeves A Arnold. 
ALTOONA. PA. 

2 Esrls — Fred Elliott — John Winnie Hennlngs— 
TJ. S. Carol* 3 — S Twin* — Helen Jaekley— Mc- 
cormick A Wlnehlll— Grey A Byron— June A L 
Martin — Arthur Finn A Co. 

ALLENTOWN. PA. 
WlloUa A MAhalalo— Mable 'A Jno. Dove— An- 
derson A Bnrt— Brennan A Bale— Dewolf A Nel- 
son — Althoff Sisters — "Honor Thy Children" — Al. 
Sbayne — Axalea. The. 

BTNGHAMTOH, PA 
Geo. Alexander — Waiman A Berry — Coakley A 
Dnnlery — Barns A Garry. 

HUDOCTOET, OOXsT. 

3 Beauties— Jeaxie Reed — Demarest A Collette 
— Hehrert Dyer Co. — Car 11 U— Octavo— Keen A 
White — Lewis A Norton— K of C Octetta— Biny 
Young Co. — McCormlck A Wallace— Sylra* t*T 
Family— Raymond Wylie Co. 

CAMDEN, V. J. 
The Belmont* — 3 Manning Slater — W. Fenner 
Co.— Ed. Foyer— Jumble Inn — Rudlnoff — Welle, 
Virginia A West— Chinese Jags S— Billy Gleaaon 
—Melody of Tooth. 

CHEBTER, PA. 
Rudlnoff— Wells. Virginia A West— Chinese Jss* 
3— BUly Glssoo— Melody of Tooth— S Melfords— 
3 Manning Slater* — W. Fenner Co. — Ed. Foyer — 
Jnnsble Inn. 

CANTON, OHIO. 
Margo A Francis— GIB A Vesk— "5,000 a 
Tear"— Jean Barloa— Billy Elliott— Adolnbns Co. 
EASTON, PA. 
Kennedy A Nelson — Althoff Sister* — "Honor Thy 
Children" — Anst, Stanley — Sterling Saxo 4— Wl- 
kolla A Kalaahln— Mabla A Jno. Dove— Anderson 
A Bart — Brennan A Rnle — Ere A Mike. 
jrrjZABXXH. n. j. 
Dotson — All 8parks Co. — Clark A Lerere — One- 
Cent Sale — -Valdareo— Earl Blcard — James B. Car- 
son — Brooks A George. 

ZZXXXA, N. T. 
Delano A Pike— Lottie Grooper — Boh A Robin- 
son— County Officials— J. A I. Melca— Geo. Alex- 
ander — Charles Abeam Troupe. 

HARRISBTJRG, PA. 
Helena, Jaekley— McCormlck A Wlnehlll— Green. 
Miller A Green— EUs Bard 3— Fred EUlott— John 
A W. nrsinlnfs IT 8. Carola 8 — S Twins. 



Pol— Three Alrere tt a* S aaSS A Farrell— Cthal 
Ma* Hall A Co.— McCormlck A WlnehllL (Last 
Half) — Helen Jaekley— ManaSy McCarthy A f*- 
Eckert A Moor*. 



A LeFaror— Mardo A Htmter 

—Holmes A Lerere— Ash A Hyena — S American 
Glrla — Etui A Sunshine — McCormlck A WaTJaeS— 
McDermott A Heagney— KmUy Zarretl TtisMlllll* 
ITHACA, ». T. 
Rosw A Bice— Harmony Club— Fred Oldrldge— 
Lottie Grooper — Coaory Otflclala. 



JKRSET CITY, H. J. 
Ponghkeepale— Ktlsabeth Mayne— Fred A Albert 
—Gallarlnl Bister*— Mack A Earl— Melody Shop 
—M a rs h al l Montgomery— 2 Jesters— FllUa Family 
— Nevlns A Jordon — Fredericks A ralmar— 
Logon*. t 

LONDON, ONT. 
Cfaarie* Edlnbury— 3 Hy Unda— Hallsu * Fuller 
— Fox A lograham — Musical Mosses— Bolder Broa. 
— Mason A Owynne — Sidney Taylor Co.— MUa. 
si Jo — Young era. * ■ ' 

LAaTOASTKl, PA. jfcS " 
Elinor* Fisher— Davis Suck Caa.-Jbato. Mack- 
Ed. Jani* A GWf^Babcotk A Dortfd*— W.- Oak- 
land Co.— Lang A Shaw— S Arrerataa. 
MONTREAL. flasTlPa. 
Sam Tee Tronpe — Bloa — 3 Xoaeary*— Brown 
Slaters— Frank A TobJe. 

BXW HAVEN, CONN. 
Falaos— Octaro—Kesa A White — Larimer Hud- 
son Co.— Lewis A Norton— Malcolm A LaMar— 
Demarest A Colette— Herbert Ry«r A Partner. 

BUoo— Sari A Sunahlne— Raymond Wylls On, — 
K of C Octette — Billy Young Co. — Jessda llsilll 
Bay A Arthur— Loney Haskell— Princeton Glrla. 
NEWARK. N. J. 
Jack Marley— Rath Noye— Emma Frabail Co. — 
Barr Twins — Phil Baker— Marie Norstrom — Tracy 
A McBrlde— Allan Stanley— Presaler. Klala A Baza 
— T. A K. CMeara— Whiting A Burt. 
MEW LONDON, CONN. 
Pollard— Frank Johsn Co.— Mr. A Mrs. Hugh 
Bmmett— Mary Hsynes Co.— Woahl A Fuji— Ah 
Ling Foo— HoweU A Grore— Noodles Fagoo On, 
—Black A White. 

OTTAWA, OAN. 
Valacetla Beoparda — Jack Lerere— Hamilton 
Bames— Una Clayton Co. — Greenlee A Drayton. 
POST CHESTER, PA. 
Detosoo — Green A Lefell — Kelly A Klein— Clark 
A Lerere— Herbert 3. 

PABBAIO. >. 3. 
Bralyn O'Nell — Rnblnl A Martini— Hsssi Har- 
rington — Benn A Conn Ingham Twins— Paber Broa. 
— Jnllet Boab— Gllmor A Caatle— lorenll* Folll** 
— ^Engene Emmett — Turner A Grace. 

PITTSBURGH-JOHNSTOWN, PA 
Armstrong A Downey— Mary aafafaawaj Co.— 
Petty Beat A Bra. — BUly Bchoen — Wire A Walk- 
ter — Dorothy Richmond — M. A J. Dunedln— Del* 
Phone — Hickman Bros.— B. A B. Bob*. 
PHILADELPHIA , FA, 
Grand Opera House— Krsntx A LaaalleJeanett* 
of France — Kennedy A Kramer — Kelium A O'Deir 
—Bert Earl A Glrla— The Cat. 

Nixon— Orman A Nslle — Kelso A Ladghten— M. 
Jania Revue— Nort worth A Wells— Jack Bom. 

Keysteaa— Jack Martin Co. — Morgan A BUoter— 
Flnanelen— Phil Darla— Some Boll. 

WUllam Pass— Wlnkel A Dean— W. Oakland Ob. 
— Marie A A. Clark — Hayatakt Jape — Bob aHasaawal 
—Nancy Boyer Co.— Alhnan A Nslly— errery 
Sailor. 

P AWTUCKET, R. I. 
3 Keltons— Johnson. Baker A Johnson— gather S 
—Martin A Florence— Pletrip— Sesrl Allen A 
Lyman. 

p r rr a r i n n kass. 

Ah Ling Foo— Howell A Grore— Noodle* Fagan 
Co.— Bernard A Merit— Loin Coatee A Crecker- 
jacks— Pollard— Mardo A Hunter— Mr. A Mra. H. 
Bmmett — Frank Jnhaa Co. — Eldrldge A Gary. 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Frank Wilbur Co.— Van A Pierce— Wilcox lar- 
Croix Co.— Toarestl— Dorall A Lee— Earl A Cartas 
— E. J. Moore— McMabon A Adelaide. 
READING. PA. 

Ella Bard 3— Saxton A Farrell— Julia Curtis— 
Little Cottsge— Nsgflys— < Aarons— Henry A 
Moore — sterling Saxo 4. / 

STAMFORD. CONN. 

Zlaka A King— Hesaon A Jesswn— Art Smith- 
Juvenile Ponies— Elinore Fisher— Fiber Broa.— 
Aatr. Stanley — "L eague of Nations." 
BrarNBFIEXJ), CONN. 

Lorray A George— afalialy-McCartny Co.— Emily 
Zarrell — Poor of IT* — Boy A Arthur — Lanra A B. 
Dwyer— Henry J. Kelly— Bert Baker f»» af*J« 
A Irwin. 

SCRANTON, FA. 

Jolly Jno. Jones — Bodero — Brace Duffett Oo. 

Luckle A Harris— Ed- A Berdie Conrad— Marg. 
Francois Co.— Holmes A Wells— Glider A Philip* 
— Defero Opera House. 

B YRACUBE, M. T. 

Crescent— Fred Eldrldge— Sidney Taylor Cot- 
Jack Caae — Concert Berne — Bums A Garry— Joarra- 
-dah DeReJah— Delano A Pike — Waiman A Berry 
— Haxel Darenport— Joredsh DeReJah. 

Temple— Samsted A Marlon— exposition «— 
Crawford A Broderlck— Ethel May Hall Co- — 
Dobba A Welch — Ideal — Nolan A Nolan— Leon 
Varrarra— 4 Buttercups— Coakley A Donlery— 
Dale A Bnrcb— Ideal. 

1KJHENECTADY. N. T. 

Nolan A Nolan— Leon Varrarra — i Buttercup* 
—Dale A Bnrcb — Chaa. Abeam Troupe— Samsted 
A Marlon— Crawford A Broderlck— Ethel Mae Hall 
Co. — Wilson Bros. — Beth Bert A Co. 
TBOT. M. T". 

Modem Mirage — Lane A Harper — Whipple 
Houston Co.— Powers A Wallace— Corinthians— 

Sabine A Goodwin— J. Boa. Johnson Co. — Wilbur 

A Lyke— Brown A Jackson— Ames A Wlnthrop— 
Ryan A Healey— Santas A Hayea— gylrestar 
Sehasffer. 

TOaWHTO, CAN. 
Elaine A Titanla— Stewart A Neff— Zelaya — 
CAB. McDonald— Sherman. Van A Hyman. 
TRENTON. N. J. 
Al Jerome— Babcoek A DorUda— Brery Bailor-— 
Lang A Shaw— 3 Alreratss Eddie Badger— Mar- 
key A Montgomery — Charles Diegham— M. A A. 
dark — Pre Ills' a Docs. 

UTICA , N. T. 
Bolger Bros.— Fargo A Richards— Begs A Mask 
—Mason A Owynne— Wayne A Warren G li al 
Wilson Broa. — Wilson A Larson— Rose A Unas 
All Spark* Co.— Powers A Wallace— Nip A 
O'Brien. 

IContiuutd en Pag* 32) 



f$m sm 



(ThU it met a Pmt* Ptmitr) 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



SETTING A NEW PACE IN BURLESQUE 





PRINCIPAL COMEDIAN AND PRODUCER 
HARRY HASTINGS KEWPIE DOLLS STAR, BROOKLYN, THIS WEEK 

Acknowledged to Be the Biggest Laughing Show on Either Circuit 



B. f. Nairn's Union Square Theatre 

STOCK BURLESQUE— CAN ALWAYS USE 

GOOD CHORUS GIRLS 

Only Good Lookers and good workers should apply. 52 
weeks a year. New York engagement. No Sunday 
work. 1 

Salary, $20.00 Per Week 

Mat attractive engagement in show buaineM. Apply in paroon only. 



PRIMA DONNA 



LUCILLE ROGERS 



BON TONS 



ERNEST MACK VERA HENNICI 



Eccentric Singing- and Dancing 
Con 



Singing and Dancing Sonbratte 

GROWN UP BABIES 

SEE ROEHM * RICHARDS 



DOING STRAIGHT 



STROUSE and FRANKLYN'S ROUND THE TOWN 



>»» » »0»»»»»»»««»«*0»0»0»0»»»»00»»»«»0 M O M > 00*0 00»>»00»»OOO»< 



>»»»O»»OO00»»O0» i 



THIS SPACE 
RESERVED BY 



LEW LEDERER 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



MONICA REDMOND 



LIBERTY 
GIRLS 



JUNE LcVEA Y -° GEORGE D. WIEST 



Wilt 

SPORTING 
WIDOWS 



BARNEY 
GERARD 

PRESENTS 



EVELYN CUNNINGHAM 



FOLLIES OF THE DAY 

Direction 
ROEHM and RICHARDS 



TEXAS 

BEAUTY 



RUTH ROLLING 



'GLORIANA" 
C0. 



SOUBRETTE 



Y PALM E R 



GIRLS 
GIRLS 
GIRLS 



soubrette BABE DePALMER 



ROSE SYDELL 
COMPANY 



NOW 
APPEARING 

WHERE? 



AND 



'ROUND 

THE 

TOWN 



TRAMP 
ECCENTRIC 



O M A S 



IM 



GIRLS 
A LA 
CARTE 



PRIMA 
DONNA 



IN/IYR 



CHERRY 



GIRLS 
GIRLS 
GIRLS 



SOUBRETTE 



FLORENCE DEVERE 



SWEETIE 
SWEETIE 
GIRLS 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 



PETER S. CLARK'S 
NEW SHOW SHOULD 
GET THE BIG COIN 

We have to hand it to Peter B. Clark, for 
he hat in "On, Girl," to oar way of thinking, 
toe best show lie has had In many a year. 
When seen. last Tuesday afternoon "at the 
Empire. Brooklyn, it ran smoothly and with 
plenty of sBeed. 

There is one thing lacking though, and 
that is a good fast dancing soubrette to pot 
gome of the numbers over. He has a chorus 
girl who steps out and leads several numbers, 
and she does well. But sne hardly Alls the 
bill, at present. 

The cast, otherwise, Is afrovt the best Clark 
his shown us. Be has a fine looking chorus 
of dancing girls, who can all sing. Their 
costumes' are new and bright looking, and 
tbe scenery has been artistically designed. 

The comedy is in the hands of Danny 
Murphy, Ted Burns and Gene Morgan. Here 
are three men of different type, and they 
make a good combination, offering a variety 
of comedy that kept the audience in good 
humor all afternoon.' * 

Hurphy, who is doing his Dutch character, 
was never seen to better advantage, and 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from pure IS and en JS) 



never fitted better In a show before. He has 
an opportunity to show what he can do this 
season. He Is fast, works well, his dialect 
Is good and he gets his material over with 
a punch. They liked him at the Empire. 
. Burns looks better in this show than any 
we have seen him In for a long time. He la 
working faster, too, -this season. Morgan is 
doing black face and we have few In bar-' 
lesque his equal. His manner of expressing 
himself Is very natural. 

Clark has a new man in Carl De Angelo, 
who impressed ub as being an excellent per- 
former. He had very little to do in the first 
part of the show except bits, bnt he offered 
a specialty down near the middle of the first 
part that made them sit np and take notice. 
After that, he did an Italian character part 
which gave him a chance to stand out. His 
portrayal of the- part is good. 

Baymond Paine is a light comedian, who 
handles himself as though he were with a 
Broadway show. He has a neat wardrobe 
and makes a good appearance, works easy 
and seems perfectly at home in all he does. 

Drena Mack is the prima donna and was 



in as good voice as when we last caught her 
In burlesque two seasons ago. She reads 
lines well and has a very pretty wardrobe. 

Josephine Tounge, a shapely and most at- 
tractive young woman, is another lead and 
ahe stands' 'out in the show. She Is a 
brunette, with snappy black eyes and a pleas- 
ing personality. She has a good voice and 
knows how to use "it, as her numbers were 
lered. The gowns worn by Mtaa Tounge ware' 
prettily designed and the colors were in good 
kindly received and exceptionally well ran- 
taste for her style of beauty. She is a good 
woman for burlesque. 

FranUe Burns is in several scenes, but her 
work in the prohibition bit is the best she 
does. This bit of character work she does 
very well. 

Ester Lange leads several numbers and gets 
them over, and should develop with the 
proper handling. 

The "kiss" bit was well done by Burns and 
Miss Mack, as was the "Corporation" bit 
offered by Murphy, Paine and Burns. The 
"street-faker" bit, in one, with a special 
drop. Is a good piece of comedy business. It 
was excellently put over by Paine and the 



Faker, who were assisted by Morgan play- 
ing the banjo and mouth organ at the same 
time. It went over big. 

The "Old Friend Club" scene in the third 
act. a dramatic act, held the interest of the 
audience to the finish. It tells a good story 
and, at the same time, teaches a moral. In 
this seen* were Barns, Paine, De Angelo, 
Morgan, a property man, and the Misses 
Yonnge, Mack and Burns. 

Murphy stepped out of his character for a 
..few momenta in one, and did a »»ifci»g 
specialty that waa amusing. This was fol- 
lowed by the "pocket book" bit, with Murphy, 
Paine and Miss Tounge doing It. Miss 
Tounge played the part better than any 
we have seen in this bit. 

De Angelo offered an Italian specialty In 
one that went over very big. His Imperson- 
ation of the character was not overdone In 
make-up or dialect. He offered part of 
George Beban'a act "The Sign of the Boss,** 
which was very well done, and the applause 
at the finish proved that it pleased. 

The "prohibition" bit, as given by Ted and 
PranUe Bunas, was liked. It's a good comedy 
scene, and it couldn't help but please. 

The "Oh, Girl" is a good show from a 
scenic costume snd comedy standpoint. It 
has plenty of pretty girls and principals who 
can be depended upon. It should get tilt 
money this season. Sid. 



AN 


NA CAPLIN 

PRIMA DONNA 


HARRY HASTINGS KEWPIE DOLLS STAR, BROOKLYN, THIS WEEK 

I Am New to Burlesque. I Hope You Like Me. 



(///y/y/////y/yyy////y/y^ 



r sss/ssss//ss//////////sss////. 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 



>/////////////////////////, 



V//////'^////^////y/^^y//^yyyy//y/.'^y^v^y.V-'y^^yy-yy^yy^yy^yyy.'yy.'yyyyy^/'yy^, 



■.s.A//y.'\ f ///s///v///////////s//////////////////////////////////,,//////ys//s///////s/s/s^^ 



Season of 1919-20 

MAX SPIEGEL'S 

SOCIAL FOLLIES CO. 




ARGIE COATE 



Thanks to 
MR. IKE WEBER 



DOING STRAIGHT 



WITH JACOBS AND JERMON'S BURLESQUE REVIEW 



IVI BACHE INI 

Gaiety, Brooklyn Management— Ike Weber With Chaa. Robinson's Parisian Flirts 



INGENUE SOUBRETTE 



DIXON'S BIG REVIEW 



John MacKinnon 



JUVENILE-TENOR 



EDMOND HAYES' OWN SHOW 



RUTH BARBOUR 



SOUBRETTE 



RUBE BERNSTEIN'S FOLLIES OF PLEASURE 



BABE WE LLIN GTON 

IRRESISTIBLE BUNCH OF NERVES SOUBRETTE- NATIONAL WINTERGARPEN 

WM. F. (Billy) HARMS THEATRICAL ENTERPRISES 

HOBOKEN, N. J. (Member of T. B. CJ> ' 

FLORENCE WHITFORD 

SOUBRETTE JAZZ BABBIES ' 

ANNETTE LA ROCHELLE 

PRIMA DONNA RUBE BERNSTEIN'S FOLLIES OF PLEASURE 



JOHN O. GRANT 

PERSONAL DIRECTION-CHAMBERLAIN BROWN 

LOUISE PEARSON 



PRIMA DONNA 



MINSKVS NATIONAL WINTER GARDEN 



FRANK MALLAHAN 



DOING STRAIGHT 



WITH SAM HOWE'S SPORT GIRLS 



«JIlVf McCAULEY 



DOING RUBE AGAIN 



THIS SEASON WITH SAM HOWE'S SPORT GIRLS 



FRANK LULEY 



EDMOND HAYES' ORIGINAL BOZO 



WITH EDMOND HAYES' OWN COMPANY 



.FRANK ANDERSON 

Irish Comic with Chan. M. Baker's "Sweet Sweetie Girls." Costing Up One Rang a* • Tuns 

JULIA MORGAN 

The Sophie Tocher el Bnrlaa nn s. F. W. Cafnarays Mischief Makers, tmWsa. Tanks t> Jaw 

ANNETTE SHAW 



DANCING INGENUE 



LEW KELLY SHOW 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 




GOING OVER WITH PETE QJUUCS^H C1JU." CD. 



* i-'. 



LOOK US OVER 



I 



•;.. -it '-r. Vi--: ft. 



Character Singers with musical comedy voices. With Harry Hastings' "KEWPIE 
DOLLS,'' Stmr, Brooklyn, this week. 

JOSEPHINE YOUNG 

VAMPIRE GIRL, WITH "OH GIRLr 

IDA EMERSON and HARRY HILLS 



BACK IN BURLESQUE 



WITH EDMOND HAVES' OWN SHOW 



ETHEL DEVEAUX 



SOUBRETTE 



HASTINGS RAZZLE DAZZLE OT WIS 



GERTRUDE O'CONNOR 

AS MRS. BOZO WITH EDMOND HAVES' OWN CO. 



LEADING WOMAN 



WITH DIXON'S BIG REVIEW 



LORETTA AHEARN 

DAINTY SINGING AND DANCING SOUBRETTE-tMSM" DOLLS 

HAROLD KENNEDY 



COMEDIAN 



GIRLS A LA CARTE 



SHIRLEY MALLETTE 



WITH PACEMAKERS 



MANACEMENT-HERK, KELLY * 



PA "U. NE HARER 



ANDY 

Stasia* 



CAMPBELL and DREWS LIBERTY GIRLS 



JERRY LAWRENCE 

LIBERTY GIRLS 



HEBREW COMEDIAN 



ROUND THE TOWN in*.» 



GEO. CARROLL 



DOING TRAMP WITH THE JAZZ BABBIES 



babe: healy 

■saws flnu fci a li a , with. S i n ia ■— I— I B— with, Danaay Gn»4 

RUBY THORNE and ANNA GOLDIE 

SOUBRETTE CRACKER JACKS CHARACTERS 

JACK MUNDY 

DIRECTION-ARTHUR PEARSON . 

ROSE: E1V11VIETT 



RAGTIME INGENUE 



ROUND THE TOWN 



STRAIGHT 



SECOND SEASON 



WITH MAIDS OF AMERICA 






ISfE MAY 



I i 



SOUBRETTE 



SECOND SEASON 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



CIJJ9J9. 




In iwdai to avoid miitAlm and" to Jnjraro tfao prompt delivery of tha 
la 0n> list, a POSTAL CARD .must.be sent racjusatlng m lo !«rw«M : 
a* (iraod with your lull umr ud tti< •darw to which tsa latter la to 
Hao'af~baaiBoaa followed by th. 

war* aoVortlaaaL 



It 

aaaf tt. 



Bitty 
J Ho, 
. «0T 
Bertram]. TTaiik 
OmrcfcTJ, Harcld 
Cooper a Barrd 



Adair, Helm 
Austin. Mildred 
Bjouaa, Mil W. 
En 



Balk*. Mm- 0. 



Cattle, Harry B, 
Devtne. las. 
Daly. Joa. at 
Dlnkbe, Sonrde 
Ton, Al C 
Eaten. Jaa. G. 
Ecv&rd, Gene 



Black. Irt John 
Baroai, Blanch 
Qrvelaad, Haael 
Claiton. Dorothy 

Chase. Law* 

D* Ires. Dot 

Daye, EJaabrUi 



Bsrrla, Lev 

HeHIorTt Bun 
Huaalll, Pftu 



Klein, B. B- 
Leonao. Harry Me 




Kale, 



LADIES 



De Vert, Aliens 



Gray, Jddb 



Haf . vmmia 

.Hatdi, Oenertrre 



Joyce, Uxrfae 

mil. Balue 
Icon, Tjabel P. 

Lyons, &Tytbe 
La Boe. Edna 

lav, Beralee 



MVOamri, B. B. 
Mack. Grata* 
M tlaty ie . Jaa. 

Beld. V. 
Baeee. Edv. 

Bwrtth TbOS. 



Harris, L0j> 
Marry, Fecjy 
Normao, floreneft 
PaLuter, noma* 
pearl. Swell. 
Brady, Fatty 



w. a. 

.Join 
rV a an a. Boom 
wsitoer. H. 8. 

Ward. Ed. 
Toetory . J. C. f. 



Spaeth, YIoli 
Santa , LUy W. 
Soavaorf, Etxtn 
Vieomt, Alice 
Weston. EtM 
Wright, A1U 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(CoBtbraed trom pages) U and 9) 



6ELFRAGE HAS PUT 
OVER THE BEST SHOW 
OF HIS CAREER 

George Belfrage's show, "Hip, Hip 
Hooray,'? la at the Colombia this week. 
Belfrage has not alone given na a new 
show this season, bnt In addition has In- 
troduced two new comedians to burlesque, 
in Eddie Kane and Jay Herman. 

The book Is called "The Doll Hospital," 
and is by Charles Horwits. . It Is in two 
acts and nine scene*. The music, most of 
which has been specially written by Perrin 
Somen, is tanefnl and catchy 

The many seta of costumes worn by the 
chorus created amazement by their beaaty 
in design, harmonious blending of colors 
and 'snappy style. 

The scenery is bright In color effects and 
very elaborate. Each scene has been car- 
ried out in great detail, and nothing has 
been overlooked by the producer. 

Eddie Kane la doing an eccentric comedy 
part, while his partner. Jay Herman, does 
a light comedy. Both are. clever perform- 
ers. Kane does not use any make-up ex- 
cept a pair of rim glasses, and works In 
tight-fitting suits. His partner works 
"etralght" except in the last scene of the 
first act when be wears a misfit suit. 

It Is a question whether these soya will 
go over in burlesque as well as they would 
In other branches of theatricals. -Their 
comedy may be a little too quiet for a bur- 
lesque audience, which Is used to seeing 
comedians doing low comedy, with the 
make-up befitting the characters. 

There la no doubt, Judging by the way 
burlesque has been advancing In recent 
years, that it wm not be long before what 
Belfrage Is offering now . wm be common 
at the Columbia, bnt be la a little ahead of 
the time now. If Kane and Herman do 
some low comedy and roughen it up a bit 
in one act the burlesque, for instance, there 
Is no donbt but what their work wm be 
better appreciated. i 

Perrin G. Bommers is doing a "rube" 
throughout the performance, and sticks to 
the character all the way. He portrays it 
well 

Frank Berry does a black face and 
handles himself satisfactorily. 

Helen McClain, a bright, vivacious, charm- 
ing yotmg- lady, la a decided success as the 
prima donna. She rendered her nnmbeTB 
effectively. She reads lines carefully and 
offers gowns that are dainty and rich look- 
ing. Her work was most favorably received 
Monday afternoon. 

Thelma Seavelle, a dashing, shapely lit- 
tle sonbrette, both danced and sang her- 
self into favor. She injected lota of ginger 
Into her work, and Is one of those likable 
girls that easily pleases her audience. Her 
dresses are p re tt y . 

Tillle Storke is in a number of scenes in 
which she stands out. Her work in this 
respect is very good.. .She alaojbaa several 
numbers. .:Her wardrobe is more attractive 
than she offered last season, which la go- 
ing some, "rr '-..'i. 'irjp 

"Ton'reV.tsW One Pm LookibY For" was 
one of the big song hits of the 1 first act. It 
waa offered by Hiss McClain and Herman, 
assisted by several others. .» 

Herman ami Kane 'offered r* corking good 
specialty'* in oneV" using a "inerrable bar. 
Kane disk tho, .comedy and Hessnaa straight. 
The act baa good material, and the boys pat 



It over welL Its an act that has lots of 
comedy, but the kind that has to be put over 
right to get results. These boys get the 
results. " - 

White and Miss Seavelle offered a neat 
singing and dancing act in one that more 
than pleased. "Songs of Long Ago," offered 
by the principals, which waa a medley of 
the old-time popular songs, scored a suc- 
cess. 

Miss McClain offered a number In ose 
that was moat generously received. White 
and the Misses McClain and Storke, pre- 
sented a specialty of one number that wu 
of merit. 

A dandy musical act * was given by 
Somers and Barry, the latter working la 
black face. They offered popular and spec- 
ial selections on the banjo, cornets, clarion- 
ets, horns and trombones. The boys played 
the Instruments exceptionally well, and the 
act went over big. 

The Bernard Trio, three shapely young 
girls, offered a singing and dancing specialty 
In one that went over for encores. The 
girls are gracefull dancers and sing nicely. 
Its a good act. 

Harry White, in a neat looking silk tux- 
edo, was one of the hits of the perform- 
ance in his dancing specialty. He is second 
to none In his style of dancing, which he 
calls the eliding Jarz. He sorely showed as 
some steps and dancing that were worts 
while. 

The "Hip, Hip Hooray" show has one 
of the best productions we have. seen. Its 
a pretty show beautifully costumed, and i 
good musical offering. . . - SID. 



HAVING TROUBLE WITH PAPERS 

Louisville, Ky., Sept 12.— The Gayety 
Theatre in this city, baa got Into a row 
with the Courier-Journal and the Louis- 
ville Times, two of the strongest papers 
in the city. The papers claim that the 
theatre has not treated their representa- 
tives with proper respect and refuse to 
accept any advertising or publicity matter 
from the house. - 



"MISCHIEF MAKER" GIRL MARRIES 

Louisville, Ky., Sept. 13. — Dorothy 
MrKinley Adams, of F. W. Gerhardys 
Mischief Makers, was married here yes- 
terday to Fred T. Matney, carpenter of 
"She Walked in Her Sleep" Company. 



PETER S. CLARK SICK 

Peter S. Clark is confined to his home in 
Richmond Hill with an attack of hig* 
blood pressure. He was taken ill on Mon- 
day of last week when, his show, "Oh, 
Girl!" was playing the Empire, Brooklyn. 

CLOSING WITH HAYES SHOW 

Plaljtftsxd, N. J„ Sept '15.— DeDa 
Clark will dose with the Bdmond Hayes 
Show at the Grand Theatre, Trenton, Sat- 
urday. Katherine Adelphi will succeed 
her-as prima aionna. . 




(TAii ti mot a Pmct Petjilw) 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



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A QUICK descent of the final oar. 
A tain— then ALBOLENE— and the 

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this pare, agreeable make-np remover, 
the favorite of the stage for yean. 
For the make-up box 1 and 2 ounce 
tubes. Also in \z and 1 lb. cans. 

ALBOLENE is sold by any druggists or 
dealers in make-up. Free sample on 
request. 




HcKESSOH & ROBBINS 



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R.t. 1SSS ( 

91 Fulton Street, NewYork 



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THE 8E8X STUBICAI. KEVTTE IB TOWN. 

GEORGE WHITE'S 
SCANDALS? 1919 

With ABB FXBBTBGTOB, SB otSen. 

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A. H. WOODS PBESENTS 

A VOICE I1M 



WITH ORIGINAL CAST. 



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Next W*eB— <URLS FROM JOYLAN D 

BROOKLYN THEATRES 



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STAR 

KEWPIE DOLLS 

Not Week— AVIATOR GIRLS 

Ewery S emday 1 Bib Cotacss-ts 2 

CASINO THEATRE 

THIS WEEK 

BEST SHOW IN TOWN 

Next Week— HARRY HASTINGS SHOW 

EMPIRj^TO EATR E 

'■■', THIS WEEK 

M0LL1E WILLIAMS 

Near* W i A M P HIP HOORAY 



I Routes of Shows 



DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL. 

Route* Mutt Reach Tbi» Ofiw Not Later 

Than Saturday 

."Adam. and Eva"— Lonpacre. New York, In- 

._def. .. ."r."" .,.; ... '.v.™ ""..". 

'"At 9 :4S" — Playhouse, New York, indef. 

"Better "Ole"— Mr. and' Mn. Coburn— Booth. 
New York City. " '"* ' V 

"Buddies" — Park Sq . . Boston,. Mass.-— Indef . 

"Cappj Hicks" — Cort, Chicago, m.^c 

"Cha Chin Chow"— Century. New Tork. 

"Crimson AHbl" — Broadhurst. New Tork. 

Carmelo's Ted. Musical Comedy Co. — Bex, 
Omaha, Neb., lndef. 

"Colo Chin"— San Diego. Calif . 21-22: Pasa- 
dena. 23 ; Riverside. 24 : Bedlands 25 ; San 
Bernardino, 26; Phoenix. Arts., 28-28. 

"Civilian Clothes" — Morosco, N. T.. lndef. 

"Challenge, The" — Selwyn, N. Y., lndef. 

"Canary, The" — Colonial, Chicago, lndef. 

"Five Million, The" — Maxlne Elliott. New 
York City. 

"Friendly Enemies" — Manhattan O, H., New 
York, lndef. 

Grace George — Vanderbllt. New York City, 
lndef. 

Greenwich Village Follies — Nora Bayes, New 
York, lndef. 

"Gaieties of 1919" — 44th SL. New York City. 

Gallo Opera Co. — Shubert-Belaaco. Washing- 
ton, D. C. 15-20. 

Hltcbey Koo of 1919 — Colonial. Boston, lndef. 

"Happy Days" — N. Y. Hippodrome. N. Y. 

Herrman, Felix (Magician) — Kingston, N. Y., 
18; Ponghkeepsie, 19 :Newburg. 20: Perth 
Amboy, N. J.. 22 : Eaaton, Pa., 23 ; Potts- 
dam, 24. 

"John Fergnson" — 'Fulton, New York City, 
lndef. 

"Listen Lester" — Illinois. Chicago, lndef. 

"ls\ La Lucille" — Criterion, N. Y.. lndef. 

"Laamore" — Henry Miller's, New York City, 
lndef. 

"Llghtnln' "— Gayety, New York City, lndef. 

"Lonel Borneo" — Casino, N. Y. 

"Monte Cristo, Jr." — Winter Garden, New 
York City. 

"Nighty Night"— Princess, New York City. 

"Oh, What a Girl" — Shubert, New York, 
lndef. 

"Oh. My Dear"— Wilbur. Boston, lndef. 

"Prince There Waa, A" — Standard, New York 
City. 15-20. 

"Passing Show" — Garriek, Chicago, 15-20. 

"Regular Feller" — Cort New York City, lndef. 

"Royal Vagabond, The" — Cohan A Harris. 
New York City. 

"Scandals of 1919" — Liberty, New York City. 

"Seev8aw" — Tremont. Boston. Mass. 

"Sunnysonth Co." — Danville, Que.. Canals, 
IS; St. Hyacinthe. 19: Granby, 20; Water- 
loo, 22; Magog, 23; Knowlton, 24. 

"Scandal"— 39th Street, New York City, 
lndef. 

"Shubert Gaieties" — 44th Street. New York 
City, indef. 

"Sometime" — Shubert, Boston, lndef. 

ThuTBton — Globe. New York City. 15-20. 

"Three Wise Fools"— Power's, Chicago. 

'Those Who Walk in Darkness" — 48th Street. 
New York City. 

"Take It From Me" — Studebaker, Chicago. 

"Up In Mabel's Room" — Woods. Chicago, IB. 

"Dp From Nowhere" — Comedy, New York 
City, lndef. 

"Thirty-Nine East" — Shubert Riviera. New 
York City, 13-20. 

"What's the Odds" — National, Wash., D. C, 
15-20. 

"Voice in the Dark. A" — Republic. New York. 

"Zlegfeld Follies". — New Amsterdam. 

MINSTRELS 

U G. Fields — Greensboro, N. C- 18: Lynch- 
burg, Va., 19; Richmond. 21-24; Norfolk, 

23-27. 

CIRCUS 

Al. G. Barnes' — St. Louis, Mo.. 18-21. 

STOCK 

Albee Stock. Providence, B. I., lndef. 
Arlington Theatre Co. — Boston. Mass., lndef. 
Alcazar Players — Alcaxar, San Francisco, Ca). 
Baker Players — Portland. Ore-., lndef. 
Blaney Stock— Yorkrllle. New York City. 
Belgrade. Sadie — New Bedford. Mass.. lndef. 
Beasey, Jack, Stock — Peoria, in., lndef. 
Brissac, Virginia Stock — 8trand San Diego. 

CaL, Indef. 
Brown. George. Stock — Whalen Park. Fltch- 

burg, Mass.. indef. 
Booth, Nellie, Players — Pittsburgh, Pa. lndef. 
Brownell-Stoek — Dayton. O.. lndef. 
Byers, Fred, Stock — Waverly, N. Y.. lndef. 
Chicago, Stock — AltOODa. Pa., indef. 



FREE Y mtmm l 

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contains a liberal sssortment of James 
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Send orders to JAMES MADISON, 1S*J 
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F»L AYS 

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AT GREATEST SACRIFICE EVER OFFERED. 

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PLATS, S KE I CH E S 



E. U GAMBLE. rOAYWRlCHT 



Crawford, Kd. Stock — Bath Me., lndef. 
Colonial fetock- Pittefleld. Mass.. lndef. 
Colonial Stock — Cleveland. O., lndef. 
Dominion Players — Winnipeg; Manitoba. Can.. 

Indef. 
Dnrkln Stock — Skowhegan, Me., lndef. 
Desmoad, Mae, Player*- — 8cxanton. Pa., lndef. 
Del Lawrence, Co. — Majestic San Francisco, 

Ca!., lndef. ... 
Enterprise Stock Co. — Green Bay. Wis., lndef. 
Forest Park Musical Stock — St. Louis, Mo.- 
Grand Theatre Stock Co. — Tola*. Ok la., lndef. 

Gardner Bros. Stock Co. — Palace, Oklahoma 

City. Okia.. lndef. 
Glaser, Vaaghan, Musical Stock — Cleveland. 

O.. Indef. 
Hunt'a Musical Stock — Boston. Mass., lndef. 
Howard-Lorn Stock — National, Englewood, 

111., lndef. 
Hawkins-Webb Co. — Regent, Muskegon. Mich.. 

lndef. 
Hawkins- Webb Co. (2) — Powers, Grand Bap- 
Ids. Mich., indef. 
Keith Stock — Colnmbna. O.. lndef. 
Keith Players— Union HIU. N. I. 
Knickerbocker Players— Syracuse. N. Y., lndef. 
Llscomb Player*— Majestic, San Francisco. 

CbL, lndef. 
Liberty Players — Strand. San Diego. Ca!., 

lndef. 
Liberty Players — Norumbega Park, Mass., 

lndef. 
Lyceum Theatre Stock — Duluth. Minn., lndef. 
Lyric Stock — Lincoln. Neb.. Indef. 
Lyric Theatre Players — Hamilton. Can. 
MacLean, Pauline, Stock — Caleron Park. N. Y. 
Majestic Theatre Stock — Los Angeles, CaL; 

indef. 
Manhattan Players— Rochester, N. Y.. Indef. 
Marshall Stock — Washington, D. C, lndef. 
Morosco Stock — -Los Angeles, Cal.. Indef. 
Mlaturn Stock — Milwaukee. Wis., lndef. 
Ctphenm Players — Montreal, Can., lndef. 
Otis Olive Players — La Fayette, lnd., tndef. 
Permanent Players, Orpheum — Moose Jaw, 

Saak., Can., lndef. 
Piney Theatre Stock Co. — Boise. Idaho, indef. 
Park Theatre Stock— Utlca. N. Y, Indef. 
Poll Players — Springfield. Mass.. lndef. 
Poll Players — Waterbury. Mass., lndef. 
Poll Players — Wilkes-Barre. Pa., lndef. 
Poll Players — Worcester. Mass., lndef. 
Robins Players— Toronto, Can.. Indef. 
Royal Stock Co. — Vancouver. B. C. lndef. 
Sbipman Co.. Bert. — Hot Springs. Ark., Indef. 
Savoy Players — Hamilton, Can., lndef. 
Spooner, Cecil — Miner's. Bronx, New York 

City, lndef. 
Stevenson Musical Stock — Hartford. Conn.. 

lndef. 
Taylor Musical Stock — Penscook, N, H., In- 
def. _^ 

COLUMBIA WHEEL 

Al Reeves' Show — Colombia. Chicago. 15-20: 

Gayety, Detroit. 22-27. 
Abe Reynolds' Revue — Lyric, Dalton, 16-20; 

Olympic, Cincinnati, 22-27. 
Best Show In Town — Casino, Brooklyn. 15- 

20: Empire, Newark, 22-27. 
Ben Welch's Show — Gayety, Buffalo, 15-20; 

Gayety, Rochester. 22-27. 
Behman Show — Newburg, N. Y„ 15-17; 

Ponghkeepsie, 18-20 ; Gayety. Boston, 22-27. 
Beauty Trust — Gayety, St. Louis, 15 20; 

Star and Garter, Chicago. 22-27. 
BUI Watson's Parisian Whirl — Empire, Al- 
bany, 16-20; Casino. Boston. 22-27. 
Bon tons — Gayety, Kansas City, 16-20; open 

22-27; Gayety. 
Bowery Bnrlesquera — Gayety, Pittsburgh, 15- 

20; Park. Youngstown, 22-24; Grand, Ak- 
ron, 25-27. 
Boatoniana — Gayety, Boston. 15-20 : Colum- 
bia, New York. 22-27. 
Burlesque Review — Orpheum, Faterson, 13- 

20 ; Majestic Jersey City. 22-27. 
Bnrlesque Wonder Show — Park, Youngstown, 

O., 15-17 ; Grand, Akron, 18-20 : Star, 

Cleveland, 22-27. 
Dave Marlon Show — Jacques, Waterbury, 

Conn., 15-JO; Hurting & Seamon'a; New 

York, 22-27. , 
Follies of the Day— Majestic, Jersey City, 

15-20: Perth Amboy. N. J., 22; PUinfleld, 

23 ; Stamford, Conn., 24 ; Park, Bridge- 
port, 25-27. 
Girls A-La-Carte — Casino, Boston, 15-20; 

Grand, Hartford, Conn.. 22-27. 
Girls of the U. S. A. — Olympic, Cincinnati. 

15-20: Star and Garter, Chicago, 22-27. 
Girls de Looks — Empire, Toledo, 15-20; 

Lyric. Dayton, O., 22-27. 
Golden Crooks — Gayety, Montreal, 15-20: 

Empire, Albany, 22-27. 
Harry Hastings' Show — Miner's Bronx, New 

York. 15-20: Casino. Brooklyn. 22-27. 
Hello America ! — Gayety, Toronto, Ont., 16- 

20; Gayety, Buffalo, 22-27. 
Hip-Hip, Hooray — Columbia, New York, 13- 

20; Empire, Brooklyn. 22-27. 
Lew Kelly s Show — Hnrtlg A Seamon'a, New 

York, 15-20; Orpheum, Peterson, 22-27. 
Liberty Girls — Grand. Hartford, Conn., 15 

20; Jacques, Waterbury, Conn.. 22-27. 
Maids of America — Peoples'. Philadelphia, 15- 

20; Palace, Baltimore, 22-27. 
Million Dollar Dolls — Gayety, Omaha, Neb.. 

15-20 : Gayety. Kansas City. 22-27. 
Mollis Williams Co. — Empire. Brooklyn, 15- 

20; Peoples'. Philadelphia, 22-27. 
Oh. Girl — Empire. Newark, 16-20; Casino, 

Philadelphia. 22-27. 
Peek-a-Boo— Gayety, Detroit, 16-20; Gayety, 

Toronto, Ont., 22-27. 
Boseland Girls — Gayety, Chicago. 15-20; Des 

Moines, la., 22-26. 
Rose Sydell's London Belles— Bsotable, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., 15-17: Lomberg. Utlca. 18-20; 

Gayety. Montreal, Can,, 22-27. 

■ (Continuid an Pagt 32) 

(Tass if sbsj ■ Pecs FssssVr) 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



WHO WANTS A FAST TRAMP? 

Drinking? No! Liquor Too High— Beer Too Weak. 





King James Hotel 



Philadelphia,, Pa. 




TUBERCULOSIS 



It was when physicians 
said it was impossible for 
J. M. Miller, Ohio Drug- 
gist to survive the ravages 
of Tuberculosis, he began 
.experimenting on himself, 
land discovered the Home 
(Treatment, known as 
ui« vim ADDILINE. Anyone with 
concha showing tubercular tendency or Tuberculosis, may Dae It under plain directions. 
Bend jour name and addreai to 

ADDILINE 38 Arcad* Building - CoUimbua^Ohio 



WANT AT ONCE 

Clever. Sober. Leading Juvenile Man 

Appearance, Wardrobe, Ability, Absolutely Essential. The more desirable 
you are the more salary. Plays: "House of Glass"; "Nothing But the 
Truth;" "Lilac Time;" "Sis Hopkins;" "Never Can Tell." Clean, depend- 
able peo p le in all lines wire quick. Year around work. Week Sept. 15-20, 
Hazleton, Pa.; week Sept 22-27, Shamokin, Pa. WM. H. HARDER, 
Myrkle-Harder Co. Permanent address, Allenhurst, N. J. 



WANTED-DRAMATIC PEOPLE 

in all lines lor permanent stock, two bills a week. SDIIOND BARRETT, Direc- 
tor, 214-16 Citizens" Bank Building, Decatur, 111. 



WANTS IMMEDIATELY 

Comedian. -Other useful people, write. Join on wire. Address J. E. 
BALFOUR, Charkrttetown, Fa, Week September 22. 

NOW BOOKING SEASON 1919-1920 

BARNESBORO OPERA HOUSE 

Ca.pM.ttJT 999. 36 miles from Altoooa. 46 miles from Johnstown. 23 miles from Cresson, P. R_ R. 
Ample Stage Tor open time and term* address FRED MORLEY, Mimnr. Bwaeftboro. Pa. 

Drs-winsr Population 20,000. 



GEORGE DRURY HART 

In "I Beg Your Pardon" 

In — —hat— with JIMMIE BUSS, FRED A. TYMERS. HATTIE FOLEY 



The Whirling Wheels of Death 

in the Triple Revolving Cycling Sensation 
■THE LATEST INVENTION Br CHAS. ARTHUR ROEHR 



ROSE 



WESLEY 



KLINE and FRAZER 

Song and Talkology 



CLARENCE 



BEATRICE 



L U T Z & IM E W rVl A Ptf 

l, Talking and Dancing 



ROUTES OF SHOWS 

(Continued from pagw 31) 



Social Maids — Empire, Toledo, 15-20; Lyric, 

Dayton, O., 22-27. 
Sporting Widows — Gayety, Washington, 15- 

20; Gayety, Pittsburgh, 22-27. 
Star and Garter Shows — open, 15-20; St. 

Louis. 22-27. 
Step Lively Girls — Casino, Philadelphia, 18- 

20 ; Miner's 140th St.. New York, 22-27. 
Twentieth Century Maids'— Gayety, Rochester. 

15-20 ; Bastable, Syracnse, 22-24 ; Lumberg, 

TJtica, 25-27. 
Victory Belles — Berchel, Des Moines, Iowa, 

15-18; Gayety, Omaha, Neb., 22-27. 

AMERICAN WHEEL 

All Jazz Review — Gayety, Milwaukee, 15-20 
Gayety, St. Paul, 22-27. 

Aviator Girls — Empire, Hoboken. 15-20; Star 
Brooklyn, 22-27. 

Broadway Belles— Penh Circuit, 15-20; Gay- 
ety, Baltimore, 22-27. 

Beauty Review— Gayety, Minneapolis, 15-20 
Gayety. Sioux City, Iowa, 22-27. 

Blue BlraB^-Hayrnarket. Chicago. 15-20; Gay- 
ety, Milwaukee, 22-27. 

Cabaret Girls — Victoria, Pittsburgh, 15-20 
Penn Circuit, 22-27. 

Cracker Jacks — Olympra, New York, 15-20 
Gayety. Brooklyn, 22-27. 

Dixon's Big Review— Majestic. Wukea-Barre, 
16-20; Majestic, Scranton, Pa., 22-27. 

Edmund Hayes Show — Army, Wrigbtstown, 
N. J., 1S-20; Bijou. Philadelphia. 22-27. 

Follies of Pleasure— -Grand, Worcester, 15- 
20 : Howard, Boston, 22-27. 

French Frolics — Gayety, Baltimore, 15-20 
Lyceum, Washington, 22-27. 

Girls from the Follies — New Academy. Buf- 
falo, 15-20 : Empire. Cleveland. 22-27. 

Girls from Joyland— Howard, Boston, 15-20 
Olympic, New York, 22-27. 

Girls, Girls. Girls — Broadway, Camden, N. J. 
15-20: Majestic, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 22-27. 

Grown Up Babies — Park, Indianapolis. 15-20 
Gayety, Loolsville, 22-27. 

Jazz Babies — Majestic. Scranton, 15-20 . 
Blnghamton, N. Y., 22-24; Niagara Falls, 
25-27. 

Kewple Dolls — Star, Brooklyn, 15-20; Plaza, 



Springfield, Mass., 22-27. 
Lid Lifters — Star, St. Paul, 15-20; Gayetv 

Minneapolis, 22-27. ' 

Midnight Maids — Cadillac, Detroit, 15-20- 

Englewood, Chicago, 22-27. 
Mischief Makers — Lyceum, Columbus, O., 15, 

20; Victoria, Pittsburgh, 22-27. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Gayety, Louisville, is. 

20 ; Lyceum, Columbus, 22-27: 
Oh Frenchy«-Open Sept. 15-20 ; Standard, St. 

Louis, 22-27. ' - 

Pacemakers — Bijou, Philadelphia, 15-20 ; Em- 
pire, Hoboken, 22-27. 
Parisian Flirts — Gayety, Brooklyn, 15-20; 

Gayety, Newark, 22-27. 
Pat White Show — Standard, St. Louis, 15-20; 

Teere Haute, Ind., 21 ; Park. Indlannpolii, 

22-27. 
Razile Dazzle Girls — Binghamton, N. Y., 15- 

17; Niagara Falls, 18-20; Star, Toronto, 

Ont., 22-27. 
Record Breakers- — Lyceum, Washington, 15- 

20; Trocadero, Philadelphia, 22-27. 
Round the Town — Star, Toronto, Ont., 15- 

20 ; New Academy, Buffalo, 22-27. 
Sliding BUly Watson — Englewood, Chicago, 

15-20 ; Haymarket, Chicago, 22-27. 
Social Follies — Trocadero, Philadelphia, 15- 

20; Broadway, Camden, N. J., 22-27. 
Some Show— Empire, Cleveland, 15-20 ; Cadil- 
lac. Detroit, 22-27. 
Sport Girls — Gayety, Newark, 15-20; Army, 

Wrigbtstown, N. J.. 22-27. ' 
Stone & PiUard's — Century. Kansas City, 

15-20; open 22-27; Standard, St. Louis, 29- 

Oct 4. 
Sweet Sweetie Girls — Plaza, Springfield, 

Mass., 15-20; Grand, Worcester, Mass., 22- 

27. 
Tempters — Gayety, Sioux City, Iowa, 13-20; 

Century, Kansas City, 22-27. 

PENN CIRCUIT 

Wheeling, W. Va. — Monday. . - 

Union to wd. Pa. — Tuesday. 

Johnstown. Pa. — "Wednesday. 

Altoona, Pa. — Thursday. 

WUuamsport, Pa. — 'Friday. 

York, Pa. — Saturday. 




WATKKBUEY, conn, 
CartelU — DeLyte Girls — MeDermott A Heagney 

— RoaetUne— 3 Beauties — Manlo * Hunter — 
Holmes & Levere — Lorray ft George — Larimer 
Hudson Co. 

WILKES HAS RE, PA. 

Marg. Francois — Holmes ft WeUs— Gilder * 
Philips — DeFero Op. House — Holly Jno. Jones — 
Bodero — Bruce Doffett Co. — Lnekle ft Harris — Ed. 
ft Berd. Conrad. 

W0OHBOCKET, B. L 

Pletro — Martin ft Florence— Sir Alien ft Lyman 
— Hooper ft B nrkh a rt — 3 Ke ltons — B. Kelly Forest. 
WORCESTER, MAS8, 

Paljtce. — Laura ft B. Dwyer — Malcolm ft LeMar 
— Bert Baker Co. — Mayo ft Edwin— Cecil Eldridge 
ft Car — Robinson ft Lefever — Four of TJs — 5 Ameri- 
can Girls. 

Plaza— Henry J. Kelly — McCarthy ft Faye — 
Patrick ft Otto — Princeton Girls — DeLyte Girls — 
Mullaly McCarthy Co. — Barber ft Lynn. 
YORK PA. 

B. ft B. Mathews — Pvt. Bob Randell— Gray A 
Byron — Al Sbayne — 1 Raroos — 2 Earls — Saxon ft 
FarreU— Julia Curtis— Little Cottage. 

LOEWS CIRCUIT 

HEW YORK 09BR 

American — (First Half) — Fred Koraean — Brower, 
La Honla ft Brower— Levy A Symphony Girls — 
Burns ft Gary — Ezra Matthews ft Co. — Stan Stan- 
ley—Three Gregorles. (Last Half) — Betty Eldred 
ft Co.— Marie Rossel ft Co.— Stan Stanley — Mar- 
garet Calvert — Wolf ft Stewart— Bade ft Edge, 

Orphoum (First Half) — Bell ft Grey — Young ft 
Le^nder — Al Nona — LeBoy Lytton ft Co. — Laurie 
Ordway ft Co.— Jean Lelghton's Revue. (Last 
Half) — Fred Koroean — Murphy ft Klein— Gordon 
& Gordon — "Here and There" — Ltbby ft Nelson. 

National (First Half)— Lockhart ft Leddy— BI- 
roy Sisters— Sophie ft Harvey Everett — Baker ft 
Rogers — Brown, Gardner ft Barrett. (Last Half) 

— Lorimer ft Carberry — McXoughUn ft Brans — 

CoOman ft Carroll— L. Wolfe Gilbert A Co.— 
Royal Four. 

Metropolitan (First Half)— Harry Lamed— 
Lieut. Chas. Gerard — Woo If ft Stewart — Bade ft 
Edge — Boudlnl ft Bernard. (Last Half) — Bums 
ft Garry — LaHeon ft Dnpreece — Baker ft Roarers — 
Jsck Levy ft Girls. 

Greeley (First Half)— Joggling DeLlsIe— Mur- 
phy ft Klein — "Here and There." (Last Half) — 
Angel Slaters — Lieut. Cfaaa. Gerard — LeRoy Lyt- 
ton ft Co.— Downing A Binns — Three Gregorys. 

Selancay (First Half) — Irma ft Conner— Dorotiy 
Roys — Johnson Bros. A Johson — Lsunbextl — Jones 
ft SylTester— Lorimer ft Carberry. (Last Half) — 
Musical Chrlstl tea— Gordon A Del mar — Al Nod* — 
"The Owl"— Barron ft Burt— Weulng ft LeFaTor. 

Do Xalb (First Half)— Louise ft Carmen— Gor- 
don ft Etmar — MeOarty ft stennard — Zulin ft Drela. 
(Last Half)— Oliver— Millard ft Doyle— Frances 
Bice — Barnes ft Freeman — Seattle ft Blome. 

Boulevard (First Half)— Angel Slaters— Mc- 
Looghlin ft Evans — Frances Rice Barron ft Burt 



— Llbby ft Delson. (Last Half) — Irma ft Conner— 
Dorothy Boye — Ezra Matthews ft Co.— Jones * 
Sylvester. 

Vlotorla (Flrat Half)— Oliver— Millard ft Bojla 
—Marie Russell ft Co. — Barnes ft Freeman. (Last 
Hair)— King Bros.— L'Estran A Sisters— Jem 
Lelghton's Berne — Win ft Mary Rogers, 

Lincoln (Flrat Half) — Walling ft LeFavar— 
Margaret Calvert — Royal Four— Will ft Ran* 
Rogers — Harry Antrim. (Last Half) — Cowtoy 
Williams ft Daisy — Young ft Leander— Lebertf— 
Lauire Ordway ft Co. — Harry Lamed. 

Fulton (First Half)— Cowboy Williams 4 Diuj 
— L'Esstrange Sisters — Downing ft Bunta— "its 
Owl." (Last Half)— BeU ft Gray— Olive U- 
Compte ft Co. — McCarthy ft Bteuard— Znhn * 
Drels — Doudinl ft Bernard. 

Warwick— miles — Morgan ft Gray— Argons 
Five. (Last Half)— The Lelands— Sophie & Har- 
vey Everett. 

8ALTTM0RE. MB 
Mori Brothers— Haekett ft Francess— Mr. ft Mm. 
Hill ft Co — King ft Harvey — Scanlon, Dennos a 
Scanlon. 

BOSTON, SUSS. 
First Half)— Csphme ft Wells— Helen MoretH- 
Dare Austin ft Co. (Last Half) — Brans ft Bart— 
Mildred Rogers— Ssndlfer A Bromd&le— Plerrt 
Sextette — Anthony ft Boss— Stafford ft DeRoas. 
FALL, RIVER, MASS. 
(First Half)— Blona ft Burt— Mildred Bogera- 
Pierrea Sextette— Anthony A Ross— Stafford a 
DeRoss. (Last Half)— CaphuM ft Wells— Hela 
Morettl — Dare Austin ft Co. — Bert Hamloa. 
HAMILTON, ONT., CANADA 
P. George — Neda Norralne — "Just for tostanca" 
— Kenny ft Hollls— LaPetlte Jennie ft Co. 
HOBOKEN, N. J. 
(First Half)— Fenwlck Sisters— Dream Girl Co. 
(Last Half) — Brown's Dogs — Harry Antnnv— 
Fashions Devon e g. 

MONTREAL, CANADA 

Chadwlek ft Co. — Eddie Phillips Anderson * 

Bean— Hoey ft Fis ch er— Lin g A Long. 
REV ROOHELLE, V. Y. 
(First Half)— Wlkl Bird— King A Harvey- 
Etoel Clifton ft Co. (Last Half)— Connolly k 
Francis — Cavanaugh ft Francis — Johnson Bros. * 
Johnson. 

PATERS ON, H. J. . 
(First Half)— Langton ft Smith — June Mills * 
Co. (Last Half)— Goldie ft Ward— Fenwlck Sla- 
ters. 

, i PITTRMKLD, MASS. 

(First Half) — Beattle ft Bloine — WiCle Smith- 
Colfman ft Carroll — LaHoen ft Dnpreece — L. Wolfe- 
Gilbert A Co.— King ft Brown. (East Half)— 
-Mages ft Anita — Crane Sisters— Van ft Vermoo— 
Morgan ft Gray — Merli n— Russell ft DeWltt. 
PROVIDENCE, B. I. 
(First Half)— The Fenallea— Weston ft Marios 
— Saudlfer ft Brogsdale — Carlisle ft Romer— Fred 
Allen — Coostan tine Dancers. ' ( (Last Half )— 
Krayonna ft Co. — Henry Frey— John T. Doyle * 
Co.— Wella ft Crest— Leddy ft Leddy. 



ACTS W.ANTCD 

AVENUE THEATRE, DETROIT, MICH. 

Good Acts, wishing- to play Detroit, send in your open tirne. 
Address ARTHUR A. CLAMAGE, Avenue Theatre Detroit, Mich. 



September 17, 1919 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 




PUTNAM BLDG. 

TO BECOME 

THEATRE 

FAMOUS PLAYERS BUY SITE 



The purchase of the Putnam Building, 
at Forty-third street and Broadway, by 
the Famous Players -Laaky Corporation, 
was announced last week. 

The property was bought, from a syndi- 
cate headed by Robert EL Simon that pur- 
. chased it last June from Vincent Astor. 

Adolph Zukor, president of Famous 
Players, announced that Westover Court, 
which adjoins the building in the rear, 
has also been purchased. 

The Putnam Building which, at present, 
contains Stanley's restaurant and houses 
a great many vaudeville booking agents, 
in addition to the Marcus Loew offices, 
will be used as the main office of the cor- 
poration; and, on the site of Westover 
Court, a motion picture thetre, larger 
than any similar theatre in the Broadway 
district, will be erected. 

The price at which, the building was 
purchased was not given out, but, at the 
time Simon took over the building, the 
property had been offered at $5,000,000. 
He admitted making a larger profit on 
the re-sale of the building than in any 
deal he had made for a number of years. 
The property, including Westover Court, 
is assessed for $3,400,000. 

Stanley's lease has five more yean to 
run and, on its expiration, the Famous 
Players will erect a tall office building on 
the site. The large Wrigley gum sign 
atop of the building will be replaced by a 
larger one exploiting the Lasky films. 

At present, the Famous Players have 
offices at 428 Fifth avenue, 729 Seventh 
avenue and at 469 Fifth avenue, but at 
the termination of the leases, the company 
will use the entire front of the Putnam 
Building for its offices. 

The Putnam Building has a frontage of 
200.10 feet, and 100 feet on the Bide 
streets. Westover Court fronts 107 feet 
on each side street and comprises ten old 
four-story dwellings. 

CAPITOL BOOKS FOUR METROS 

Negotiations were closed last week be- 
tween Edward J. Bowes, vice-president 
and managing director of the Capitol The- 
atre, and Richard A. Rowland and Wil- 
liam E. Atkinson, both of the Metro Film 
Corporation, whereby the Capitol Theatre 
will feature four of the new Metro pro- 
ductions. These four are "The Brat," fea- 
turing Nazimova, and three of the Screen 
Classics, Inc., features with Bert Lytell, 
May Allison and Viola Diana. They are 
"Lombardi, Ltd.," "Fair and Warmer* and 
"Please Get Married." 



COMPANY NAMED AFTER STARS 

The new film corporation recently or- 
ganized • by Maxine Elliot and William 
Paversham to make special productions 
will be known as the Elliot-Faversham 
Company, and is backed by $300,000 capi- 
tal George D. Baker, who directed Nazim- 
ova in "Revelation," will direct the first 
two films of this company. They will 
be scenarioized from H. De Vere Stack- 
poole's "The Man Who Lost Himself' and 
George Agnew Chamberlain's "White 
Man." . • 



PATHE COMING OVER AGAIN 

Charles Bathe is due in two weeks for 
another visit to this country. He returned 
to his home in France, after spending the 
spring and part of the summer' here. He " 
W H1 stay here for the months of October 
and November. 



SELECT GOES TO LONDON 

The Select Pictures Corporation will 
establish an English ■ branch in London 
next month, to be known as Select Pic- 
tures, Ltd. This branch will be conducted 
by Maxwell Milder, president, and Miss 
Edith Kotch, treasurer. Milder has been 
manager of the Select's Philadelphia 
branch for several years, and Miss Kotch 
was secretary to Lewis J. Selznick, presi- 
dent of Select. The two sail for England 
today (Wednesday). 

Temporary headquarters will be estab- 
lished by them at the Hotel Savoy in Lon- 
don, until permanent offices can be ob- 
tained. 



PETE SMITH JOINS NEILAN 
Peter Gridley Smith, after dispensing 
publicity for the Famous Flayers-Leaky 
Corporation for the last, five years, left 
that firm on Monday. He is now affiliated 
with Marshall Neilan in the Capitol The- 
atre Building, where he has entire charge 
of the publicity and advertising work. 
Smith will leave for the Pacific Coast in 
a few weeks to consult with Neilan on a 
publicity campaign. 

PARAMOUNT GETS TRUEX 

The Ernest Truex pictures, which are 
being made by the V. B. K. organization, 
have been added to the comedy attractions 
of the Famous PlayerB-Lasky Corporation. 
The same arrangement by which the Mrs. 
Sidney Drew comedies, also V. B. K. pic- 
tures are distributed, has been made in 
regard to the Truex films, and they will 
henceforth be distributed by Paramount. 

WILL SCREEN "FORTUNE HUNTER" 

The Vitagraph will produce "The For- 
tune Hunter" on the screen in the near 
future. The original play was written by 
Winchell Smith. 

John Barrymore played the leading role 
in the Broadway production, which won 
success. Earle Williams has been selected 
to play his part in the screen version ol 
the play. 



HAMPTON BUILDING NEW STUDIO 

Los Angeles, Cal., Sept. 13. — Jesse D. 
Hampton, of the Jesse D. Hampton Pro- 
ductions, Inc., has let contracts for the 
construction of a $250,000 studio at Santa 
Monica Boulevard and LaBrea, which will 
contain the largest inclosed stage in South- 
ern California. Hampton also has leased 
100 acres back of the Beverly Hills Hotel 
which will be used for an open air stage. 



SKINNER WILL MAKE FILM 

Otis Skinner has at last consented to 
make a motion picture, and will make 
his debut on the silver sheet in "Kismet," 
as Haji, the beggar, in which he has made 
his greatest success on the legitimate 
stage. The production is to be produced 
by the Waldorf Company, and will be 
directed by David G. Fisher. 

MARY PICKFORD BUYS HOME 

Los Angeles, Cal., Sept. 14. — Mary 
Pickford has purchased a piece of ground, 
comprising three lots ana covering two 
acres, for which she paid $45,000. She 
will build a home on the site, which is to 
be modeled after the old English style, and 
is intended to be a show place. 



CAPITOL SIGNS PRYOR'S BAND 

One of the features of the New Capitol 
Theatre's shows will be the music of 
Arthur Pryor's famous band, which has 
just been, engaged, and will be known as 
Pryor's Capitol Band. Pryor will be 
musical director of the theatre, as well. 



SID CHAPLIN PREFERS U. S. 

- Sidney Chaplin has decided that Ameri- 
can atmosphere is best, after all, for the 
making of films,. and he has left Europe 
to return to the United States, declaring 
that film producing here is more feasible. 



SEEK REPEAL OF 

ADMISSION TAX 

LAWS 



CONGRESS REPORTED FAVORABLE 



FILM FLASHES 



Washington, D. C, Sept 15.— Coun- 
trywide organization of motion picture 
theatre owners and patrons has, through 
its representatives, succeeded in placing 
before Congress a petition and request for 
the repeal of the tax on admissions to 
motion picture theatres. The organiza- 
tion numbers about 1,000,000, although it 
is only a tentative association banded to- 
gether for the time being in seeking to do 
something that will be for the general good 
and welfare of the country at large. 

The petition is the result of a campaign 
waged by -the Committee of Legislation and 
Taxation of the Motion Picture Exhibitors 
of America, under the leadership of Louis 
A. Blumenthal, who has organized an ex- 
tensive system of state secretaries, who 
have been lining up public sentiment back 
of the movement. The result of bis work 
is that many members of both branches 
of the national legislature are in favor of 
the repeal of the tax on admissions. 

Exhibitors to-day have to pay a double 
taxation, aside from the one they must 
pay the Federal Government, as part of 
the war taxation measure. They have to 
pay film rentals and deposits for the safe 
return of films, a state license tax, seat: 
taxes, and in many states, several minor 
taxations are made by local statutes. The 
recent organization and unionization of all 
motion picture theatre employees has re- 
sulted in increased expenditures for main- 
tenance, and as a natural result, the price 
of admission has been forced up gradually. 
At the same time, the war taxation has 
been increased, with the result that patron- 
age has suffered. The appeal for the re- 
peal of the law followed. 

It is unknown what action Congress will 
take in the matter, but the petitioners are 
hopeful that the measure will meet, with 
universal approval. At present it has met 
with the approval of a large number in 
each house. The repeal law is being spon- 
sored by Congressman Rodenberg, of Il- 
linois. 

Not only are exhibitors and the public 
back of the movement, but producers, own- 
ers, and exchange men all over the coun- 
try are also supporting the efforts of the 
organization to effect the repeal of the 
law. 



MOVIE CLUB TO RAISE FUNDS 

With the purpose of raising funds for 
the erection of a clnb house in the central 
section of Brooklyn, the Movie Social 
Clnb, Inc., of Kings County, will hold a 
ball at the Brownsville Labor Lyceum, 
Brooklyn, on Sunday evening, November 
2. The members of this club are, for the 
most part, connected with theatrical en- 
terprises in some capacity. Those on the 
ball committee are J. S. Winick, 3. 
Kaplan, M. Warshawer, M. Heller, M. 
Silverman, L. Taffelstein and M. Landy. 
The grand march will be led by Rose 
Tapley, recently with Vitagraph. 

GRIFFITH f .PASES SITE' • 
D. W. Griffith has leased for a number 
of years the estate" of the late Henry M. 
Flagler and will turn it into a motion pic- 
ture studio, with executive offices on the 
property. The estate, twenty-eight acres 
in extent, is situated in the Oreinta Point 
section of .Mamaroneck, and is now the 
property of Elmer E. Smathers, from 
whom Griffith leased j it. Alterations 
amounting to about $1,000,000 .will be i 
made before it is ready' for occupancy as 
a picture studio. 



Owen Moore's first Selinlck will be "Plca- 
dllly Jim." 

"Arliona Cat Claw" will soon be released. 
by World. 

Gertrude Clair, has been encaged tor "The 
Life Test." 



Jay Merely will support Antonla Moreno 
la his serial. 



Frank Keenan has started work on "The 
Life Test- 



Alice Joyce has completed "The Winches- 
ter Woman." 



Wesley Haggles has completed his three 
weeks' vacation. 



Alice Joyce has started work on her next 
Vitagraph feature. 

Norma Talmadge's next Select will be "By 
Right of Conquest" 

Chester Bennett has been appointed a di- 
rector lor Universal. 



Mona Darkfeather la coming back to aims 
to make one-reelers. 



"Ix»t" has been completed as a six-reel 
feature by Universal. 

"The Westerners" la featured at the Brook- 
lyn Strand this week. 

Mary MaeLaren has started work on "No 
Experience Required." 

May Murrlllo has been added to the Norma 
Talmadge scenario staff. 

Edwin I* Hollywood has been added tq 
Universale staff directors. 

Corrlne Griffiths and her company are 
working on "The Climbers." 

Maurice Tournenr wilt screen "Treasure 
Island" for Paramount-Arteraft 



Frank Keenan's "The False Code" will be 
released by Fathe on 8ept. 21. 

Montgomery and Rock have gone to Bal- 
boa Beach to make a new comedy. 

Constance Talmadge is completing her sec- 
ond First National, "The Bachelor." 



Antonio Moreno returned this week to the 
West Coast after a visit to New York. 

Alan Crossland has been signed on a long 
term contract for Selznick Pictures. 



_ Wallace McDonald has been engaged for 
the Juvenile role in "The Life Test" 

The third of the Judge Brown series for 
World pictures, la "Gum Drops and Overalls." 

Chester Bennett has b*en appointed a di- 
rector at the Vitagraph West Coast studios. 

Elsie Jsnts' production. "Everybody's 
Sweetheart," has been re-titled. "A Regular 



Emily Stevens Is working on "The Sacred 
Flame" for the new Schomer-Rosa Produc- 
ing Company. 

William Parke Is now directing for Gold- 
wyn, working on a picture with Pauline 
Fredericks. 



Walter McGrali has been engaged to tup- 
port Elaine Hammerstcin In "The Country 
Cousin." 

Pauline Curley will be seen In a dual role 
In supporting Antonio Moreno In his Uni- 
versal serial. 



"Broken Blossoms," the D. W. Griffith's 
feature, will be released through the United 
Artists Corporation. 

Myron Selznick has purchased the motion 
picture rights to "The Girl From Oat Yon- 
der" to be used for Olive Thomas. 

fttw saw 

IThu it not • Fact Pewdtr] 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



ADAM AND EVA" 
BEST COMEDY SHOW 
OPENED THIS YEAR 



"ADAM AND EVA"— A comedy Of 
American home life. In three seta, by 
Bay Halloa and George Mlddleton. 
Presented by .1*. Bar Comatock and 
Morria , Qest at the Longacra Theatre, 
' Saturday nignt, September 13th, 1»1». 



Churchm 

Corinthis ...Hie*- Jcu Shelby 

CUntOO DeWltt ..BtfllMU Mason 

Julie DeWltt Uias BobarU Arnold 

Era King Mlaa Both ghapUy 

Aunt Abby Becker lliaa Adelaide Prince 

Dr. Jack Delimiter Richard Btarllng 

Code Horace Pllj-rim. Ferdinand Oottarbalk 

Adam Smith Otto Kroger 

Lord Andrew Gordon Coortnjgr root* 



When most of the ploys of the present 
season have come and gone and late 
Spring tells the story of what ones have 
succeeded by a glance at the names of 
those that still remain, "Adam and Era" 
will most likely still be twinkling in elec- 
tric lights over -the entrance of the Long- 
acre Theatre and the press, agent will be 
bragging about its two hundred and ump- 
tieth consecutive performance. For Guy 
Bolton and George Middleton have pro- 
Tided a comedy that runs merrily along 
with a freshness and charm that play- 
wrights so often seek bnt so seldom 
achieve. 

The producers, Comstock and Gest, have 
also done their share, for, in the selection 
of a : capable cast they have shown re- 
markable shrewdness. And, in the staging, 
nothing has been left undone. 

A business man who knows how to make 
money bnt who is grossly incompetent 
when it comes to managing his family, 
furnishes the basis for the plot of "Adam 
and Eva." His life seems to be jost one 
mass of bills and expenses. Is fact, the 
byword of the household seems to- be "O. 
O. D.," which, in this case, stands for 
"Call on Dad." Bat all the members of 
the family and the numerous hangers-on 
are forced to seek employment following a 
false report of dad's failure in bnalness. 

The comedy is not a preachment, bnt 
yet it is not without a moral, for it 
demonstrates that idleness will never lead 
toward true happiness, while honest toil, 
Bs well as being a duty, becomes also a 
pleasure. 

The play is not. a "noisy" one. The 
laughs are not forced , from stagey situa- 
tions nor from exaggerated characteriza- 
tions, but come naturally from the well- 
written lines and the characters drawn, 
who . are all real people that you and I 
probably know in everyday life. 

To whom first honors belong is not easy 
to decide. Berton Churchill, as the fa- 
ther, fits the part like a glove, but the 
audience doesn't get enough of him, as he 
does not appear in the second act. Otto 
Kroger, who takes the role of Adam 
Smith, who faked the ruin of dad, was 
brilliant in the part, and Ruth Shepley, as 
Eva, was more than pleasing. Ferdinand 
Gottscbalk' once more gav.e proof of his 
nigh abilities, and, if he were working on 
a 'laugh rate," — that is. one dollar per 
laugh, ho would be receiving the highest 
salary on Broadway. The cast contains 
no such thing as a weak member. 



Clothes do make the man sometime* for 
the woman. This Is the theme of Thomp- 
son Buchanan's latest play, "Civilian 
Clothes." Buchanan, who was a battery com- 
mander in the American Expeditionary Forc- 
es, has woven a three-act comedy about the 
homecoming of a member of that organiza- 
tion, setting for tb some of the pangs of 
demobilization experienced by a khaki clad 
Apollo, who, 'shorn of Ms uniform and decor- 
atlons, loses his romantic glamor and b«- 
comes lust a man; '' : »V- ^;., 

Sam McGlnnls, a civil engineer, son of a 
shoemaker, works hia way to a captaincy in 
the A. E. F. by sheer-'' force of mind and . 
lists. ' Id that rank he Is decorated with 
the r>. S. C. for bravery, and secretly marries 
Florence Lanham, a daughter of a wealthy 
Southern family, who ia doing war work at 
the front and who la .captivated by the 
grandly heroic way he boxes her ears for 
disobeying orders. 

When McGlnnls returns to America, at the 
close of the war, and at the opening of the ' 
play, he finds the girl he married In her home 
surroundings at Louisville ; a snob of the 
deepest dye. She Is ready to throw him 
over because she doesn't like his family and, 
above all, his clothes, especially his army 
boots. 

The ex-captain, however, coolly announces 
that he will win her yet, by learning to be 
one of her class from those social patterns 
of the time, the servants. So, keeping, his 
Identity a secret from the family, he obtains 
the position of butler In . her father's house. 
Here bis chief diversion Is to gain cheap 
revenge against her Southern suitors. 

.Finally, driven to distraction, the snobbiah 
young woman threatens to elope with one of 
the suitors. Promptly the butler makes love 
to another woman. 

Further entanglements ensue before the 
wayward wife finally comes to acknowledge 
her wilfulness In a bedroom In a New Or- 
leans hotel, though In this Instance the bed- 
room scene is eminently proper and merci- 
fully brief. Ultimately, of course, McGlnnls 
makes good as a civil engineer, cures his 
wife's snobbishness and they reunite. 

The acting is attuned to- the character of 
the play. Thurston Hall, as Sam McGlnnls, 
the homespun hero, was particularly success- 
ful. Another performance, almost as effective 
and perhaps shrewder, was that of Marlon 
Valentine as a scheming widow. OUve Tell 
was beautiful to look at and acted, at times, 
well enough- to make the audience forget the- 
fact. Frank Sylvester, William Holden and 
Jack Eutherford were also effective. 

The piece looks like a bit at this time. 

"SCANDAL" SHOULD 
REPEAT CHICAGO 
SUCCESS ON 1VWAY 



"CIVILIAN CLOTHES" 
LOOKS LIKE A HIT 

FOR MOROSCO 



"OTVHJAN CLOTHEB" — A comedy fat 
three acta and foar scene* by Thomp- 
son Buchanan. Produced by OUvar 
Monaco. Friday evenlnc. September 12, 
at the atoroaeo Theatre. 
CAST 
Billy Arkwrlfht Glen Anders 

Kara Unite Butterfleld. 

General Mclneray .Edirard klackay 

Jack Bnthertord Arthur Albertaon 

rtia nhr a aaSaaaUS Olive Tall 

Ura. v^-*""* .....Iambel Irrtajc 

Bnsabetb Gr*c« Kaber 

flam afcGtmns .Tharatoo Hall 

Una. atarsarat Smyth* Marion Vantroe 

Belle Henderson 

Back Bait. ^....-...Wjniam 

Mr. Lanham ......rrank Sylvester 

Meainnia. Sr. -g anea B- Applets* J 

BssU* HOp "»•»•»»'••»•»* wflastWatZQ w0aftCC00aO.j 

Maid st Hotel. ............... Marx Melroaa ■ 



"SCANDAL" — A comedy In three acts 
by Coamo Hamilton. Produced by 
Walter Hast, Friday evening-, Septem- 
ber 12. at the Thirty-ninth Street 
Theatre. 

OAST 

Pelham Franklin Charlea Cherry 

Malcolm Fraaer. William David 

Sutherland York Malcolm g aaaett 

Major Barnet Thatcher. .... -Hobert Ayr tun 

Pewaey Leonard Wood 

Sarah Margaret CoUlnge 

Mrs. Henry Tanderdyke Alice Putnam 

Miss Honoria Yanderdyke.Iaabel O'Madhran 

Mra. Brown Mary Cecil 

Reglna Waterhooae Marjorle Haat 

Helene Boris Duane 

Beatrix Tanderdyke. .. .Frandno T a rrrlmor a 



"Scandal," from the magazine story of Cob- 
mo Hamilton, which, opened Its New York 
engagement at the Thirty-ninth Street Thea- 
tre Friday night, with Frandne Larrimore 
and Charles Cherry In the chief roles, Is pre- 
ceded by successful runs in London and Chi- 
cago. It is a comedy that sometimes has 
the amusement of a farce and sometimes the 
intensity of a drama. It is on the same order 
as, and has precisely the same appeal, as the 
sex fiction which a certain class of m ags lin es 
'have indulged in so heavily for several years 
past. In all, it is a combination of sex 
stuff and the glitter of "high society." 

"Scandal" concerns the episode of a high 
spirited young woman whose whim is to 
trifle with the passions of a young artist, a 
notorious rake. His name is coupled with 
hers in a scurrilous paragraph of a society 
sheet and, to confound the gossips, she visits 
him In his rooms late at night. Here ahe 
Is accidentally met by two men, old friends, 
who urge discretion upon her.. - .-• 

Her tunny them learns of her escapade, and 
when she Is finally hunted down by her furi- 
ous and disapproving parents, she ' extricates 




herself from her predicament by boldly -an-, 
noundng that she is married, .to the young 
artist. After being placed In this compromis- 
ing position, he feels that, as a gentleman, 
he is bound to bow and submit to her lie, 
but, to "punish her, he means to carry ont the 
prerogatives of his situation. 

It finally develops that. In their bedroom 
that night, he forces her, against her sneers, 
rsge and threats, to submit in complete humil- 
ity, to his wilL . Whereupon he leaves the 
room, with the observation that nothing In 
the world can persuade ' him . to come near 
her again. At, last, as the comedy draws to 
.a close; the two characters are finally recon- 
' died, and, with a deferred marriage In sight, 
'*Sc*#dal M er(us. . "■':• 

The play has been cast with a shrewd eye 
for its values. The man and the woman are 
played by Charles Cherry and Frandne Larrl 
more, the former masterfully masculine, the. 
latter petulantly feminine. The remainder of 
the cast Is thorough and very capable. 

GRACE GEORGE SCORES 

IN NEW PLAY— LITTLE 
TO IT OTHERWISE 



"SHE WOULD AND SHE DID"— A 
three-act comedy of smalt town life by 
Mark Seed. Produced by William A. 
Brady, Thursday evening, September 
11, at the VanderMlt Theatre. 
CAST. 

Frances Neamlth .Grace George 

Mra. Neamlth Isabel West 

Pearl Esther Howard 

Elsie Goward .Cora Withanpoon 

Frank Goward John Cromwell 

Charlie Vincent Edward Arnold 

Beas Trull May Collins 

Wallie Byrnes John Adair, Jr. 

Dr. Coburn ..Fletcher Harvey 

Fisher Brig-ham George MacQuarrler 

Wortheo Bennett John Stokes 

Barley Hunt Lemist Baler 

Major Wilson Ned Burton 

Herbert Arthur Keith 



After a year's absence from the stage, 
Grace George has. made her reappearance in 
a new light comedy, the first produced play 
of a new playwright. "She Would and She 
Did" Is the initial work of Mark Seed, one 
of the Harvard school. It is what might be 
called a very small town comedy, filled with 
very small time people, with nothing more 
to think of than the Injury to their beloved 
golf links. 

The play is an about a tremendous fuss 
over the. suspension of Miss Francis Neamlth 
(Miss George) from a golf club, because she 
hacked three divots out of one of the greens 
with her mashie, Just after Dr. Coburn 
(Fletcher Harvey), as chairman of the greens 
committee, had everything In readiness for 
the Labor Day tournament. 

Whereupon, Miss Nesmith turns the town 
upside down -In her campaign for reinstate- 
ment. She invades the church, agitates the 
bar, meases up politics and unleashes scandal. 
She flirts, cajoles, threatens and plots. She 
woos one man with glances, and another with 
liquor. She begs, bribes and lies. She is 
determined to get back, and she did. 
-^jH* 1 .betrothed (George MacQuarrle), tries 
" to assume an attitude of neutrality and re- 
fused to vote for or against her. He even 
refused to sign the petition for her reinstate- 
ment. But she was still determined to get 
back. So she fought the mere men among 
her enemies with their own weapons, and 
routed them. --t- 

There is such a fuss going on upon the 
stage that it seems almost as if one had 
stumbled upon a little private war in some 
private dub, of great Import to the members, 
but of little Interest to the outside world. 
The author has displayed a certain caustic 
satire, which will, no doubt, delight all mem- 
bers of golf, country or any other dubs to 
which women belong. 

- Throughout the entire play Miss George's 
acting was a praiseworthy characterisation. 
She gave a capital picture of the small town 
vixen with the talent for rubbing people up 
the wrong way, and the gift of setting them 
all agog. None of the other characters seemed 
to be more than theatrical contrivances. 



1 DEATHS \ 

KATE TYDAt-L, who became famous (or 
her impersonation of "Waily" in "Two Lit- 
tle Vagabonds," died last week in London, 
England. She was the widow of Albert 
Gilmer who died about two years ago. 

W. LOUIS BRADFIELD died last Week 
at Brighton, England, aged fifty-three. For 
many years he had been famous' as a light 
and operatic comedian and made his profes- 
tlonal debut thirty-three years - ago in 
Nottingham. His first West End appear- 
ance was as the captain in "In Town." He 
also played the light comedy leadMrr "Flora. 
dors." and many other -such plays. Death 
was sudden and due to heart failure). 

CHARLES R. CURTIS died last Saturday 
at the homo of his sister, Mrs. Leonard 
Sykes. in Dover, Ohio. Curtis, whose 
borne Is In Rochester, was appearing with 
the Bryant Stock Company In West Vir- 
ginia, and was taken suddenly 111. He de- 
cided to go to bis sister's borne and, when 
he arrived, was taken to the Union Hog- 
pltal, where he collapsed. Death was due 
to typhoid fever He was twenty-three 
years of age and well known as a stock 
actor.'. , 

AMY L.YCETT, weU known to the past 
generation as a serio-dancer. died last week 
at "Brlnsworth." the home for actors main- 
tained at Twickenham, England, by the V. 
A. B. F. & L.. at the age of seventy. She 
was. In perfect- health till a few weeks ago 
when she developed- consumption, and died 
before arrangements for her removal to a 
sanltorlum could be completed. She was 
admitted to the institution in 1911. 

M. G. MITCHELL, the playwright, died 
last week In Paris. He had a country home 
in one of the suburbs of that city. 

CHARLES FIGG, character man with the 
"Burlesque Wonder Show," died recently 
in a hospital In Pittsburgh. Death was 
caused by an operation on a carbuncle, 
which had been performed that day. Flgg 
was first taken sick while playing the 
Palace Theatre, Baltimore. He was well 
known in both burlesque and vaudeville. 

JAMES BEVINS died last week at the 
Staten Island Hospital after an illness of 
nearly a year. He was sixty-three years 
old and went Into the Actors' Fund Home 
two years ago, where he was a guest until 
removed to the hospital. 



TO REVIVE G. * S. OPERAS : 

,.. London, Eng., Sept 6 — Rupert Carte has 
fleaded on the date for the opening of his 
season of Gilbert and Sullivan operas as 
September 29, at the Princess Theatre, by 
arrangement with Gilbert Miller. 



IN MEMORY 

of my Beloved Husband and Pa] 

RICHARD E. PAHON 

Passed Away SepL 9, 1919 

HOPER.PATTON 



MADRID STAGE FOLK FORM UNION 

Havana, Cuba, Sept. 5. — Theatrical 
'circles here received word tonight from 
Madrid, that, following the example set 
by actors and actresses is New York, 
chorus girls and boys and musicians of 
the Spanish capital have organised a labor 
union. It is expected they win soon present 
demands for more favorable contracts. 



PROF. FRED MACART, noted animal 
trainer, circus performer, and vaudeville 
artlBt, after a lingering illness of about two 
years, died at his home, 6532 Santa, Monica 
Boulevard, (Hollywood), Los Angeles, last 
week, at sixty-nine years of age. He leaves 
a widow, M»«for" Josephine Macart. to 
whom he had been married more than forty 
years. Prof. Macart was a descendant of 
one of the oldest families in the show busi- 
ness, his mother. Madam Marie Macart, 
being a Glnnett, of the famous Glnnett 
Family; and, at the time of his birth, they 
owned the largest circus In England. Be 
was born In Yarmouth, Kngiand. and en- 
tered the show business at the age of four 
years, appearing in the Cinderella Panto, 
at Astley's Circus, London. From his four 
year old start, he became a well known 
circus performer, travelling. In 1870, with 
the Old Dan Rice show from 1876 to 1878, 
and later with the original Howe's London 
Circus, at that time being known as one 
of the Three Livingston Bros. He played 
three seasons respectively with the Orrln 
Brothers in Cuba, John B. Doris, w. w. 
Cole, Sells Brothers and many others. Bis 
last season under the white tops was with 
Barnum & Bailey in 1S87 and 1888 In Ens- 
land. Finding circus life a bit too strenuous 
he later followed the vaudeville business 
until he sold his animals in Germany and 
returned to Chicago where he remained un- 
til poor health forced him to the Coast. In 
Los Angeles, where he played a few desul- 
tory engagements, his last being at Mo- 
rosco's, where he presented his dog 
"Brownie" in the play, "Young America,' 
week of June 30th, 1918. 



BURLESQUE "CHU CHIN CHOW" 

London, Eng., Sept 14.— The London 
"Follies" were revived last week by 
Ernest C. Roll is, when he presented » 
series of travesty sketches, including > 
burlesque on "Ghn Chin Chow," showing 
the millionth performance of ' the play, 
with all the parties to its production and 
presentation old and decrepit. 



CANADIAN GOVT USING FILMS 
.Toronto, Can, Sept- 12.— The Ontario 



^Provincial Government 
-jji so .of .-films in 'ipof - ' 
las a buaineaB and 



resorted to the 
--""the/ province 
at center. 



sgs, 



. • 



'■■ • . 



,.-, 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



E.F. ALBEE 



F. F. PROCTOR 



B. F. Keith 
Vaudeville Exchange 



(Amy) 



'» N*w TQtk) 



(Piltu 

B. F. KEITH EDWARD F. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

F. F. PROCTOR— FOUNDERS 



Artists Can 



Direct by 



3* K-. Hogjtuom 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Executive Office*, 13t West 4Sth St, New York 
JACK W. LOEB 



EDGAR ALLEN 

11 ta I, or br 



Attention Vaude ville Acts 

John Quigley Theatrical Agency, Inc. 



England's loorlinsr 

for Sanawr. Short 



Agmvcy . VanilawilU i 
184 Boston St, 



UCftCuOBS 



INSURE YOUR M ATERIAL AGAINST THEFT 

REGIS TER YOU R ACT 

SEND IN YOUR MATERIAL 

THIS COUPON will be numbered and attached and a certificate will be returned to you as 
an acknowledgment, and for future reference. The contribution should be signed plainly by the 
person or firm sending the same, and should be endorsed by the stage manager of the show or 
of the house where the act is being used or other witnesses. Farther acknowledgment will be 
made by the names and numbers being published. 

Address your contributions to 

The Registry Bureau 

NEW YORK CUPPER. MM Broadway. New York 



Date 

NEW YORK CUPPER REGISTRY BUREAU 

Enclosed please find copy of my 

■stilled •• 

lor Registration. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



CERTIFICATES ISSUED 



1347— Salzman & Morris. . . 

1J48— Rosa Forregrosa 

1349— Florence A. Brennan. 
1350— Frank Pepe .......... 

1351— Bernard A. Grossman. 



-Act 

Act 

Songs 

...Song Lyrics 
.Lyrics 



1352-Frederick Wallace Scenario 

1353— Bemhard Lohmuller Novelty 

1354— Lewis & Green Titles 

135S— H. P. Young Title 

US6- W. Earthman FarreM Lyric 

PAPER HATS 



LJS7— A. Enbanks Act 

1358— Sydney B. Chase Drama 

1359— Marie Hart .Act 

136D- Frank Gould Material 

1381— W. 11. Cooke Material 

H£~"5fT' r . 1 i? ,to ? Gag and Act 

HS~5? eh ^*4. HMnlin •***■ 

1364— David Greenberg Ballad 

1365— Lieut. Harry Berry Title 

1366— Walter E. Peter. .'.Songs 

1367-Charles L Mollis Book 



w 



Toupeea Make-Up 

Sand tar Pries List 

,,,, r °- SMNDHELM 
HILE i«tw. sethst. New-Yerk 



IGS 

ORTH 



C L I F» 

BUSINESS 



INDEX 



. Advertisements not rtctrdlog eae Baa in 
length nBI be published, properly clssslaod. in 
this index, at the rate of $10 far one year (S3 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 

LAWYERS. 
A. O'Brien, 1403 Broadway, New York 



Edward Doyle, Attorney, 421 Merchants Bank 

Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 
James S. Kleinmaa, Equitable Bldg., U» 

B'way, New York City. 
F. L. Boyd, 17 No. La Salle St. Chicago. 

MUSICAL BJawR 
A. Brannneiss, 1012 Napier Ave~ Richmond Hill. 
N. Y. 

SCENERY. 

SCBELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

IH-U3-U8 South High St, Till sank sn. O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St, Philadel- 
phia, Pa, 

SONG BOOKS. 
Win. W. Dclaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goss Co., 10 Atwater St., Detroit, Mich. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St, Boa- 
ton, Maaa. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
A. W. Gentner Co, 634 8th Are. (41it St.), 
N. Y. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson, 371 West 150th St., New York 

■-■-. Cfty. • 

VIOLINS AND SUPPLIES. 

August Gemonder A Sons, 141 W. 42nd St., 



TAYLOR TRUNKS 

C. A. Tavlor Trunk Works 



<.: Mil. ."» fciCl 



SCENERY 

Diaanona Dyo. OB er Watar Colors 
SCHELL SCENIC STUDIO. COLUMBUS. O 



Wardrobe Prop Trunks, *5.°° 

Big Bargain. Have been need. Also a tew 
Second Hand Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunks, $10 and 813. A tew extra larav 
Wanes t» Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks 
and Bal Trunks. _ 

Parlor Floor, 88 W. list St, New York City 



HERALDS 

5.000 »il2 Herel*. 4 pp., seek pass 8x» 812.63 

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34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 17, 1919 



"ADAM AND EVA" 
BEST COMEDY SHOW 
OPENED THIS YEAR 



•ADAM AND EVA"— A Comedy of 
Anericia borne life. In three acta, by 
Gox HoltoB and Ow e s s kflddleton. 
_ Presented by F. Bar Camatoek and 
I Morris Gest at tie Loagacre Tbeatn, 
' 8etnnbxj nl*bt, Beptemoer lata, 1*19. 
PSfc - *- CAST . '- 

James Kkaf Barton Chnrchni 

CortDtB!a JOm Jean Shelby 

CUntoo DeWltt —■MM Mason 

Julie DeWttt Ulsa Bot irta Araold 

awa Klac Was Both BoSOaty 

Anat Abby Backer ktlaa Adelaide Prince 

Dr. Jack Delamattr Richard Sterling; 

Uncle Horace nifTlm. Ferdinand Gottsraslk 
Adam Smith. ...... ...........Otto Kraser 

Lard Andrew Gordon Courtnay Foot* 



When most of the plays of the present 
season hare come and gone and late 
Spring tells the story of what ones hare 
succeeded by a glance at the names of 
those that still remain, "Adam and Era'' 
win most likely still be twinkling in elec- 
tric lights over the entrance of the Long- 
acre Theatre and the press agent will be 
bragging abont its two hundred and nmp- 
tietii consecutive performance. For Guy 
Bolton and George Middleton hare pro- 
vided a comedy that runs merrily along 
with a freshness and charm that play- 
wrights so often seek but so seldom 
achieve. 

The producers, Comstock and Gest, hare 
also done their share, for, in the selection 
of a capable cast they hare shown re- 
markable shrewdness. And, in the staging, 
nothing has been left undone. 

A business man who knows how to make 
money bat who is grossly incompetent 
when it comes to managing his family, 
furnishes the basis for the plot of "Adam 
and Eva." His life seems to be just one 
mass of bills and expenses. In fact, the 
byword of the household seems to be "C. 
O. D.," which, in this case, stands for 
"Call on Dad." But all the members of 
the family and the numerous hangers-on 
are forced to seek employment following a 
false . report of dad's failure in business. 

The comedy is not a preachment, but 
yet it is. not .without a moral, for it 
demonstrates that idleness will never lead 
toward true happiness, while honest toil, 
«s well as being a duty, becomes also a 
pleasure. 

The play is not .a "noisy" one. The 
laughs are not forced . from stagey situa- 
tions nor from exaggerated characteriza- 
tions, but come naturally from the well- 
written' lines and the characters drawn, 
who .are all real people that you and I 
probably know in everyday life. 

To whom first honors belong is not easy 
to decide. Berton Churchill, as the fa- 
ther, fits the part like a glove, but the 
audience doesn't get enough of him, as he 
' does not appear in the second act. Otto 
Kroger,' who takes the role of Adam 
Smith, who faked the ruin of dad, was 
brilliant in the part, and Ruth Shepley, as 
Era, was more than pleasing. Ferdinand 
Gottschalk once more gave proof of his 
high abilities, and, If he were working on 
a "laugh rate," — that is, one dollar per 
laugh, he would be receiving the highest 
salary on Broadway. The cast contains 
no such thing as a weak member. 



'^CIVILIAN CLOTHES'* 
LOOKS LIKE A HIT 

FOR MOROSCO 



v 



"CIVILIAN CLOTHBB"— A comedy to. 
three acta aad foar acenea by Tbomp- 
aoa Bscbaaan. Produced by Oliver 
Morocco. Friday erenlnx. September IS, 
at the Marasco Theatre. 
OUT 

HUj Ariwrlxht -Glen Anders 

Nan rr.T MUUe Batterfleld 

General atelnemy .Edward atackay 

Jack Rutherford Arthur Albertaon 

, OUra Tea 

Iaabel lrrlnc 

.„. ......Grace. Kabec 

......... -Thanton Hall 

acre. Marraret Smyth* Marian Vanttne 

Bala> Henderson Bessie Kytoa 

lack Hart 1 „.,..wiiim nouwi 



at eSlnnla, Br. 



Mild at Hotel. . 



zL AppMeafJ 

OlSaiiliaLiI 
....... Marl laeiroaa - 



Clothes do make the man sometimes for 
the woman. This is the theme of Thomp- 
son Buchanan's latest play, "Civilian 
ClotheiL" Buchanan, who was a battery com- 
mander in the American Expeditionary Forc- 
es, has woven a three-act comedy abont the 
homecoming of a member of that organiza- 
tion, setting for th some of the pangs of 
demobilization experienced by a *•*»■** clad 
Apollo, who, shorn of his uniform and decor- 
ations, .loses, his romantic glamor and be- 
comes Just a man; ■ ? ... 

8am McGlnnls, a ciril engineer, son of a 
shoemaker, works his way - to a captaincy In 
the A. E. F. by sheer- force of' mind and 
fists. In that rank he is decorated with 
the D. S. C for bravery, and secretly marries 
Florence Lanhstn, a daughter of a Wealthy 
Southern family, who is doing war work at 
the front and who is captivated by the 
grandly heroic way he boxes her ears for 
disobeying orders. 

When McGlnnls returns to America, at the 
close of the war, and at the opening of the - 
play, he finds the girl he married in her home 
surroundings at Louisville; a snob of the 
deepest ('re. She Is ready to throw him 
over because she doe*n*t like his family and. 
above all, bis clothes, especially his army 
boots. 

The ex-captain, however, coolly announces 
that he will win her yet, by learning to be 
one of" her class from those social patterns 
of the time, the servants. So, keeping his 
Identity a secret from the family, he obtains 
the position of butler In her father's house. 
Here his chief diversion is to gain cheap 
revenge against her Southern suitors. 

Finally, driven to distraction, the snobbish 
young woman threatens to elope with one of 
the suitors. Promptly the butler makes love 
to another woman. 

Further entanglements ensue before the 
wayward wife finally comes to acknowledge 
hex wilfulness In a bedroom in a New Or- 
leans hotel, though in this instance the bed- 
room scene is eminently proper and merci- 
fully brief. Ultimately, of course, McGlnnls 
makes good aa a civil engineer, cures his 
wife's snobbishness and they reunite. 

The acting la attuned to the character of 
the play. Thurston "all as Sam McGlnnls, 
the homespun hero, was particularly success- 
ful. Another performance, almost aa effective 
and perhaps shrewder, was that of Marlon 
Valentine as a scheming widow. Olive Tell 
was beautiful to look at and acted, at times, 
well enoagh- to make the audience forget the' 
fact Frank Sylvester, William Holden and 
jack Kutherford were also effective- 

The piece looks like a hit at this time. 

"SCANDAL" SHOULD 
REPEAT CHICAGO 
SUCCESS ON 1VWAY 



'■SCANDAL" — A comedy In three acts 
by Cosmo Hamilton. P iodocad by 
Walter Seat, Friday erealas. Septem- 
ber 12. at the Thirty-ninth Street 
Theatre. 

CAST 

Pelham Franklin ....Charles Cherry 

Malcolm Fraaer William David 

Sutherland York Malcolm Fa aaett 

Major Baraet Thatcher. . ... .Robert Ayrton 

Fewsey Leonard Wood 

Sarah Margaret Collinge 

Mrs. Henry Vanderdyke Alice Putnam 

Mlaa Honorla Vanderdyke. Iaabel O'Hadlgan 

Mrs. Brown Mary Cecil 

Beglna Waterhooae -Marjorte Hast 

Helena Doris Dnaa* 

Beatrix Vanderdyke Frandne Larrimora 



"Scandal," from the magazine story of Cos- 
mo Hamilton, which opened its New York 
engagement at the Thirty-ninth Street Thea- 
tre Friday night, with Frandne Larrlmore 
and Charles Cherry In the chief roles, Is pre- 
ceded by successful runs in London and Chi- 
cago. It is a comedy that sometimes has 
the amusement of a farce and sometimes the 
intensity of a drama. It la on the same order 
as, and has precisely the same appeal, as the 
sex fiction which a certain class of magazines 
'have Indulged In so heavily for several years 
past. In all. it is a combination of sex 
stuff and the glitter of "high society." 

••Scandal" concerns the episode of' a high 
spirited young woman whose whim- la to 
trifle with the passions of a young artist, a 
notorious rake. His name Is coupled with 
hers in a scurrilous paragraph of a society 
sheet and, to confound the gossips, she visits 
him In his rooms late at night. Here she 
la accidents illy met by two men, old friends, 
who urge discretion upon hex.. - :'■ 

Her family then learns of her escapade, and 
when she Is finally hunted down by her furi- 
ous and disapproving parents, she extricates 




herself from her predicament by boldly -an-. 
noundng that she Is married .to the young 
artist. After being placed In this compromis- 
ing position, he feels' that, ms a gentleman, 
he la bound to bow and submit to her lie, 
but, to punish her, he means to -carry out the 
prerogatives of his situation. 

It finally develops that, in their bedroom 
that night, he forces her. against her sneers, 
rage and threats, to submit In complete humil- 
ity, to his will. Whereupon, be leaves the 
room, with the observation that nothing/' in 
the world can persuade him to come near 
her again. At. last, aa the comedy draws to 
.a dose, the. two characters are finally recon- 
ciled and, with a deferred marriage' In sight, 
"Scandal" enSls. . '." ~ 

The play has been cast with a shrewd eye 
for Its values. The man and the woman are 
played by Charles Cherry and Frandne Larrl- 
more, the former masterfully masculine, the. 
latter petulantly feminine. The remainder of 
the cast Is thorough and very capable. 



GRACE GEORGE SCORES 
IN NEW PIJ^Y-UTTLE 
TO IT OTHERWISE 



"SHE WOtFIaD 

tHree-aet corned, 
Mark Reed. Pi 
Bradj, Th uracil 
11, at the Van 

Frances NeamiUi 


&SD SHE DID"— A 
r of small town. life by 
■odnced by William A. 
X CTenl&f, September 
lerbllt Theatre. 
CAST. 
















Charlie Vincent . . 










FIsber BrLgham . 
Worth en Bennett 














Arthrn* TTMth 





After a year's absence from the stage, 
Grace George has made her reappearance In 
a new light comedy, the first produced play 
of a new playwright. "She Would and She 
Did" la the Initial work of Mark Reed, one 
of the Harvard school. It Is what might be 
called a very small town comedy, filled with 
very small time people, with nothing more 
to think of than the Injury to their beloved 
golf links. 

The play Is all about a tremendous fuss 
over the suspension of Bliss Francis Nesmlth 
(Miss George) from a golf dub, because she 
hacked three divots out of one of the greens 
with her maahle, Just after Dr. Coburn 
(Fletcher Harvey), aa chairman of the greens 
committee, had everything In readiness for 
the Labor Day tournament. 

Whereupon, Miss Nesmlth turns the town 
upside down in her campaign for reinstate- 
ment She Invades the church, agitates the 
bar, messes up politics and unleashes scandal. 
She flirts, cajoles, threatens and plots. She 
woos one man with glances, and another with 
liquor. She begs, bribes and lies. She la 
determined to get back, and she did. 
TiHar Aetrothed (George MacQuarrle), tries 
tor assume an attitude of neutrality and re- 
fused to vote for or against her. He even 
refused to sign the petition for her reinstate- 
ment. But she was still determined to get 
back. So she fought the mere men among 
her enemies with their own weapons, and 
routed them. ., 

There Is such a fuss going on upon the 
stage that it seems almost as if one had 
stumbled upon a little private war in some 
private dub, of great Import to the members, 
but of little interest to the outside world. 
The author has displayed a certain caustic 
satire, which win, no doubt, delight all mem- 
bers of golf, country or any other dubs to 
which women belong. 

Throughout the entire play Miss George's 
acting was a praiseworthy characterization. 
She gave a capital picture of the small town 
vixen with the talent for rubbing people up 
the wrong way, and the gift of setting them 
all agog. None of the other characters seemed 
to be more than theatrical contrivances. 



(Tku U net a Face Ppmttr) 



TO REVIVE G. * S. OPERAS 

... London, Eng., Sept. 6. — Rupert Carte has 
decided on the date for th* opening of Us 
season ; of Gilbert and SulBvan operas aa 
September 29, at the Princess Theatre, by 
"arrangement with Gilbert Idler. 



| DEATHS | 

KATE TYOALL, who became famous for 
her Impersonation of "Wally" in "Two Lit- 
tle Vagabonds," died last week In London, 
England. She was the widow of Albert 
Gilmer who died about two years ago. 

W. LOUIS BRADFIELD died last week 
at Brighton, England, aged fifty-three. For 
many years he bad been famous as a light 
and operatic comedian and made his profes- 
tional debut thirty-three years - ago in 
Nottingham. His first West End appear- 
ance was as the captain in "In Town." He 
also played the light comedy leadMir "Flora - 
dora" and many other uuch plays. Death 
was sudden and duo to heart failure. 

CHARLES R. CURTIS died last Saturday 
at the home of his sister, Mrs. Leonard 
Sykea, In Dover, Ohio. Curtis, whose 
home is in Rochester, was appearing with 
the Bryant Stock Company in 'West Vir- 
ginia, and was taken suddenly ill. He de- 
cided to go to his sister's home and, when 
he arrived, was taken to the Union Hos- 
pital, where he collapsed. Death was due 
to typhoid fever He was twenty-three 
years of age and well known aa a stock 
actor. . .-■;..'-. . r 

AMY LYCETT, wen known to the past 
generation as a serio-dancer, died last week 
at "Brinsworth," the home for actors main- 
tained at Twickenham, England, by the V. 
A. B. P. & L., at the age of seventy. She 
was in perfect health till a few weeks ago 
when she developed consumption, and died 
before arrangements for her removal to a 
sanltorium could be completed. She was 
admitted to the institution In 1911. 

M. Q. MITCHELL, the playwright, died 
last week In Paris. He had a country home 
in one of the suburbs of that city. 

CHARLES FIGG, character man with the 
"Burlesque Wonder Show," died recently 
In a hospital in Pittsburgh. Death was 
caused by an operation on a carbuncle, 
which had been performed that day. Figg 
was first taken sick while playing the 
Palace Theatre. Baltimore. He was well 
known in both burlesque and vaudeville. 

JAMES BEVINS died last week at the 
Staten Island Hospital after an illness of 
nearly a year. He was sixty-three years 
old and went into the Actors' Fund Home 
two years ago, where he was a guest until 
removed to the hospital. 



MADRID STAGE FOLK FORM UNION 
.Havana, Cuba, Sept. 5. — Theatrical 
circles here received word tonight from 
Madrid, that, following the example set 
by actors and actresses in New York, 
chorus girls and boys and musicians of 
the Spanish capital have organised a labor 
onion. It is expected they wQl soon present 
demands for more favorable contracts. 



IN MEMORY 

of my Beloved Husband and Pal 

RICHARD E. PAHON 

Passed" Away Sept. 9, 1919 

HOPE R. PATTON 



PROF. FRED MACART, noted animal 
trainer, circus performer, and vaudeville 
artist, after a lingering Illness of about two 
years, died at his home, 5532 Santa Monica 
Boulevard. (Hollywood), Log Angeles, last 
week, at sixty-nine years of age. He leaves 
a widow. Madam Josephine Macart. to 
whom he had been married more than forty 
years. Prof. Macart was a descendant of 
one of the oldest families In the show busi- 
ness, his mother. Madam Marie Macart. 
being a Ginnett, of the famous Ginnett 
Family; and, at the time of his birth, they 
owned the largest circus in England. He 
was bora In Yarmouth, England, and en- 
tered the show business at the age of four 
years, appearing in the Cinderella Panto, 
at Astley's Circus, London- From his four 
year old start, he became a well known 
circus performer, travelling. In 1870, with 
the Old Dan Rice show from 1876 to 1878, 
and later with the original Howe's London 
Circus, at that time being known as one 
of the Three Livingston Bros. He played 
three seasons respectively with the Orrln 
Brothers in Cuba, John B. Doris. W. W. 
Cole, Sells Brothers and many others. His 
last season under the white tops was with 
Barnum & Bailey in 1887 and 1888 In Eng- 
land. Finding circus life a bit too strenuous 
he later followed the vaudeville business 
unto he sold his animals In Germany and 
returned to Chicago where he remained un- 
til poor health forced him to the Coast hi 
Los Angeles, where he played a few desul- 
tory engagements, bis last being at Mo- 
roBco's. where he presented bis dog 
"Brownie" In the play. "Young America," 
week of June 30th. 1918. 



BURLESQUE "CHU CHIN CHOW" 
LorTDOH, Eng., Sept. 14. — The Londoa 
"Follies" were revived last week by 
Ernest O. RoHis, when he presented * 
series of travesty sketches, including > 
burlesque on "Chu Chin Chow," showing 
the millionth performance of the play, 
with all the parties to its production ana 
presentation old and decrepit. 



CANADIAN GOVT USING FILMS 
Toaosro, Catu Sept B.— Tne Ontario 
■Provincial Government Xgs resorted to the 



fasa of ■ films in popnlsoSfiig the? province 
imuS